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Just a couple of days ago, Microsoft released Windows 8.1, a significant update to the operating system. It brings a slew of new features and improvements to the beleaguered software. Maybe you just updated your PC to the new version or you have a newly bought PC with Windows 8.1, you are pretty excited and can’t wait to take a little taste of it.

Before you start the epic journey, I can give you a brief summary of Windows 8.1 as some kind of tips for your consideration:

The good: Windows 8.1 adds many useful tweaks and fixes, including a new version of the missing Start button, better searching, the ability to boot directly to the desktop, and a much-improved app store. Plus, it's free for current Windows 8 users.

The bad: The split between the touch-friendly tiles and throwback desktop mode is still awkward, and the OS is hard to use without a touch screen. While welcome, the new Start button doesn't behave like the classic version, and the Windows app store still lacks serious software, especially for gamers.

Extra: There is one more thing I think you might want to listen to, No matter how fast your computers or OS might be when they're new, they all seem to get slower over time. That state-of-the-art PC or OS you bought last year might not feel like such a screamer after you install a dozen programs, load it with antispyware and antivirus tools, and download untold amounts of junk from the Internet. The slowdown might happen so gradually that you hardly notice it, until one day you're trying to open a program or file and wonder,"What happened to my poor PC?" This may let you down a little bit but it’s better if I remind you in advance, in the meantime you can’t help wondering: Is there any solution?

Whatever the cause, I have an easy and quick way to help speed up Windows and make your PC work better. A PC cleaner is good way to make it happen without upgrading your hardware. After using so many PC cleaners of the mainstream, I found Wise Care 365 is a real comprehensive PC cleaning and speed up tool which is twice or even more times faster than others. It is perfectly compatible with Windows 8.1, which has been tested a dozen of times. Maybe you can give it a shot.

The bottom line: If you're a dedicated Windows 8 hater, the update to Windows 8.1 isn't going to change your mind. For everyone else, this collection of tweaks, fixes, and new features is useful, but everything here should have shipped in the original version last year.

Edited by Dani: Removed from other sources

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Last Post by frank33
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i used various windows before. and this one is different from them, its fast and adds many useful functions like tweaks and fixes. it make my PC work better and faster. i like this windows.

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The other Windows 8 issue to be careful of is 32-bit vs. 64-bit.
I was delighted last week to download 8 Pro from a CD and
then upgrade online to 8.1. Problem now is that the version in question
only has 32-bits even though my desktop is 64-bit. Certainly if I’d been
asked a question as to which I wanted I’d have said 64.
And it seems correcting this is not trivial.

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I upgraded from 8.0 to 8.1 yesterday. Everything went without a hitch, until I tried to access the internet. My computer is wifi and the upgrade lot all network connection settings as well as it deleted antivirus program. I had to reinstall Linksys wifi driver and reconnect to the wifi router. I tried to connect to my homegroup network, but it failed most likely because of some obscure security setting on the computer.

I didn't have the problem that frank33 reported. Are you sure you installed the 64-bit version from the CD? On my computer, control panel --> System program says it's still 64-bit os after the upgrade.

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Are you sure you installed the 64-bit version from the CD?

I am sure I installed the 32 bit version.
The problem is that NOBODY checked beforehand whether the CD was 32 or 64 bit.

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The Windows 8.0 CD package I have has both disks in it (full version, not upgrade). If you want 64-bit then I think you will have to completly reinstall the os. You can't upgrade from 32 to 64 bit without total reinstallation.

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you will have to completly reinstall the os

Yes. That is why I posted : to warn everybody else.

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frank, it was up to you to download the correct dvd , you should have picked 64bit .
where did you download it from

Edited by caperjack

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I was just handed the CD. Obviously SOMEBODY shold have checked earlier.

Note, I am NOT trying to correct this problem here, just warning people
what to be careful about.

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You might as SOMEBODY why he/she gave you the 32-bit version instead of the 64-bit version. Maybe it was company policy -- or SOMEBODY bought multiple licenses for only 32-bit version. Could be a lot of reasons for doing that.

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Note, I am NOT trying to correct this problem here, just warning people what to be careful about.

I fail to see how this warning has anything to do with Windows 8 (or 8.1). As the end user it's your job to specify what you want and verify that you received what you want.

If this is your personal PC, the onus is completely on you. If this is a company PC, as AD mentioned there may be a number of perfectly legitimate reasons why you were given a 32 bit version.

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OK, this may well be a stopid error that I at least contributed to.
But are you saying that it is SO stupid that NOBODY ELSE on this site could possibly make it ever again ? Actually I do hope you are right about that.

Just one simple question to anybody who happns to have a Windows 8 CD
lying around :
how prominent is any writing on the disk and/or its packaging
saying ‘32-bit’ or ’64-bit’ ? Thanks.

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But are you saying that it is SO stupid that NOBODY ELSE on this site could possibly make it ever again ? Actually I do hope you are right about that.

That's not what I'm saying. I wish it were true, but I'm not that naive. What I'm saying is that this really has nothing to do with Windows 8 specifically. You could just as easily "warn" people to be careful that when buying an automobile it could run on diesel or gasoline (or electricity, or hybrid, etc...). And you'd just as quickly get sneers that it's common knowledge and you should do research before making a purchase.

Is it okay to mention 32 bit or 64 bit on a list of things to consider when getting a new OS? Absolutely. But I don't think it constitutes a "warning".

how prominent is any writing on the disk and/or its packaging
saying ‘32-bit’ or ’64-bit’ ?

I don't have my packaging handy at the moment, but IIRC it was present and not easily missed.

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As you can see, you'd have to be blind not to have known which version you were installing. Even the disk itself is labeled clearly with either 32 or 64. And people who don't know what those numbers mean have absolutely no business installing the os by themselves.

ac5e54952504db9f543745b48dbf4fad >how prominent is any writing on the disk and/or its packaging

Edited by Ancient Dragon

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Well, obviously if I’d seen ‘32’ THAT big then I’d not have done the installation. ( Actually cannot remember seeing the sleeve at all now. )

As for the difference between the versions, the main one for me is Hyper-V.
Now it’s only a few months ago I was given a formal lesson in how to load
Windows Server 2003 onto Windows 7. It was pleasantly shocking to find
that a version of Windows Server ( which is what Hyper-V is )
comes pre-loaded with Windows 8. But ONLY the 64-bit version.

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soor if i may have offended you frank ,didnt meant too,i have made many stupid mistakes since i bought my first 386 win 3.11 computer

Edited by caperjack

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