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Alright, so I am trying to make an iso image of a playstation disc, so I can use it more effectively on my emulator, but everything I try, whether it be cat /dev/cdrom < /home/firesburnsmup/PSX/disc1.iso or dd if=/dev/cdrom of=$HOME/PSX/disc1.iso whatever I do, it will tell me that /dev/cdrom: Input/Output error For the record, I am NOT PIRATING! I own this game and want a copy on my hdd. If there's some wierd way to get around copy protection (if that's the problem) I would like to know. I always make copies of my games so I can bring them to school without bringing my systems.
(I felt like I didn't want to get yelled at for piracy on a site I really like ^_^U, sorry about the rant)

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Last Post by John A
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For one thing, you aren't doing this command right:

cat /dev/cdrom < /home/firesburnsmup/PSX/disc1.iso

It should be '>', not '<'. I haven't actually tried this, but I don't think it will work even with the correct redirection operator.

This should work better:

  1. Get information about the CD first using isoinfo like this:
    # isoinfo -d -i /dev/cdrom

    You should get a response like this:

    CD-ROM is in ISO 9660 format
    System id: LINUX
    Volume id: Red Hat Linux/Intel 5.1.5
    Volume set id: 
    Publisher id: Red Hat Software, (888) RED-HAT1
    Data preparer id: Red Hat Software, (888) RED-HAT1
    Application id: Red Hat Linux/Intel 5.1.5
    Copyright File id: 
    Abstract File id: 
    Bibliographic File id: 
    Volume set size is: 1
    Volume set seqence number is: 1
     Logical block size is: [B]2048[/B]
     Volume size is: [B]329989[/B]
    NO Joliet present
    Rock Ridge signatures version 1 found
  2. Record the values of "Logical block size" and "Volume size".
  3. Using the values obtained from the previous step, enter this command:
    dd if=/dev/cdrom bs= (Logical block size) count=  (Volume size) > ~/PSX/disc.iso
  4. If everything went correctly, you should have the iso file in your folder.

Hope this helps

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well, It got a little bit of data when I do it that way, but still gave the same output after a few thousand bytes. I think it's a copy-protection thing. I don't know how to get around that though.

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well, It got a little bit of data when I do it that way, but still gave the same output after a few thousand bytes. I think it's a copy-protection thing. I don't know how to get around that though.

Are you sure that the disc is clean? Often scratches and rivets will prevent the operating system from reading data properly from the CD drive device.

And yes it is quite possible that this could be due to copy-protection. However, I think that circumventing this type of protection could be breaking the law, even if your intentions are only to backup games you own.

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Hello there.

well, It got a little bit of data when I do it that way, but still gave the same output after a few thousand bytes. I think it's a copy-protection thing. I don't know how to get around that though.

I hope you realize that getting around the copy-protection thing constitutes a form of piracy even if you own the game. Getting around this protection is what exactly the pirates do before making copies of the game and selling them illegally. Searching google for "getting around copy protection" will make you realize in which direction you are heading.

It would be really a good thing if you stopped this discussion right there before some other *strict* mod comes around and drops you an infraction.

Thank you.

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*sigh* alright. I give up. I'll try to do things my way. Thanks anyway, guys. (and sos, for not getting too mad at me ^_^U)

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I hope you realize that getting around the copy-protection thing constitutes a form of piracy even if you own the game. Getting around this protection is what exactly the pirates do before making copies of the game and selling them illegally. Searching google for "getting around copy protection" will make you realize in which direction you are heading.

Which is sort of what I was trying to say here:

However, I think that circumventing this type of protection could be breaking the law, even if your intentions are only to backup games you own.

But here's a gray area of the law: it's illegal to actually try to understand and break the copy-protection system of DVD/PS2 CDs/etc, however it's not entirely illegal to actually use such software, as you haven't actually cracked the copy protection; the developers have.

A perfect example of this is using a DVD ripper - it wouldn't work if it didn't get around the copy-protection. By using such software you are safe, but the developers who wrote the software certainly aren't. ;)

It would be really a good thing if you stopped this discussion right there before some other *strict* mod comes around and drops you an infraction

Yes, good call.

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