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Of course. Do it as a hobby. However, doing it as a hobby and as a daily job are two VERY different things.

If you want to create games, you don`t have to recreate whole engine from scratch. Just use some well-known free alternative (Ogre/...) and concentrate your efforts on gameplay. It`s gonna take at least one year to accomplish anything partially meaningful, but if you really want it, it shouldn`t be an issue.

eheheh....Thanks WTF4096, 1 year is really not a issue.

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Well, if you want to learn engine programming, there`s no better way than to get your hands dirty working on your first game and working on the engine at the same time. Of course, you can`t get all of your class design correctly the first time, since you have no idea what should be in such an engine. And not even second/third time. But you`ll learn a lot along the way, if your motivation is strong.

However, if creating actual game is more important to you, don`ty waste time reinventing the wheel and just use any of the available free engines (Irrlicht, ogre, ...).

JUst be prepared that things go on slowly at the beginning and you might be unhappy if you spend 3-4 weekends and there`s barely something worth talking about. That`s the unfortunate truth about gamedev - it`s extremely time-consuming and slow compared to regular SW.


Although I`m currently not in gamedev industry anymore, I still devote hefty chunk of my free time to 3D programming. You can`t just throw away those many years of engine programming, so it seems...

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Well, if you want to learn engine programming, there`s no better way than to get your hands dirty working on your first game and working on the engine at the same time. Of course, you can`t get all of your class design correctly the first time, since you have no idea what should be in such an engine. And not even second/third time. But you`ll learn a lot along the way, if your motivation is strong.

However, if creating actual game is more important to you, don`ty waste time reinventing the wheel and just use any of the available free engines (Irrlicht, ogre, ...).

JUst be prepared that things go on slowly at the beginning and you might be unhappy if you spend 3-4 weekends and there`s barely something worth talking about. That`s the unfortunate truth about gamedev - it`s extremely time-consuming and slow compared to regular SW.


Although I`m currently not in gamedev industry anymore, I still devote hefty chunk of my free time to 3D programming. You can`t just throw away those many years of engine programming, so it seems...

soo it seems?

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I wanted to say, that it`s impossible to stop with game/engine programming altogether, even if you`re not doing it proffesionally anymore.

You can have periods of several months when you`re burnt out and won`t touch the code with the longest pole but you`ll always get back to it. It`s a living, breathing beast that asks to be tamed ;-)

There are always new effects to be checked, new ways of ding same thing, but more effeciently.

You can start playing with proceduraly generated terrains/buildings. And you can`t possibly finish polishing it during your lifetime :-)

Last year I wanted to do a "little upgrade" of my terrain renderer and have spent last year just playing with the terrain renderer.
In the meantime, Crysis is out, so I have to do a "little upgrade" again :-)

While the gamedev job itself is ugly and hard, the hobby is extremely rewarding, namely due to the fact, that the final product hasn`t been a work of hundreds humanoids/zombies, but just a work of you and your artist - meaning you can still create a nice 3D game just with two people - you as a coder and one dedicated artist. I`m intentionally omitting musician since there are thousands of free music files all over internet, along with sound effects.
And, if you went for some 3rd person game (e.g. RPG), you could do quite well even without an artist - if you spent $100 for fully animated charcaters, you could start playing with some characters right away.
For terrain, there are many art packages that can generate a terrain for you. And finding basic 3D props like barrels/crates is a question of half an hour worth of googling.

So, you can create a fully playable demo just as a coder with art assets from the internet. They might not match visually very well, but that`s easy to fix, once you have a demo - since at that time, many artists will want to join your project, seeing you`ve gone pretty far just by yourself.

And the message ? Forget the job, but enjoy the hobby ;-)

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I wanted to say, that it`s impossible to stop with game/engine programming altogether, even if you`re not doing it proffesionally anymore.

You can have periods of several months when you`re burnt out and won`t touch the code with the longest pole but you`ll always get back to it. It`s a living, breathing beast that asks to be tamed ;-)

There are always new effects to be checked, new ways of ding same thing, but more effeciently.

You can start playing with proceduraly generated terrains/buildings. And you can`t possibly finish polishing it during your lifetime :-)

Last year I wanted to do a "little upgrade" of my terrain renderer and have spent last year just playing with the terrain renderer.
In the meantime, Crysis is out, so I have to do a "little upgrade" again :-)

While the gamedev job itself is ugly and hard, the hobby is extremely rewarding, namely due to the fact, that the final product hasn`t been a work of hundreds humanoids/zombies, but just a work of you and your artist - meaning you can still create a nice 3D game just with two people - you as a coder and one dedicated artist. I`m intentionally omitting musician since there are thousands of free music files all over internet, along with sound effects.
And, if you went for some 3rd person game (e.g. RPG), you could do quite well even without an artist - if you spent $100 for fully animated charcaters, you could start playing with some characters right away.
For terrain, there are many art packages that can generate a terrain for you. And finding basic 3D props like barrels/crates is a question of half an hour worth of googling.

So, you can create a fully playable demo just as a coder with art assets from the internet. They might not match visually very well, but that`s easy to fix, once you have a demo - since at that time, many artists will want to join your project, seeing you`ve gone pretty far just by yourself.

And the message ? Forget the job, but enjoy the hobby ;-)

eheheh Thanks wtf4096, thats a wonderful message!

I like your guidelines and had interesting time with you.... :)

But I feel sad about me :( , I am jus liking and liking the gamedev but not starting it.......

my fault!

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