[ATTACH=RIGHT]22199[/ATTACH]Ever wondered just how many domain names there are on the Internet? DaniWeb has, and can reveal the answer as being an almost astonishing 215 million worldwide. According to global Internet infrastructure provider and domain registrar Verisign, more than five million domain names were added to the total during the second quarter of this year alone, which represents a growth rate of 2.5 percent above the previous three months. To put that into some perspective, that's a year on year growth in the number of Internet domains of 8.6 percent or some 16.9 million domains. If you were to look …

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With 2009 coming to an end, it's that time of year when security experts start predicting what the (very near) future will hold in terms of likely threat landscapes. One has bucked the trend of just picking on botnet growth and SEO poisoning, although both are on its list, and instead highlighted the dangers of cloud computing and non-Latin domain names. In a report predictably called Predictions 2010, [URL="http://www.m86security.com/"]M86 Security[/URL] reveals its expectations for Web and messaging-based threats for the coming year based upon extensive research into current threat over the past year coupled with an analysis of the major …

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The last time we asked that question here at DaniWeb was back in June 2009 when the Internet was, apparently, [URL="http://www.daniweb.com/news/story220586.html"]183 million big[/URL]. Of course, it is bigger now, but not actually by that much if the new figures from Internet infrastructure services provider VeriSign are anything to go by. With the 25th birthday of the .com Top Level Domain fast approaching, it would appear that the Internet is now 192 million big. In the newly published [URL="http://www.verisign.com/domain-name-services/domain-information-center/industry-brief/index.html"]Domain Name Industry Brief[/URL], VeriSign reveals that 2009 came to a close with a base of more than 192 million domain name registrations …

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Depending upon the level of your paranoia, Google is either attempting to take over the online world or simply trying to make it a better place in which to work and play. This latest announcement does nothing to clarify these already muddy waters. "As part of our ongoing effort to make the web faster" [URL="http://googleblog.blogspot.com/2009/12/introducing-google-public-dns.html"]says[/URL] Google Product Manager Prem Ramaswami "we're launching our own public DNS resolver". DNS, the Domain Name System that converts domain names that humans are happy with such as [url]www.daniweb.com[/url] into the Internet Protocol (IP) numbers such as 74.53.219.188 (type it into your browser and it …

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According to the VeriSign [URL="http://www.verisign.com/domainbrief"]Domain Report[/URL] for the second quarter of 2008 which has just been published, there were some 168 million domain name registrations across the Top Level Domain Names at the midpoint of the year. That represents a 22 percent increase over the same period last year, and up four percent over the first quarter of 2008. Country code top level domains were also up, 27 percent when viewed as a year on year figure to a total of 65 million domain names. If you break the domain name industry down into the largest top level domains when …

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Apple has grabbed lots of headlines this week, some for things it has done, others for things done to it. Of all the major Apple products, only the iPod has escaped mention. With perhaps the potential to affect the most people is the deal announced this week with AT&T to extend exclusivity with the iPhone's only service provider until 2010. According to a [URL=http://www.usatoday.com/tech/wireless/phones/2008-07-31-att-iphone-stephenson-apple_N.htm?loc=interstitialskip]story Thursday in USA Today[/URL], the two have conspired to ditch Sprint, T-Mobile and Verizon customers, which expected to have access to the apple of every geek's eye after the end of 2008. AT&T made the deal …

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I guess you could call it karma. HD Moore's company, BreakingPoint, found that traffic was being diverted to a scammer Google page. This kind of cache poisoning attack on DNS servers is not unusual, however this particular case was because HD Moore is the man who created the Metasploit hacking toolkit. What's more this kind of poisoning was recently made a lot easier than it used to be, in no small measure thanks to the HD Moore Metasploit project being the first to release software that exploits the new technological method for doing so. According to [URL="http://www.pcadvisor.co.uk/news/index.cfm?newsid=13879&"]PC Advisor[/URL] it would …

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Halvar Flake is a researcher. Here's how he describes himself on [URL=http://www.blogger.com/profile/12486016980670992738]his blog[/URL]: "I like simple things. And complex things. And drinking beer with people like Fyodor Yarochkin. I like South America. And some parts of Asia, specifically Kuala Lumpur. I like French. I like Spanish. I'd like to like more languages." Yesterday, based on some of his research, maybe after drinking a bunch of beer, perhaps with someone like Fyodor Yarochkin, he posted a [URL=http://addxorrol.blogspot.com/]hypothesis[/URL] on how to exploit a security vulnerability of the Domain Name Server system, which governs the millions of server names on the Internet. He …

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If you're visiting a known site such as Google.com, you're perfectly safe, right? Wrong. New DNS vulnerabilities in Microsoft's Windows 2000 and 2003 severs could potentially allow a DNS server to get hijacked, and redirect a user to a completely different site than they expected to see. The vulnerability exists in the RPC protocol (Remote Procedure Call), which is supposed to get services from other applications on the network. By using a basic stack overflow technique, hackers can compromise the target machine and gain access to the routing table. This becomes extremely dangerous. Cybercrooks could redirect a visitor to a …

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The biggest test of Internet homeland security went pretty much unnoticed this week. Yet it represents the most serious attack on the Internet itself for five years. On the 6th February a 12 hour concerted Distributed Denial of Service attack took place aimed at the DNS root servers that manage global Internet traffic. DNS is the Domain Name System that translates between the easy to remember URLs we all use, such as daniweb.com, and the much less memorable underlying IP address in numeric form. Think of it as being a huge distributed database system and you are pretty much in …

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Well, maybe for a week or three anyway. That is the theory being bandied around wherever more than three geeks assembly for longer than 10 minutes, or so it seems. Perhaps it is just the company I keep. However, is there any merit in the idea that Vista, and specifically its support for IPv6, will cause the Internet to stutter and possibly even fall over? Well there is certainly a good basis for the story that is circulating, because it came about after one of the people on the original team that invented the Domain Name Server system, Paul Mockapetris, …

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The End.