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Last Post by John A
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More or less,

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

OpenGL

OpenGL (Open Graphics Library) is a standard specification defining a cross-language cross-platform API for writing applications that produce 2D and 3D computer graphics. The interface consists of over 250 different function calls which can be used to draw complex three-dimensional scenes from simple primitives. OpenGL was developed by Silicon Graphics Inc. (SGI) in 1992[1] and is widely used in CAD, virtual reality, scientific visualization, information visualization, and flight simulation. It is also used in video games, where it competes with Direct3D on Microsoft Windows platforms (see Direct3D vs. OpenGL).

Google is a wonderful thing isn't it? :-D

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Open GL competes with Direct3D, but DirectX is slightly different from Direct 3D.

Here is a link to another forum where it is discussed.
rtsoft.com/forums

Differences seem to be minor as far as I can tell.

HTH, Tom

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OpenGL is graphic library, and DirectX is not only graphic library but also cover input, sound, network and many more. Then OpenGL create something call OpenAL for sound library.

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OpenGL is graphic library, and DirectX is not only graphic library but also cover input, sound, network and many more. Then OpenGL create something call OpenAL for sound library.

So basically OpenGL, Dirct3D, and DirectX are all Corvettes,

DirectX just has A/C and a GPS nav system. :-/

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Direct3D is a part of DirectX.

There are other open-standards and open-source alternatives to DirectX, such as SDL www.libsdl.org and OpenAL for DirectSound and DirectSound3D

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>There are other open-standards and open-source alternatives to DirectX, such as SDL
Actually, SDL is just a wrapper library designed to abstract the details of graphics, sound, input, etc. Internally it will use DirectX or OpenGL to draw graphics, for example.

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