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Hi, I am a almost thirtysomething, going back to school at night while working full time. I decided that it was time to get an education to enable me to break out of the Cable industry and into the programming scene. I am interested in Computer Science and web programming(maybe). So I am asking for some advice from you younsters out there.

This Winter semester I am taking Intro C++ because last semester I took an intro Comp Science course that had some basic programming using C++ in it. I enjoyed the programming aspect of the class very much, which is why I decided to persue programming.

So over the last couple weeks I discovered VB.NET and have been learning it with the assistance of some good books. Now I can see the power in the .NET framework, but I still see C++ and the industry standard I guess. Now as someone learning their first language, what should I focus on: C++ or VB.NET? or both?

I know programming isn't language exclusive, that you start with an algorithm and logic, then port it to a language. What do the Gods of programming sugest? Where is the industry going. Any suggestions are welcome.

Thanks
Josh :?:

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Last Post by ocmseo
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I suggest starting with the happy medium - C#. C# brings most of the VB.NET ease, with Java (Java is based upon C++) and C styling. When applying for a job, a C# programmer is more likely to win a .NET job, and is more likely to get paid higher.

No matter what Microsoft does to the VB language, it will almost be exclusively known as a beginner language. I'm "fluent" in VB.NET, and used to use it as my main programming language. I know those people are wrong - but thats just its reputation.

I've enjoyed C# so much, that I regret having to code in VB.NET for some things. I've even ported most of my VB.NET code to C# (which isn't that hard) - yeah, it doesn't matter that its in VB.NET, but I just love C# so much that I wanted it in my favorite language.

Whatever route you take - stay close to the .NET Framework. The .NET Framework is so powerful, so feature complete, and is always being refined that so many things are going to be using it in the comming years. The next version of Windows, codenamed Longhorn, is being specifically designed with .NET in mind. .NET is going to be everywhere soon enough (even on Linux!).

<semi-advertisement>My CMS system, #Portal, runs on a huge IT News website, Bink.nu. #Portal uses many .NET core technologies, is written in C#. </semi-advertisement>

Feel free to ask any questions ya need ;-)

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You'll have an easy time learning the basics of programming with C++ than any other language I believe. I don't know of at least one good programmer that hasn't had 1+ years of the language. Java is currently more popular than C# but C# is growing. Personally, C# was easy for me, after having nearly six years of C++ and two years of Java, but that's exactly what I'm talking about. If it wasn't for C++, I would've had a harder time learning the language. I don't know how much you know about C++ but if you feel comfortable, then I recommend you go to C#, because I also think it's a kickass language. As a bonus, I also recommend you to learn some XML/XLST, CSS, and XQUERY if you have time.

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I see around me .NET and .NET and .NET, so I think it would be wise to go .NET

Even if you don't like it.

Personally I am hooked on PHP and database backend powered by hardware. But then again, I am just a geek ;)

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I see around me .NET and .NET and .NET, so I think it would be wise to go .NET

Wow. I give you props for saying that, as you are a PHP guy.

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I'm also hooked on PHP. I just wish it was accepted more by enterprises compared to .NET languages.

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i propose that u learn C++ and java at the same time since these 2 languages will not die
anytime soon. try to focus on java if you can since the java online libraries are the best utility that any programmer can have. there is no need to worry about wether u work on
windows , unix , linux, mac os....java will work on any system. plus now java is being taken from server side to security and heavy crptography. as you may realize that i am a major java fan, but i dont roll out that flaws of java which is the runtime speed thats why learn C++ and mainly under the unix/linux systems.

from my experience i feel that once u feel comfortable with java and C++ and interchange them then jump into C# or VB or python, or any scripting language, i assure u that C++ and java is the way to go.

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C# or VB or python, or any scripting language

C# is not a scripting language. It is fully compiled. It works a lot like java, except that it runs much faster, and its easier to work with.

C# is an enterprise language - because it runs on the .NET Framework.

Java and C# are very much alike - but C# has many advantages over Java (with that said, there are a few good parts about Java, but that will go away soon).

C# runs on many platforms - including Linux. The Mono platform has done some great work with C# on Linux.

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It is coming that PHP will be accepted by .NET - or is it already? Anyway, it is making its own stand, and seems to be growing in popularity. In my experience!

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C++ and Perl. Perl can be a really powerful language for networking especially server administration. Although it's mainly used for scripting actual application uses are also possible. My main language is JAVA although I know it's not the best one to know it's what I've done the most work in.

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c++ is a good language to start on. not too hard for beginners...
-h3rtz-

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... logic is almost identical from one language to another... I really think java is a great first language (first language... not only language)... because the compiler errors are just sooooo nice (hey... you... programmer... you're trying to put a floating point number in this here integer slot... line 53... fix it, then I'll think about compiling for you)


I mean... the logic is easy enough to grasp for most... it's the problems that you run into that really cost you time... and if you don't have someone to help you find your errors in C++, it can be a real terror for a beginner

*edit*
this is based on my *very* limited knowledge =)... I'm no guru... yet

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... logic is almost identical from one language to another... I really think java is a great first language (first language... not only language)... because the compiler errors are just sooooo nice (hey... you... programmer... you're trying to put a floating point number in this here integer slot... line 53... fix it, then I'll think about compiling for you)


I mean... the logic is easy enough to grasp for most... it's the problems that you run into that really cost you time... and if you don't have someone to help you find your errors in C++, it can be a real terror for a beginner

