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I'm an experienced web developer in the confines of a .net environment. I'll looking to start working on a desktop application, but I'd like to steer away from .net.

The programming language should meet the following criteria:

- High level Object Oriented (higher than C, more like C#)
- Not dependent on external installations (i.e. .net framework, Java Console)
- Has a strong community backing (tutorials, libraries, ect)
- The language is not C++.

So... any and all suggestions are accepted. I'd prefer a variety of languages to pick from, so don't all suggest the same thing. :)

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Last Post by Intrade
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  • The only real language is, BrainF' Read More

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    If you drop Point #2, Python can be your wand. It is a language which will support easy transformation of your ideas to codes. If you drop Point #4, C++ satisfies all the above points. Perl is an interpreted language. I still would go with python since it is really … Read More

  • C++ doesn't have automatic memory management, which is a very big deal. This means it takes a lot of knowledge to use the language efficiently. The language might be tolerable to people who have this knowledge, but not to those who lack it. Read More

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Haskell. It's not object oriented -- it's better than object oriented. I "recommend" this because it's my language of choice, but there's a huge learning curve, so it's not ideal.

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If you drop Point #2, Python can be your wand. It is a language which will support easy transformation of your ideas to codes.
If you drop Point #4, C++ satisfies all the above points.

Perl is an interpreted language.


I still would go with python since it is really easy to learn and follow. It is not as fast as most of the compile time languages(like C,C++) but you won't care about speed for most of the matters.(All I meant to say is that it will compete C|C++ in most cases)
Python though requires python runtime requirement. But it is not a bad thing until you are programming stealth tools like trojan horses or keyloggers.

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Well too bad you seem to have a thing against a Python environment - Py3k is quite handy.
Seems like you'd also be against F# soooooo

1) D [ not C++ / not Java / not C# but ... functionality similar to and surpassing them all]

2) Ada
It is often overlooked but a lot of DoD drones n bots are actually logging 10s of thousands of 'successful' live hours.

3) Haskell
Easy to use but .... not a lot of people know the language though so you're kind of flying solo on most every project

4) Object Pascal
Less proprietary than Delphi.... less fluffy extensions from borland (and now embarcadero)

C++ya,
xkey

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D is too complicated (but cool), Ada is too much crap, Haskell is awesome and has an awesome community except there's a huge learning curve which is awesome and epiphinaical itself, Object Pascal is whatever. F# is... an excellent .NET language. Obviously.

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.Net still works for me! it's got a lot of extras that is easy to use, and if you do get stuck sometimes, you can always "phone a friend".

Delphi has got it's limitations and does not compile in all environments.

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why not c++, it can do (essentially) anything and fulfills all your requirements, except for the self-defeating "the language is not c++" one.

what exactly do you not like about it?

asm is quite useful as long as you are up for a challenge.

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C++ doesn't have automatic memory management, which is a very big deal. This means it takes a lot of knowledge to use the language efficiently. The language might be tolerable to people who have this knowledge, but not to those who lack it.

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C++ doesn't have automatic memory management, which is a very big deal. This means it takes a lot of knowledge to use the language efficiently. The language might be tolerable to people who have this knowledge, but not to those who lack it.

The C++ language by itself doesn't have automatic memory management, but that is why libraries exist to allow programmers to be able to use the language without worrying too much about memory.

Depending on your needs, the STL is more than enough. If the STL is too bulky for the platform you're working on, then you should be smart enough to write Pseudo-code and look at documentation to follow when certain objects/types need to be freed. If the bulkiness isn't the problem and the STL doesn't provide you with enough firepower, there's always Boost and a variety of other libraries.

To the Original Poster: I believe the new C++ should be coming out this year (or already has). You should look into it and see if it will be better?

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