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Most of you reading this are probably going like "damnit! agaian!?!"

Sorry, but to tell you the truth ive already read about 6-8 threads on this exact topic, but they were kinda old. I decided to make a new thread to see if you guys have changed your minds in the past few months. Much of the stuff I've read is:
1. Alot of math
2. Can't get jobs easily
3. Don't work with computers much
4. Alot of math :p
5. Boring as hell

Im currently working in the IT industry in a mortgage company and I love it. We usually don't do anything unless there's a problem, and fixing the problems is nothing but simple point and click-type errors and reboots.

However, i am more interested in programming and find it fascinating. I've already started a bit of web programming via PHP. PHP is really convenient and I like coding in it. I've also gotten a C++ book and many C++ tutorials and know quite a bit on this topic as well. Programming seems fun and interesting, mainly due to the amount of "control" we have, if that's the right word for it.

Right now I'm getting late in turning in my applications for college. So I need an anwer quick :p

Also, if anyone lives in Michigan, what colleges/universities do you suggest for getting into this type of field?

MGM out

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Last Post by samaru
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same here i love computer science. well this semester was hard but thats what happens when you transfer to a university from a 2 year college where you dont have to study very hard. but im sticking with it adn i love it. :) o and im a junior if i would pass all my class this sememster i will be a senior. ;)

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Same with me, I'm still a junior myself, & it's no regret getting myself into this field~! Go for it~!

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Even though I've commented on this topic over a million times, I can't help it! I have to reply! :cool: have to say that my opinion still hasn't changed. I hate it as much, if not more than the first day of my freshmen year. Now only having one semester left for my bachelors and two minors, I can say that it has been a very torturing experience. I know that sounds a little bitter, but it's how I feel. The only reason why I stayed with it is because I know it's a degree that helps programmers. Currently, I'm a free lance web developer that deals with a lot of web languages, and I have to adapt to many application servers running different languages. After taking all my required computer science courses, and then some, only a small amount of the knowledge helps. A lot of the classes don't even apply, e.g. physics/chemistry/biology/calculus/philosophy.

Everything I learned to become a web developer I did myself. The word "HTML" was never uttered in any of my classes. No PHP, ASP, MySQL, SQL Server. Hell, only two of my classes had computers inside. In the rest, a computer wasn't even mentioned! All computer science classes that I expected to be practical or hands-on experience were in fact all theory. For example, my database class, consisted of just set theory. We learned normalizing using boolean logic and set theory symbols rather than the traditional E/R diagrams drawn in the real work place. I'm not saying that set theory is never used in the real world, but E/R diagrams are more mainstream and easier to grasp.

The math, depending on your skill, can get nasty. Most of the math is divided into calculus and logic. If you're going into it, I suggest you be fresh in those.

As far as jobs, it all depends on you. You don't even need a degree from college. If your skills are good enough, and you're persistent in the job hunt, you can find one without too much hassle. A degree gives you the edge though. It can give you the interview, but might not give you the job. The good thing about it is it might give you additional benefits such as promotions or higher pay. You might know this already, but never rely on the degree itself to get you your dream job. By itself, it never does. Remember that you learn the theory in school, and the practical on your own. A college will never teach you anything practical. You learn the tricks outside in the real world.

Boring? Oh yeah. Too me anyways. But look at the bright side, you'll develop a strong threshold for boredom. I now have the ability to listen to the dullest people on earth babble on and on about themselves with a look of interest on my face. Might be handy in the work place while you're brown nosing your boss. ;) One of the primary reasons why I decided to minor in Psychology and Business Computer Information Systems is to make college an interesting and exciting experience. If it weren't for those two types of classes, my brain would've been fried already.

If you're interested in web programming, you will not find it in computer science. The programming that is done in the class is for examining principles of abstract data types and algorithms.

Also, don't let everything I said bum you out. You might actually get a good professor that will make the class exciting. If you do, cherish it. Hug him/her and don't let go.

One last thing. If you're selecting a skill you want to excel at, make sure it's in demand. Go to multiple job search sites (dice.com, monster.com, hotjobs.com) and see what's in demand. See how much they pay. Last thing you want to do is invest time in being an expert in something no one has a need for.

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A Computer Science undergrad degree is different from a Computer Information Systems undergrad degree.
all we need to know

Someone please tell me if it's possible to minor in computer science,choose 1.internet programming and web design and 2.algorithm analysis and design.

If it's possible , there's not much match is it ? I feel sad for those intelligent pupils who have been discouraged by c.s.c majors' detailed description of math/theory torture.

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I have struggled with this question myself, and still do at times. I have come to the following conclusion.

I have found three different major motivations for college:

1.) Money

2.) Comfort and convenience of job security

3.) Doing what you want to do

If your in it for the Money, work toward an MBA or related.

If your in it for job security... well... good luck.

If what you like to do is Computer Science, Computer Information Systems or Management Information Systems, then you will have no problem. The hurdles you pass with regards to education will not be as difficult as you think. It takes time, but think about it - would you want to spend 4+ years working toward something you might grow to hate because you wanted to get paid? Or would you want to spend 4+ years going toward something that is more related to a passion of yours? Most likely if you have the work ethic, attitude, and passion for CS related work you find the job you are looking for and get paid more than you expected.

