:mad: :mad: :( :( I've been trying to write this program that is suppose to read in a text file manipulate in and give the following out put infact here is the question

Implement a program that uses a form-letter template to generate form letters. Your program should read in a form-letter template from a file. The form-letter template has "holes" in it that are to be filled in with user-entered values. The holes are represented by a pair of @ signs. For example, suppose this is read in from a form-letter template file:

Congratulations, @@! You've just won @@!
To collect, please send $100 to

And suppose the user enters these two values for the two @@ holes:

Raheel Azhar
a new house

Your program should then print this form letter:

Congratulations, Raheel Azhar! You've just won a new house!
To collect, please send $100 to
:mad:

this is what i have so far but all i get is compilation errors

#include <iostream>
#include <string>


using std::cout;
using std::cin;


class FormLetter
{
public:
string letterTemplate;


//private:
void generateLetter();
};


FormLetter::FormLetter(string fname)
{


letterTemplate = fname;


f.open("letterTemplate", ios::in);
f.close();


}


void generateLetter()
{
string input;
int count = 0;
++count;
while(count <4)
{
getline(letterTemplate,'@');
cout << "Enter insertion text: " << endl;
cin >> input << endl;
letterTemplate.insert(find_first_of '@', input);
generateLetter();
cout << letterTemplate << endl;


}
}


int main()
{
FormLetter formLetter1("letterTemplate.txt");
formLetter1.generateLetter();
return 0;
}

please help

Edited 3 Years Ago by Nick Evan: Fixed formatting

What kinds of compile errors?

I imagine it complains about these lines:

using std::cout;
using std::cin;

try just "using std;" instead.

and you make a constructor like this:

FormLetter::FormLetter(string fname)

but it isn't in the class definition; try adding "FormLetter(string fname);" after "public:" in the FormLetter class.

void generateLetter()

needs to be like this:

void FormLetter::generateLetter()

and so on; the compiler should be pointing out the line number that has a problem and a general idea of what the problem is....

I think your question is about c++ ... so it should be posted in c++ forum ... you'll get replies there.

I imagine it complains about these lines:

using std::cout;
using std::cin;

Why?

try just "using std;" instead.

ITYM

using namespace std;

Except in 'toy' programs, you really don't want to grab the whole namespace -- doesn't that kind of defeat the purpose of the namespace?

What kinds of compile errors?

I imagine it complains about these lines:

using std::cout;
using std::cin;

try just "using std;" instead.

and you make a constructor like this:

FormLetter::FormLetter(string fname)

but it isn't in the class definition; try adding "FormLetter(string fname);" after "public:" in the FormLetter class.

void generateLetter()

needs to be like this:

void FormLetter::generateLetter()

and so on; the compiler should be pointing out the line number that has a problem and a general idea of what the problem is....

thanks for the reply I will try this I am more familiar with java
so thats why I am having a few headaches

i am also a new member to this site
so I appreciate any help i can get

Unless you HAVE TO use specific code, this works GR8!
(Sorry if its a little to late!) :cool:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <string.h>
int main()
{
	char name[50];
	char item[50];
	char exit[10];
	printf("What is your name?\n\a");
	gets(name);
	printf("What is one thing you REALLY want?\n\a");
	gets(item);
	printf("Congratulations, %s! You just won %s!\nTo collect, please send 100$ to California.\n(Press enter to exit)",name,item);
	gets(exit);
	return 0;
}

Attached is the compiled exe in a zip file.

Attachments

Unless you HAVE TO use specific code, this works GR8!

:rolleyes:Program for more than a couple days before you start teaching.

:rolleyes:Program for more than a couple days before you start teaching.

Hey now. Be nice.

If there's something wrong with what he's posted, wouldn't it be more helpful to point out what's the problem/.

Come on, I was just trying to help. I have been programming in various languages for about three years, I am just new to C (I have been learning it for a month, but I got the compiler a week ago. I have known Dr Scheme for about nine months, PBasic for three years, and have used National Instruments Labview for two years.)
Besides, it works, doesn't it?
I know there is a better way to do it, but the way I described and compiled works.

I do understand, though, that my way does not fit the parameters set by the assignment. I will read more carefully next time. Although it completes the task, my program does not use files or forms. Sorry!

Program for more than a couple days before you start teaching.

Hey now. Be nice.

If there's something wrong with what he's posted, wouldn't it be more helpful to point out what's the problem/.

There is one function that should be avoided at all costs -- gets. Millions of Google hits can tell you why. But I can provide links if you'd like. Any program that contains one of these constructs stinks of a C newbie:


  • void main()
  • gets(string);
  • fflush(stdin);

Unless you HAVE TO use specific code, this works GR8!
(Sorry if its a little to late!)

#include <stdio.h>
     #include <string.h>
     int main()
     {
     	char name[50];
     	char item[50];
     	char exit[10];
     	printf("What is your name?\n\a");
     	gets(name);
     	printf("What is one thing you REALLY want?\n\a");
     	gets(item);
 	printf("Congratulations, %s! You just won %s!\nTo collect, please send 100$ to California.\n(Press enter to exit)",name,item);
     	gets(exit);
     	return 0;
 }

The original code was C++, for which different methods are used for input and output. And this code uses the most dangerous function in the C standard library as an "improvement". And the last one also uses a reserved identifier -- the name of a standard library function.

Besides, it works, doesn't it?
I know there is a better way to do it, but the way I described and compiled works.

That is the most dangerous way to code: it "works". (By accident, not by design.)

It is never safe, but it "works".

Sometimes the only way to capture someone's attention is to be a little bit of an ass. Try not to take it personally. Try to take it as constructive criticism without wiggle room.

You got my attention. Dont worry, I wont be posting anything that implies my knowledge of anything for a few months now, except maybe for DrScheme. Thanks! :mrgreen:

edit: BTW, what should I use instead? :?:

instead of

gets(whatever string/char?);

What command should I use?
(I forgot to be specific in previous reply, and I already used my edit on it.)

This article has been dead for over six months. Start a new discussion instead.