I'd like to find an algorithm book that's either meant to be or good to use as a reference.

By "reference" I mean that it contains all the basic algorithms (machine-learning algorithms especially) like QuickSort, Logistical Regression, Clustering. Preferably, including both the mathimicatical definition as well as psuedo code, or even real code (preferably in Java, Python, or C++, but any code is better than none).

I just want a book that I can crack open whenever I need to implement a certain algorithm. Internet recources on algorithms are suprisingly sparse, especially compared to "regular" programming.

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Internet recources on algorithms are suprisingly sparse, especially compared to "regular" programming.

Ironically, my go-to quick reference for algorithms and data structures is a website. It's the most complete reference in …

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Well, here are a few internet resources first that you might have missed.

Here's a bunch: https://github.com/vhf/free-programming-books/blob/master/free-programming-books.md#professional-development .

Also, I would take a look at MIT press, as well as resources other universities have posted online.

This is more focused on structures, but heres someones notes from my class: http://notes.cthomson.ca/dl/latest/cs240.pdf .

Here's another good place to look at: http://www.cs.sunysb.edu/~algorith/ .

I've heard a few good things about http://www.amazon.ca/Data-Structures-Algorithms-Alfred-Aho/dp/0201000237 , and the ToC looks like it goes through most of the foundations.

Look up Knuth's "The Art of Computer Programming". Now 4 volumes (v.4 took a long time to come out - I just got it last year). Covers sorting/searching and many other critical CS topics.

commented: The absolute best +14

Internet recources on algorithms are suprisingly sparse, especially compared to "regular" programming.

Ironically, my go-to quick reference for algorithms and data structures is a website. It's the most complete reference in a single location to the best of my knowledge, and tends to be recently updated. Not perfect, but a book certainly won't be either. You'll learn to use multiple references in such cases.

commented: Thanks for the link. NIST does some good and important stuff. +0

i need a code for spherical coordinates in a 3D with 2 # for loop #
for example i have this:
for(int i=0; i<360; i=360/n) and
for(int i=0; i<180; i=180/n)

for example i have this web page here : http://mathworld.wolfram.com/SphericalCoordinates.html

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