0

Hi, first post here.
I've just taught myself C++ by reading a couple of books.
Even though I haven't really created any of my own programs yet, I feel that I 'get' C++ and programming.
I want to my first program to be a video game, or something that just exhibits the very basic concepts of a game (like Atari style game), something simple.
From what I've dug up on the internet, Allegro might be a good library(?), but all I've ever used is Windows. Can I even use something like Allegro on Windows? I mean, sure the game itself might run on Windows, but can I write the code in Windows and still use Allegro?
Also, do you advise that I stay away from Allegro since I am a beginner. If so, what should i do to write a simple game. Preferable a rpg.

3
Contributors
12
Replies
13
Views
7 Years
Discussion Span
Last Post by eggberto
0

Hi and welcome to the business - and welcome to DaniWeb :)

Well I hear a lot of newbies go with Allegro, but 2 years ago when I first time wanted to make a video game, I found Allegro confusing - maybe it was just me, but I never got it running.

I'm very satisfied with the Ogre library (www.ogre3d.org) - It's a fully featured crossplatform rendering library, that means it is advanced. They have very friendly forums - and some beginners tutorials I believe.

I started with something more simple than a video game though, I did some useful applications for my own needs - Developed almost exact copies of some simple software that I didn't want to buy for a few dollars.

Also made a chat program to chat with some friends, was fun :P

Anyway, if you want some help getting started, I could assist you and explain how to set up your environment over IM? :) *limited offer :o*

0

Also, I just found that I forgot to answer your questions...
I believe Allegro is cross platform, so should work under Windows..
To make an RPG you have to sit down and write some flowcharts... Think of your code like a big company...
There is the main office where all orders originates from, then there is a graphics department, ai department and so on... If you have a big blackboard available, that's a good place for writing thoughts.

Also you ofc need to figure what your game should feature, and what to do for graphics (3d graphics requires a 3d modeller, if you aren't one yourself - otherwise paint will do :P).

Start out simple - Like a game where you have to move from one spot to another and then you win. Try something like that, when you succeed, expand...

0

Thanks. Yes, I think I'll work towards small goals like moving a character to one side of the screen to the next side first, then keep on adding stuff as I go.
I "think" I can code everything, my only problem is learning the graphics/sound part. What I've learned from C++ has taught me nothing about graphics, but then again that comes from a graphics library like Allegro. I think I'll start out 2D and then move to 3D graphics. That's another reason why Allegro interested me, 2D.
I'll keep you guys posted on my progress.

0

Also, if you're indeed without any real knowledge or experience programming, picking up game programming to start with is not a good idea.
It's one of the most complex areas of programming overall, requiring expertise in a multitude of fields that are the trickiest things of all (like high performance animation and artificial intelligence).

0

Also, if you're indeed without any real knowledge or experience programming, picking up game programming to start with is not a good idea.
It's one of the most complex areas of programming overall, requiring expertise in a multitude of fields that are the trickiest things of all (like high performance animation and artificial intelligence).

True, but the game I'm looking to create will be of the simplest nature. Atari style AI/animation. I'm not looking to create something that rivals Halo. So... I'm hoping that makes it a lot easier.

If I were to just test out the concepts of working with graphics/sounds for the first time. Do you recomend any libraries to test out for the first time (not for gaming, just to learn how to work with graphics/sounds libraries)?

0

I downloaded Allegro. I unzipped the files. There are bunch of files/folders. I pictured in my head one file that I reference in my code. So... do I now setup this stuff or do I just reference the folder it's in. I'll continue to read thru the many readme files in each folder but it's just confusing me more. I'll eventually read thru all of it and figure out what to do next, but this is bigger hurdle than I thought it would be. I wish they made an easy to read install file instead assuming you know how. :@ Maybe it's there and I'm too frustrated to see it right now.

0

Part of the setup for Allegro for Dev-C++ (I use) reads as follows:
Setting up Dev-C++ to build Allegro
Note: we assume that the complete version of the Dev-C++ environment (i.e with the bundled MinGW compiler) is used. If you use instead Dev-C++ as a mere IDE on top of an already installed MinGW compiler, follow the instructions given in the previous section.

The procedure is as follows:

1. Make sure you have a working Dev-C++ installation. You can download the complete version from 'http://bloodshed.net/dev/devcpp.html'.

2. Get the DirectX SDK: go to Tools\Check for Updates/Packages... and install the DirectX package. Close Dev-C++.

3. Add 'c:\DevCpp\bin' to the beginning of your PATH environment variable. Optionally, set the environment variable MINGDIR to 'c:\DevCpp'. If you use Windows 9x, you can add the lines

PATH=c:\DevCpp\bin;%PATH%
set MINGDIR=c:\DevCpp
to your 'c:\autoexec.bat' file and reboot. If you use Windows ME, you can run 'msconfig', select the 'Environment' tab, then modify PATH and add MINGDIR. If you use Windows NT/2k/XP, you can open the Control Panel, click the 'System' applet, the 'Advanced' tab and finally the 'Environment' button, then modify PATH and add MINGDIR.

Test the installation by typing the following on the command line: 'gcc -v'. The answer should be similar to:

Reading specs from ../lib/gcc-lib/mingw32/3.2/specs
Configured with: ../gcc/configure --with-gcc --with-gnu-ld
--with-gnu-as --host=mingw32 --target=mingw32 --prefix=/mingw
--enable-threads --disable-nls --enable-languages=f77,c++,objc,ada
--disable-win32-registry --disable-shared
Thread model: win32
gcc version 3.2 (mingw special 20020817-1)
If you don't know how to open a terminal, you can click on 'Start -> Run' then type "command". Under Windows 2k/XP, you should type "cmd" instead.

I'm confused by one part. What do I put in the path?

My current path reads, "%SystemRoot%\system32;%SystemRoot%;%SystemRoot%\System32\Wbem;C:\Program Files\Common Files\Roxio Shared\DLLShared\;C:\Program Files\Diskeeper Corporation\Diskeeper\;C:\Program Files\QuickTime\QTSystem\;"

So should I add, "C:\DevCpp\bin;" to the end of that?

0

So frustrating. I edited the path, but when I went to test the installation by typing the following on the command line: 'gcc -v', I got nothing.
I put allegro into C:\Dev-Cpp\bin, then edited the path to that. Also after I "gcc- v" command prompt says " 'gcc -v' is not recognized as an internal or external command, or operable program or batch file.

0

The path you are setting must be the directory containing "gcc.exe" - otherwise you can't execute gcc directly from the cmd. Otherwise you have to write the full path to execute the the gcc program.

0

The path you are setting must be the directory containing "gcc.exe" - otherwise you can't execute gcc directly from the cmd. Otherwise you have to write the full path to execute the the gcc program.

Ok thanks, I'll try that.
I think part of my problem 'might' be that I'm using Bloodshed Dev-C++. Maybe I should try learning Visual C++ free edition.

This topic has been dead for over six months. Start a new discussion instead.
Have something to contribute to this discussion? Please be thoughtful, detailed and courteous, and be sure to adhere to our posting rules.