*edit*
this is based on my *very* limited knowledge =)... I'm no guru... yet

I agree with you Java is the easiest to learn. Since you are just starting out I would recommend Java since it is so user friendly. Once you are comfortable with the data structures and algorithms used in programming then you can move on to C++, C, C#, what ever language you need to use, because for the most part the constructs are the same in any language just the syntax is different.
I started out with Java, had to program a Neural Network Simulator so I used C++, got a job in a lab where I started out having to build simple content management systems for some departments on campus so I learned PHP in two weeks to do the job. This term I decided to learn Python for an AI assignment (python is very cool I might add) and it was easy. I guess my point is once you learn one language and the fundamentals behind programming learning other languages is alot easier.
Also I think you said you started learning C++ so I would stick with C++. .Net just seems to restrictive as far as giving yourself the best possible options for jobs later. C++, I think, is still more valuable on your resume then .net. With C++ you can, without much effort, program in .Net (C++ .Net, C# .Net). VB, not to offend anyone, we teach to the Mini-University students (Ages 10+) during the summer, its not taught at all in our Comp Sci department.

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As far as programming languages go, learn one. They'll never die. There's schools that still teach Fortran, Prolog, Ada (mine) as well as the more "common" (that means better known to the general public) languages.

I've done a little in Pascal, Ada, and Qbasic. I like Ada the most, as compiler errors are so helpful. The compiler is picky, but it is really helpful. (Missing semicolon in Line 3:15)

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Hello yaar...

Saw your mail and was happy tat u wanted to learn some thing... and i am an engineering student. I have many languages in my syllabus. as per my experience...i wud suggest you to do C first. Before going to C++ or VB.NET. Bcos the basics of C are important any where you go. Without C basics, you will be noting in the industry. so its always good to do C first. Get good grip over C. If possible, do Data Structures also. Then you can happily plan for JAVA and C++ simultaniously. then for VB.NET. One thing, We can never jump over any thing in the field of computers. Move over C is not just the thing to be skipped. This is my sincere advice. the rest is all your wish.

Bye Bye and Take care :lol:

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Interesting question. Since I have a lot of years and languages under my belt, I do not overly concern myself about which language is being used, though I have my preferences.

I think C++ is a good way to get a thorough grounding, and it is fully functional all the way to the advanced OO stuff. Java is a good way to start as well. I recommend getting the free eclipse development environment.

For C++, I recommend the MS .NET C++ IDE. I got that for about $120. Needless to say, it has plenty of .Net functionality. I think it is far and away the best option for windows development.

I agree that VB is not generally viewed as enterprise-capable, though I have rolled out plenty over the years.

C++ is viewed as a more difficult language than VB, so it pays more, and employers rightfully feel that if one has mastered C++, they can crank out VB code without much adjustment.

So, for just starting out, get focussed on being good with one language. Java has the certification programs which provide a credential. The java programmer exam was not trivial, but studying for it is a very good learning tool.

I agree that data structures is a good subject to look into, though most languages now have these objects (stacks, queues, etc.) implemented in libraries. It is a good exercise to code your own just to learn from it.

As far as learning the .NET engine, I don't know what the market for that is like.

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Josh
It is better to learn C or C++ or JAVA. Because these are the mother languages and if u master these language it will not take much time to learn other languages.

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>Because these are the mother languages and if u master these
>language it will not take much time to learn other languages.
Cool, so if I learn C, C++, or Java then I can pick up Lisp, Forth, or Assembly with no problem? What, pray tell, are these the mother languages of? There are several families of programming language. C, C++, and Java all fall under the family of ALGOL derivatives, and they all have a similar feel, so how can you expect to get good enough exposure to pick up languages that differ considerably from them?

Perhaps your argument in favor of those three should be that they're popular, useful, and have a huge source base to learn from. Of course, then you'll need to mention other languages with those attributes including Perl, Python, and PHP.

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Always a hot topic!!!

Which is the best language to learn and otherwise? Start with C, you can write unbelievably bad and undecipherable code with it. There is a huge amount of sample code out there from which to learn, mostly real old stuff with tons of strange looking header files from the cave days. As an added benefit there are many non-portable functions from compilers that no longer breathe.

If you survive this experience you will be ready for most anything, even C++ programming. The many include files will make your head spin though!

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hey about python or qbasic? so ez things...

Haha, QBasic... the language that rocks!
The Nibbles demo I had distracted me from learning it methinks....

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Like everyone I would advocate you learn C#.

Also like everyone I used to be hooked up to PHP /Python and other non-microsoft related technologies.

Eventually I had to give up my negative attitude against Microsoft and move to where the money was . i.e .NET

I have swallowed my pride and am now a misrosoft whore. Hell I am even gunning to become an MVP.

C# /.NET is the way forward

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Hi, can some one tell me what the best programming language is to learn at home? i am now 33 and just started college doing a Access course to get in to uni next year, i wish to go into computer science, and feel that i need to get some practise now.

thanks
TC

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OP:

As a college student, when I go to career fairs and similar events, and talk to employers, the languages that are most often mentioned are C++ and Java as far as non-Web development goes. I don't know about web development. . AJAX seems to be popular as well as the usuals.

Edited by BestJewSinceJC: n/a

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I agree with samaru here. It would be wiser to learn C++ first as it introduces the basic programming, if you know enough on c++ then you can choose to learn another language.

Edited by jingle_br: n/a

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hey Josh

i suggest you have to continue to learn .NET and its related software like Share Point also.

feel free to ask me

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