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Hello all, my name is Corey, I am new to DaniWeb, and new to programming. I am very interested in software and java programming, to eventually make it into my profession. I am starting college in the Fall, and want to get a head start. The following post is going to be full of questions, concerns, and requests for information, I hope that you fine people can help me out and maybe give me some insight into this field.

(Keep in mind that I am brand new, and have barely even picked up a book on Visual Basic 2008)

[Questions:]

My first question is: How is video game programming different from other types of programming? Are there certain elements of programming that I would need to learn that would not already be involved in regular programming courses at colleges?

My second question is: Where should I get started? What language should I learn first, or are there multiple languages I should start with?

[Information Requests:]

Good free information sites for starting out in any of the languages related to this field.

Good starting points in general for someone who wishes to become a software engineer.

Good literature for purchase on these subjects for beginners.

Pointers for getting started and keeping interest.

Any other resources, tips, or information you may have or are willing to share.

As well as anything else I didn't think of here that you believe will be important for me starting out.

I greatly appreciate any and all information, please take the time to address some of my questions and requests, I thank you in advance.

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Last Post by BanneyHill
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Hello all, my name is Corey, I am new to DaniWeb, and new to programming. I am very interested in software and java programming, to eventually make it into my profession. I am starting college in the Fall, and want to get a head start.

The best way to get a head start is to go to http://docs.python.org/tutorial/ and start programming.

My first question is: How is video game programming different from other types of programming? Are there certain elements of programming that I would need to learn that would not already be involved in regular programming courses at colleges?

Yes. Program some video games, and you'll find out what you need to learn. Generally speaking, programming is not something a class will teach you. It's not like you can go to a class and get taught how to program. You might go to a class, but you'll end up being the one teaching yourself how to code.

My second question is: Where should I get started? What language should I learn first, or are there multiple languages I should start with?

Okay, I just answered that above.

Good starting points in general for someone who wishes to become a software engineer.

Programming. The only way to get decent at programming is by doing it. The only way to get good is by doing it. Start now. Go to http://docs.python.org/tutorial/ and download Python and start programming.

Good literature for purchase on these subjects for beginners.

There is none. Well, let me put it this way: If you're just starting, the best way is to go to the Python tutorial above and teach yourself Python by writing a bunch of Python programs that do things you find interesting. If you have questions about how to do things like make GUI's or whatever, then it often helps to ask questions to point you in the right direction, or to just search the docs yourself, or to find examples online.

Pointers for getting started and keeping interest.

You don't need to worry about keeping interest. If you aren't interested, you aren't interested. In general, though, if you get in a rut, try something a little different. There's more to life that writing programs that read and write from the console.

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1. Don't really worry about the language.

Think about it this way, the language is the mean, but programming is the thought process and that skill is almost indepent from the language. And that's what you need to learn. FYI, a good programmer will learn 95% of a programming language in a week or less.

Python is a good choice since the syntax is really simple giving you time to think about the programming rather than the programming language itself, besides allowing you to do some really cool stuff.

2. If you are into games programming, please be aware that you have a lot to learn making your own real game.

Of course, you can go grab a "Game Maker", but that won't be your own game and, besides, you won't understand half what you're doing.

Just start small and build up from there. Start by coding, in python, the "guess a number" game, the mastermind and things like that.

If you don't know it already, www.gamedev.net is the number one stop for game programming, I believe. Take a look.

Cheers.

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Thank you both, you both more or less suggested the same thing so that is where I'll begin. Not really much else to say I guess, I hope to see you guys in my later threads in this community, will be looking for more responses as well, although it seems like the general idea is the same.

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Im in uni right now...and cuz they're moving so slow, i've decided to go ahead and read other languages...
the first programming language i learnt was python. and i must admit, its a good language to learn at first. but it has its ups and downs:
ups:
it'll show you a little how other programming languages work, python is like a subset of every programming language (so to speak). not in a features way, but rather a programming way (u'll understand when you take it).
its also too easy to the extent that u'll feel like programming is nothing to you, and that you can do much better, which is good, cuz it give u confidence and hope!

downs:
python is too easy, so when you come to harder languages you might get mixed up a little bit, and you might miss python.
i wanna learn assembly language but since i've started with python, went to C++ and now on C#, assembly is kinda hard cuz im not used to such programming ways, u get me?????, but i'll study it soon

anyway, thats just my opinion...every1's different!,,,,but one thing i can say....its not the language...its the skill!!!!

tips:
python is a good language, but it can't be used on all platforms...
C# is kinda like python, but is faster and better, and can work on most platforms...
C++ (and C) is the core language of most big programs these days...your OS is made mostly using C++ and C.
assembly, well that the main language....everything is converted to that, then to binary...if u can learn it, then i advise you do!

GOOD LUCK WITH YOUR STUDIES!

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Yes you can start this as your career but remember that the market is full of programmers but they also need some expert programmers so you have to work hard to reach at the expert level.

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