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Ok, so I use Windows Live Mail Beta, don't know why, but they "invited" me ages ago, and it looks quite attractive, so I keep it. Sometimes, I get these yellow errors: "Windows Live Mail was unable to complete this request", today though, they're not going away. Also I get javascript/object errors on the page, my javascript works fine, my computer is well configured to access all content. So, I go to the live support, seems pretty cool in theory; but I'm greeted with more javascript errors, and the "support technician" gives me a link to "fix my computer so Windows Live Mail will work". Somehow that seems backwards.

Instructions consist of: clearing cache, I don't mind that; clearing cookies, I ABSOLUTELY DO MIND THAT, now I have to login everywhere again; registering a dll, dno whether it was or wasn't registered before, but I'm guessing it was; setting some trusted/privacy options; and allowing the applications over my firewall, but I have my firewall off for an hour anyway.

WINDOWS LIVE MAIL STILL DOESN'T WORK!

The root cause error that I believe to be causing the problem is a script error on the page: 'Web.UI.Editor.Strings' is not an object. You'd think a company like Microsoft would be well experienced in providing reliable, well tested code.

I think Microsoft most certainly need to buck their ideas up w/ re. to compatibility and support in the future, no-one will care about "new Windows" if a competitor offers something superior, especially if it's a straight choice of "upgrade to new windows product, or upgrade to new company-x product which does the same but works better" Relying on monopoly won't work forever, hopefully. I stopped working in Microsoft languages because I predict their downfall.

Still, I like Windows, that's the problem; it's a good system, let down by what can only be described as outright brashness by developers. I liked Windows 98. I liked error messages that told me what was wrong, and not asked me to send an anonymous message, which, by definition will never be replied to. I liked being in control of the security of my Internet Explorer - the last virus I got on Windows XP was from a hole in MICROSOF'TS WMV format. I liked the old hotmail, it was reliable, simple, and free from errors 99.99% of the time. I liked old versions of Microsoft Office/MSN Messenger, they were quick-to-load even on a slow computer. I liked Microsoft Paint.. wait, I still like Microsoft Paint, but even that: in old versions of paint, you'd copy and paste a big picture into a small container, and you'd be asked whether or not you wanted to resize the container. NOT ANYMORE, that's been deprecated in favour of what appears to be context with an element of random.

And what's with getting an application/code "signed by microsoft" it's like getting an enhanced disclosure signed by a convicted criminal.

So yeah, if you're listening Microsoft, sort it out, or I'll buy a Mac/Linux OS.

Matt

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Last Post by MattEvans
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heey, its me Nse.. am also a software engineer.
if you have a clear and specific requirements and u also have a high budget and the Milestones of each activity at a time is clear so use the waterfall.
you can use the Throw-away prototyping if the requirements was poorly understood i mean that the throw-away helps u to understand the whole system, to validate and derive the system requirements then you throw it coz it doesn't considered as a final system.
the evolutionary prototyping must be used for systems where the specifications can not be developed in advance and based on systems that allow rapid system iteration .

hope these information will be useful 4 u.

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Wow. I remember thinking that rant, but I'm quite suprised that I actually posted it..

I suppose, in light of the dredging-up of this topic; I should give an update. I don't use LiveMail anymore, nor do I use only Windows for that matter, I generally use Linux more than Windows, but am occasionally forced to use Windows-only applications for extended periods.

I have my complaints about Linux, but they're mostly superficial, and much harder to direct at a specific body, In terms of my own preference, I prefer whichever OS I'm using at a given time, and miss the other one.

Thanks nse, for that somewhat random information paraphrased from a systems analysis textbook. I would imagine, that it would be more use to Microsoft than it would to me; I always stick with the flexible 'start in the middle and (optionally) finish at the end' methodology.

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