I have been a (*nix) Sys Admin since 17. Now 21, I feel the need of going to college to expand my knowledge and resume to go along with my experience in the work force. I am going to try some classes and get a feel for what is involved in the long haul for CS, CIS, and possibly MIS. You may want to do the same. Take note, _nothing is set in stone_. You can change your major at any time. College conatins several options and routes. Explore them, thats what they are there for.

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Well, in my 10 years in the workforce, one thing stands out. I am glad I got a BS in Comp Sci!

Most of my co-workers have gotten BA or BS in Information Technology and such or have gotten Certifications from Chubb and the like. The Comp Sci really prepares you for ANYTHING that might be thrown your way. Mind you, education never ends and I read like 7 trade mags just to keep up and try to dabble in all the new languages that come out. But its the foundation of the Comp Sci that enables me to talk and participate on many projects from Wireless to web to client/server applications. Even harware and networking.

Yes it is hard work. I hated probabilty theory and all those triple integrals (YUK!!!) but it has helped me immensly in troubleshooting and debugging because of the methodical nature of it all. I loved my simulations, system design, graphics modeling, and all my programming courses. Even my circuit course I liked. It was a broad education. It is definitely the way to go if you want to get a masters or doctorate.

My company has gone from DOS/Novell to Win 3.1/Novell to WinNT/Windows networking and now XP/Active Directory. Each step I made myself involved because I could. You really don't get that from the more specialized degrees.

As far as the work availability goes, the more urban the area the more IT jobs there are. Dont go looking for the six figures right away, cuz you WILL burn yourself out. There are probably more Civil IT jobs than anything. Big Cities = Big need to push paperwork. They may not pay as much, but generally have better benefits. You could stay at a place like that for 3-5 years to get good experience and move on to something bigger and better.

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This is where our opinions differ, Venjense. I, too, feel that a comp sci degree is a wonderful thing to have. Unfortunately I have a bunch of grievances about my school ... I haven't really liked any of the comp sci courses I've taken. I definitely think it's the school, however.

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College degrees are a must if you want to climb up the work ladder. It's also an image thing. You make a respectable company look bad if you're the VP with just a high school degree. It's a fact that people with important titles have better opportunities to get paid more.

As far as professors teaching computer science, I hate to say it, but I think it's their personality that destroys their teaching methods. I've had over 15 different computer science professors and they all have the same personality. They were passive, dry, and neurotic about their work. Where they differed was either in their snobbishness or humor. I know it's a stereotype, but it seems true. I'm a psychology minor as well, and in the process of going from one psyc professor to a csc professor, I could feel the difference like a punch in the face. All my psychology professors speak to you like they are willing to help you with anything you need, seem more alive, and involve you more. They make the class interesting and fun.

I don't think the school has anything to do with it because a lot of these professors have taught in different schools where I'm sure they acted the same.

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College degrees are a must if you want to climb up the work ladder. It's also an image thing. You make a respectable company look bad if you're the VP with just a high school degree. It's a fact that people with important titles have better opportunities to get paid more.

:p Well Homer Simpson never really passed high-school he has recently confessed to his son about that.He's popular too.

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quote:
As far as professors teaching computer science, I hate to say it, but I think it's their personality that destroys their teaching methods. I've had over 15 different computer science professors and they all have the same personality.

The personality of the professor will make a big differance no matter what subject they teach. Its a shame that you got 15 bad ones.

quote:
I don't think the school has anything to do with it because a lot of these professors have taught in different schools where I'm sure they acted the same.

I work at a small university and have been taking classes on the side. I will probably go with compsci as my major. Our compsci department consist of 4 professors, and I have had 3 of them so far. They all taught at other universities before coming here. I am lucky because they are good teachers and have good personalities. Also the class size are usually quite small.
I have also been taking classes from the Info Tech department and only a few of the professors are any good. That department probably has about 15 professors and a bunch of T/A's and freelance teachers.
The school and professors do make a difference in what you can learn from them. You will have to learn alot on your own to round out what interest you.

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Well, not all my professors were bad. Some were just "OK." It's up to the professor to make it interesting though. I don't care if you're teaching quantum mechanics, differential calculus, or even Rock Staring 101, it's the teacher's responsibility to make the class exciting. People like doing things that excite them and have fun at. The same reason professors do what they do. They chose something like Bubble Gum Chewing 101 because they like it. I think colleges are hiring professors strictly on credentials that have nothing to do with teaching, wish is a shame.

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:p Well Homer Simpson never really passed high-school he has recently confessed to his son about that.He's popular too.

Trying to decide who's more of an idiot. Homer or Peter Griffin. I think Peter wins. Man, do I love Family Guy.

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I am in my final semester. i was thinking i wasted 4 years until I got in Canon India. I will complete the 8th semester there as a trainee.
Job? well, shold get that as well.
math? hmm, not really much of it. though one does have to complete whole course in 6months what others complete in whole year, but hey you need to understand everything, that is all that is required.

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