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i am an IT student maybe 1 1/2 year from now i will be graduated with bachelor degree if i will be luck, at this time i still confused what languages to study hard and to focus more that can help my carrier for the future,

now i ask your idea guys what language for me to study?

TNX_GodBless

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    Thread closed. It's attracting too much spam and too many signature spammers. @OP: Use the search function. There are more then enough threads on Daniweb already on this subject Read More

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there is no "best", each has its benefits and drawbacks based on what you actually want to do with them.

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It's hard to say - if impossible at all - what language may be essential for your carrier. It totally depends... on your future job profile. Besides i can almost guarantee that you will not learn in university/college such things that will be needed by your future employer. So you are slightly over-estimating question importance. Also it can be that your future job will need a language that you didn't met in university ! So you must prepare to learn any language by yourself on behalf of employer requirements.
So these things points to idea that you should be familiar enough with most languages which are taught in university. And finally, just my personal opinion,- you should know C language very well, because:
1. It is programming *classics*, which should know every educated developer.
2. It is most popular language. see:
http://www.tiobe.com/index.php/content/paperinfo/tpci/index.html
3. There are most code examples on net written in C or JAVA (based on google code search)
http://langpop.com/
4. Finally C (and C++) programs are fastest compared to other languages (except of course assembler), because they are *closer* to computer hardware than any other language is (yes, still assembler closer ;) ).
http://shootout.alioth.debian.org/u32/benchmark.php?test=all&lang=gcc&lang2=python3

So in my opinion make a VERY good start with C and later you will be able to branch to any required language.

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Well, it all depends on what you already know and what you are looking for.

If you are just starting out, maybe C might be too discouraging, and something like Python, for example, would be more fun to start. You can do some really cool stuff with Python even without knowing much. However, it might not happen that way.

It's true that every programmer should know C, because that is a classic, a foundation. However, since it's a low-level language it might discourage young programmers.

Java is also a great choice, since there are lots of documentation and is also a must for every programmers repertoire.

Summing up, even though you should know C, I think it is not wise to start with it. You will probably be better off with Java (you can easily implement some GUIs), Python (cool stuff xD) or even C++.

If you choose Java, I recommend you to take a look at the book "Head First Java", for Python just look in the internet for a lot of good examples and for C++ "Accelerated C++" is a must.

Cheers.

Edited by nunos: n/a

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It's true that every programmer should know C, because that is a classic, a foundation. However, since it's a low-level language [...]

Actually C is mid-level language, not low-level.

Summing up, even though you should know C, I think it is not wise to start with it. You will probably be better off with Java (you can easily implement some GUIs), Python (cool stuff xD) or even C++.

If you are arguing about language complexity, then I think C++ is not an option here - take a look at C language specification size and C++ specification size. You will see that there is needed a way MORE learning time to get used to C++ features than to C features. But i agree that C++ has nice STL library (and other stuff) which in many ways simplifies lower level C access functions.

Well what about other langs.- Python definitely simpler than C. (But also may have a bit more features than C). Java - don't know, maybe... Still i think that it is not good for beginner to start from OO approach (be it C++, JAVA, ... or..), because I think there is tendency if beginner gets used to OO approach - then it will be more harder for him/her to switch to non-OO approaches. For these reasons total beginner should start from completely non-OO language-> (ok we can skip C for first-timers) for example Pascal, Lua, ...

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Actually C is mid-level language, not low-level.

You're arguing over the definition of a subjective term whose meaning is relative to one's yardstick. Oh, I'm sorry, you're not arguing, you're merely contradicting. It's all about the supremacy of your opinion over others' opinions, isn't it. Or what is it?

C is a low-level language. You are wrong and I am right. The end.

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It's all about the supremacy of your opinion over others' opinions, isn't it.

Are you playing psychologist here ?

And yes - it is not so important how we will define C - high, mid, low, or whatever... So I take back my last opinion about mid-level.

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I am using html, css, and java. I think that html is best language.

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Dumber than a box of rocks (and a sig-spammer)
html is no programming language
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Thread closed. It's attracting too much spam and too many signature spammers.

@OP: Use the search function. There are more then enough threads on Daniweb already on this subject

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