Twitter has been in the headlines again. You can now pay a company to find potential followers, approach them and ask them to follow you and it's apparently a very innovative approach. It must be, that's why the BBC thought it newsworthy.

Actually I'm not so sure. I think I've seen things like this many times before, sometimes respectable and sometimes less so.

Let's consider what this Australian organisation is doing. It's buying or harvesting a list from somewhere, and it's mailing the members of that list. Mercifully it's not selling the list so just anyone can mail them.

Nonetheless, it's sending out unsolicited Tweets. I'm not actually so down on this, myself, it's called marketing and sometimes people do it through email. Or Twitter. I do hope it doesn't grow too much, though; one of the best things about Twitter at the moment is its informal, uncluttered nature - sure, there are a lot of Tweets that are going to be of little interest but the vast majority is well-meant and has a person behind it. It would be a shame to see that go.

That's the beauty about the internet and the ever evolving 'modes of production'. What worked yesterday might be obsolete today, what is unthinkable today might be a million dollar idea tomorrow!

Like other forms of media (eg email) you have basically 1 or 2 opportunities to "spam" your content. Thereafter, your friends and followers start ignoring your input. And if you continue, you could be blacklisted (email), or loose friends and followers in your social networks. Hashtags (eg #moonfruit) seems to have potential in terms of a successful twitter campaign. But, with such a vastly dynamic communication tool I am sure such campaign styles will become boring (even frustrating) to twitter users fairly soon.

Here is the thing. People left Myspace for Facebook, because Myspace had more spam. Then People Left Facebook for Twitter because Facebook has more spam. If Twitter becomes cluttered with Spam, somethign else will replace it.

Dan