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Hi everyone,
I know you must have heard this from every one else but i need some guidence on my final year project...... I have to develop a software to do e- ordering on a fast food store, i need help on whats the best programming language i can use to do this

thanks

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Last Post by peterbyrne
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I would recommend a .NET language - Personally I prefer c#, but you can use any .NET language since all .NET languages compile to the same Intermediate code (IL) that is interpretted by the CLR (Common Language Runtime) - At the moment there are about 10.000 classes/interfaces available in .NET so you should be able to find classes which will allow you to do just about anything you want.
You are restricted only by your imagination.
A word of advice from an experienced developer: Plan your project carefully before you write any code at all. It will save you alot of time in the end!

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Or you could stay away from .NET so you have cross platform compatability and go with C++, C, Pascal, even Real Basic.

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Just curious to know what platforms are not capable of installing the .NET framework?

Easier to ask what platforms can.

Windows XP & I believe Windows 2000.

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Easier to ask what platforms can.

Windows XP & I believe Windows 2000.

You are a politicion - You answer a question by posing a different question and not answering the original question

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Easier to ask what platforms can.

Windows XP & I believe Windows 2000.

You are a politicion - You answer a question by posing a different question and not answering the original question

Excuse me? I answered the reverse of the question which, using the commutative property of mathmatics, answers the original question. So I must be a mathematician. Either that or list 200+ platforms that can't handle .NET -- which I would argue does not answer the question because no one would be able to accurately list them all. I therefore chose to list all that could instead, implying none of the others could.

If you have a problem with that, please explain why.

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I detect just a little .NET hostility here. I guess you must be one of the members of the "lets all hate Microsoft club". Thats a rather tiresome debate that has been running for years and will probably do so for many more to come and is something I shall leave to others.

Meanwhile, back to the topic of this thread which was you may remember posted by an up and coming developer who wanted to possibly develop an e-commerce type application for a final-year project. An application of this type requires interaction with a web-server, web-pages and a database. Now for rapid application development of an application of this type I would suggest that ASP.net using whatever .NET language the developer is most comfortable with is one of the best routes to follow. Another alternative might be Java.

I would definitely not suggest C++, C or Pascal. I have no experience of Real Basic so I will have to bow to you greater knowledge.

Incidentally, any platform which can convert from IL to native machine code can use the .NET framework.
That is the whole point of IL. If a .NET application is a 'PURE' .NET application in that 1) It is Safe Code (No pointers) 2) All managed code. 3) Free of P/Invoke (Platform Invoke) then the operating system is irrelevant.

Since IL is generic, it is NOT tied to any CPU or any hardware platform. I do agree with you that at the moment it is only fully supported by the Windows platform but it is already possible for IL to run on Linux - Have you heard of Mono? - JIT compilation to native code from IL will be supported by many more platforms within a few years.

Compare the age C/C++ was born around the early 1970's - it still has its place (and always will in certain areas) but it was born, it blossomed and will over the next few years begin to wither and die. It had a good innings 30+ years is pretty good for a programming language indeed and as I said it will remain a force for a while yet.

Compare it to .Net which is still a baby by comparison only four years old and there is already a high demand for developers using .NET languages - just search the job market to confirm this assertion. Businesses want .NET developers.

Now if I was doing my final year project I would look to the future and would not see it in C or C++. Sure legacy code will be around for many years and I have no doubt will keep me in work for many more years yet but lets face it who still programs in what was once the de facto business language COBOL?

Things change with the passage of time and most of us move on :-)

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I detect just a little .NET hostility here. I guess you must be one of the members of the "lets all hate Microsoft club". Thats a rather tiresome debate that has been running for years and will probably do so for many more to come and is something I shall leave to others.

You have a very odd way of interpreting my response to your question. All I said is there are many platforms (O/S). And the only ones that can handle .NET are Windows XP and 2000. Please reread my posts and stop lookig for hostility towards M$. You stated one side. For completeness I stated another. You asked a followup question, I answered it, which was .NET has limited platforms available. C/C++ is on many more platforms, as well as PHP. I answered your question without errors -- unless you know of other platforms besides the two I mentioned. If so, please inform the rest of us.

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word of warning, i used asp.net and visual web developer to do my it couresework but the damn examiners used suse machines so they gave me a crap maek as they couldnt moderate it

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Quote "unless you know of other platforms besides the two I mentioned. If so, please inform the rest of us. "

Be informed

http://news.zdnet.co.uk/software/developer/0,39020387,39154054,00.htm

http://www.mono-project.com/Mono:About

regards

Although not an accurate answer (.NET is still only on Windows -- my point -- Mono is a clone and is not officially .NET. Picky but true), Mono looks like an interestig alternative. I find it curious that they have an Oberon compiler. Didn't know O had much of a following -- obviously it does.

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