Ukash voucher codes targeted in loans scam

happygeek

Global online cash provider Ukash, founded in 2001 and with a presence in more than 50 countries across 6 continents, has warned users not to get scammed by a loan company con doing the rounds at the moment. Ukash works on a code basis, with the user buying a voucher in a shop or petrol station for example, and the unique 19 digit code it contains is used to pay for stuff anywhere online that accepts Ukash transactions (the codes can also load 'cash' into prepaid cards and e-wallets).

8dacd82b5aee0265e8e9055ff922f33a Reports are emerging that conmen claiming to represent 'The Start-ups Loan Company' amongst other loan providers, are scamming people out of their Ukash codes. “The official Start-Up Loans Company is a government backed organisation and is not associated with providing loans to individuals, but is one of the names criminals are using to conduct this scam,” warns Miranda McLean, a director of Ukash. “The criminals have access to personal information provided to loan broker websites and claim to have approved a loan, but need a fee to be paid in advance."

The advice is, obviously, that Ukash voucher codes should never be given to a third-party by any method other than through an official Ukash partner site. “No genuine loan company will ask for a fee to be paid in advance" McLean advises, continuing "the simple message is to treat Ukash with the same security as you would physical cash. We continue to work closely with police and other fraud fighting organisations, and update our website with the latest scams, to help stop these criminals in their tracks and protect our customers.”

Anyone who realises they have been scammed should contact Ukash immediately on 00800 247 85274, and the company will attempt to block the Ukash code before it is used. They should also report the crime, or attempted crime, to Action Fraud UK on 0300 123 2040.

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A freelance technology journalist for 30 years, I have been a Contributing Editor at PC Pro (one of the best selling computer magazines in the UK) for most of them. As well as currently contributing to Forbes.com, The Times and Sunday Times via Raconteur Special Reports, SC Magazine UK, Digital Health, IT Pro and Infosecurity Magazine, I am also something of a prolific author. My last book, Being Virtual: Who You Really are Online, which was published in 2008 as part of the Science Museum TechKnow Series by John Wiley & Sons. I am also the only three times winner (2006, 2008, 2010) of the BT Information Security Journalist of the Year title, and was humbled to be presented with the ‘Enigma Award’ for a ‘lifetime contribution to information security journalism’ in 2011 despite my life being far from over...

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LastMitch

The advice is, obviously, that Ukash voucher codes should never be given to a third-party by any method other than through an official Ukash partner site. “No genuine loan company will ask for a fee to be paid in advance" McLean advises, continuing "the simple message is to treat Ukash with the same security as you would physical cash. We continue to work closely with police and other fraud fighting organisations, and update our website with the latest scams, to help stop these criminals in their tracks and protect our customers.”

I never heard of Ukash payment plan til now.

I think it happend to PayPal but not sure what year it happend regarding the similarity how scammers used voucher to get money from customers.

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