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Don't laugh, but I've always wonder what you call those positions such as in the show 24, or CSI Miami, where they dig up information about a suspect or pinpoint their locations using computers, or analyze data. Computer forensic perhaps? Do those fields exist, and if so what kind of background or skills are required to land such a job?

Now this more ordinary - what do you call those guys who set up your laptop on the first day you start your job, or troubleshoot it? When what background or skillsets are required for those gigs?

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Last Post by Admiral Duane
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What I call them depends on who I'm talking to.
I like to stay on good terms with them after all, because I do need them, but more often than not they're highly annoying in their demands and actions so you have to vent to someone...

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It jobs means the jobs for the people who are related to the Computer field. It is the only field is much reliable then other fields..

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For the CSI:
How to Become a Crime Scene Investigator

1) Start by earning a degree in Crime Scene Investigation, Criminal Justice or a Physical Science (the most common degree is a bachelor's degree in criminal justice)
2) Some crime scene investigator jobs will require individuals to have police officer status or a higher education with a strong background in science.
3) Read more about a crime scene investigator career below and then request free information from schools that will give you the skills to pursue a career as a crime scene investigator.

A Crime Scene Investigator Career provides individuals with both an intellectual challenge as well as an exciting day to day job environment. As forensic technology continues to develop, crime scene investigator jobs are gaining in popularity. As a crime scene investigator, you can expect to be called on to the scene of complex crimes including those such as home invasion, burglary, armed robbery, homicides, and sexual assault. You must be prepared to work any time of the day or night whenever and wherever a crime occurs.

Crime Scene investigator jobs consist of a number of duties including assessing and processing the crime scene, gathering and transferring evidence, viewing autopsies, attending conferences and briefings with police agencies, preparing detailed crime reports, testifying in court, maintaining equipment, and continuing your education.

As for the computer part, they pretty much keep up with the latest technologies and utilize them to their advantage.

For the 'Ordinary' job:
Where I am from they are called Computer Technicians. Courses to follow through for this are A+, Network+, MCP...to name a few...you can get more information here:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Computer_repair_technician

Edited by maydhyam: Formatting

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For the CSI:
How to Become a Crime Scene Investigator

1) Start by earning a degree in Crime Scene Investigation, Criminal Justice or a Physical Science (the most common degree is a bachelor's degree in criminal justice)
2) Some crime scene investigator jobs will require individuals to have police officer status or a higher education with a strong background in science.
3) Read more about a crime scene investigator career below and then request free information from schools that will give you the skills to pursue a career as a crime scene investigator.

A Crime Scene Investigator Career provides individuals with both an intellectual challenge as well as an exciting day to day job environment. As forensic technology continues to develop, crime scene investigator jobs are gaining in popularity. As a crime scene investigator, you can expect to be called on to the scene of complex crimes including those such as home invasion, burglary, armed robbery, homicides, and sexual assault. You must be prepared to work any time of the day or night whenever and wherever a crime occurs.

Crime Scene investigator jobs consist of a number of duties including assessing and processing the crime scene, gathering and transferring evidence, viewing autopsies, attending conferences and briefings with police agencies, preparing detailed crime reports, testifying in court, maintaining equipment, and continuing your education.

As for the computer part, they pretty much keep up with the latest technologies and utilize them to their advantage.

For the 'Ordinary' job:
Where I am from they are called Computer Technicians. Courses to follow through for this are A+, Network+, MCP...to name a few...you can get more information here:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Computer_repair_technician

Thanks maydhyam, your reply is the best so far. Regarding the tv shows, I am talking more about the guys who use computers to look up information or pinpoint where the criminal is located rather than the guys who show up to the crime scene. I know it's part of the crime forensic department. But I need to know if those positions actually exist in real life, and what they are called specifically.

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Thanks maydhyam, your reply is the best so far. Regarding the tv shows, I am talking more about the guys who use computers to look up information or pinpoint where the criminal is located rather than the guys who show up to the crime scene. I know it's part of the crime forensic department. But I need to know if those positions actually exist in real life, and what they are called specifically.

Or if you watch the show 24, they're the guys who work at "CTU" who tracks down criminals and their movements from their desktops.

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Don't laugh, but I've always wonder what you call those positions such as in the show 24, or CSI Miami, where they dig up information about a suspect or pinpoint their locations using computers, or analyze data. Computer forensic perhaps? Do those fields exist, and if so what kind of background or skills are required to land such a job?

Now this more ordinary - what do you call those guys who set up your laptop on the first day you start your job, or troubleshoot it? When what background or skillsets are required for those gigs?

Hey John,

I can answer your second question and it is fairly general depending on what the company would call their IT Support-
I currently do Desktop support and one of the things that we do is deploy hardware be it Laptops, Desktops, Phones, Servers, Peripherals what ever this can be done in tandem with a Helpdesk/Service Desk ( the face and voice of your companies local IT support)-that can create all your accounts, emails, access etc.

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Thanks maydhyam, your reply is the best so far. Regarding the tv shows, I am talking more about the guys who use computers to look up information or pinpoint where the criminal is located rather than the guys who show up to the crime scene. I know it's part of the crime forensic department. But I need to know if those positions actually exist in real life, and what they are called specifically.

You see, what we are getting at is the fact that these are just computer literate person(s) using a very sophisticated piece of software/technology to be able to track down their target(s)...to my knowledge, there isn't an exact name for that job type (perhaps you can pay more attention to the show(s) to hear what these exact persons are being referred to as...and then google it)(as a side note...I do not look at 24, but I do look at CSI:Miami)...hope this helps!:-/

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When I was still looking for a job, I tried to search the internet for any companies that are looking for a computer science/computer engineering grad who focus on embedded systems. Saw one and the salary is averaging from $10K-$12k/mos but I was shocked when I've read the experience requirements, you must be in the military and have at least a 10 years experience in war. huh? immediately read the job description and you will be one of those who will develop the systems for ballistic missile. lol

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^^^ I would think that they would have recruited with in the military first before looking into the private sector.
I don't think it is too far fetched to find the right candidates to fit that description.

Mercenaries, security officers, worked for weapons companies, doing peace keeping roles in certain regions in the world, worked for the U.N...etc.

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