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Last Post by HiHe
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  • Well, there is the basic advice: go to your lectures, go to all the tutorials/labs, don't get behind. On a more specialised note, from my own experience when I was at uni, don't try to learn it all. With subjects like computer science, you can get surrounded by coding languages, … Read More

  • One huge mistake I see here too often is asking others to do your homework for you. Ask for help if you need it but make the effort yourself first. And don't wait until the last minute to get started. The rule of thumb is the first 90% of a … Read More

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Well, there is the basic advice: go to your lectures, go to all the tutorials/labs, don't get behind.
On a more specialised note, from my own experience when I was at uni, don't try to learn it all. With subjects like computer science, you can get surrounded by coding languages, frameworks, databases, etc and want to dive right in. That is a mistake. The IT field is HUGE and the amount of information staggering. Make sure you pass your exams first and if you have time, self study somethng related e.g. learn MS SQL or MYSQL if you aren't doing a database course (but don't try to learn MyQSL, MSSQL and Hadoop all at once).
So, relax, follow your teaching outline, be consistent and remember to take time out:) Enjoy!

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Good advise!
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One huge mistake I see here too often is asking others to do your homework for you. Ask for help if you need it but make the effort yourself first. And don't wait until the last minute to get started. The rule of thumb is the first 90% of a project takes the first 90% of the time. The last 10% takes the other 90% of the time.

Edited by Reverend Jim

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I'm currently a 3rd year Mathematics and Computer Science. My recommendation is to take your time (make sure you allocate enough time) in understanding your OWN answers to assignments.

"Getting an answer" or "it works, its good enough" is completly useless if you don't understand what's going on. In fact, I'd suggest in being competitive in understanding your own answers, and try to improve them.

If your doing a math assignment, rather then "finding an answer that seems to work", or doing some kind of hand-wavy proof, break it down into obvious (ie, markers don't need to see all of your algebra steps, but should be able to see any theorem you apply) steps, and explain your logic as you go along.

If your doing programming, don't write garbage and keep adding it until "it works" and move on. Take time to understand the problem. Take time to break it down in an understandable manner. Implement your solution cleanly, and if it doesn't work, figure out whats wrong before "producing" more code to fix it. Even play a bit code golf with your solutions once you have an answer, but keep it clean (so you don't sumbit overcomplicated code).

Finally, use the tutors, and use the books. The book will carry you though if you ever need facts or correct examples to work with. The tutors will take the "guesswork" out of assignements. That's what their there for.

Edited by Hiroshe

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attend all your courses do your homeworks and voila you'll be successful student
but it needs hard work wish ye the best

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Specialize in one area of IT and become a master. Don't try and be the jack of all trades.

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Learn the basics as best as you can! I can't express that enough. Gravitate towards a language or specialty that you find interest in and practice, practice, practice! Also don't be shy or intimidated to ask questions (this was my problem in college). Best of luck to you!

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