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Last Post by tgreer
0

Your question, as asked, is impossible to answer. You've left us too much to guess. What kind of script? What kind of content? Is this a CSS question relating to placement of HTML elements? Margins? Padding? Centering? Or are you asking for suggestions as to what kind of generic content you could place on your site? What does "make up it" mean?

0

You still haven't given us enough information to give you a meaningful answer.

You can add content to your web pages by writing HTML. You can position that content, to the left, or the right, with CSS.

What content do you want to add? How? Where? When? I just don't understand what you're asking.

0

I'm just a begainner:)Is it possible also add contennent supplied by script to make up the blank?

0

Ok, I think I'm understanding now.

The way to create a page with two separate "content sections" is to arrange the content into separate block-level elements.

You can do this with a TABLE, or with DIV elements.

A DIV looks like:

<div id="leftSide">
Place whatever HTML you want here, 
including scripts that generate content.
</div>

<div id="rightSide">
Place whatever HTML you want here, 
including scripts that generate content.
</div>

Normally, the second DIV would display below the first DIV. You can change this behavior with CSS. The CSS attribute you'd use would be "float".

Here is a complete, though very simplistic, example:

<html>
<head>
<style type="text/css">
.left
{
  float:left;
  width:250px;
}
.right
{
  float:right;
  width:250px;
}
</style>
</head>

<body>


<div id="leftSide" class="left">
Place whatever HTML you want here, 
including scripts that generate content.
</div>

<div id="rightSide" class="right">
Place whatever HTML you want here, 
including scripts that generate content.
</div>

</body>
</html>

You should tinker with this, look up the CSS "float" attributes, understand what they do, as well as the other CSS properties (such as "width"). Learn the difference between CSS "class" definitions and "id" definitions.

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