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I have a small form factor Dell Optiplex GX260, 2.53 GHZ, 1 gig RAM. I recently installed a Nvidia Geforce FX 5200 card in the only available PCI slot. That slot happens to be really close to the power box. After 10 minutes or so of playing a very low requirement game, the fan turns on and the game play is slowed down a bit. Is the card being too close to the power box a bad thing? Will it increase the chance of overheating? Would it be possible to maybe transfer the motherboard from my small form factor case to a bigger case to give it better ventalation? My motherboard is an Intel P4 82845G.

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Last Post by nizzy1115
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It is possible that it is heating up too much, and it is possible to move it to another case (but you may have a slight chance of the mounting holes not lining up). You can move your pci cards around. I suggest you first try and reposition the card in another slot and move a different card closer to the power supply. See if this helps.

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It's a small form factor PC ( Only has one PCI slot on the mother board ) meaning that i have no where else to move the card to. I do have an available AGP slot that is further away from the power supply, but graphic cards that i've looked at will not fit because of the size of my PC !!! is there maybe a fan i can install to cool down the situation or is my PC just not cut for gaming ??? i appreciate the time/help who ever you are =)

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They do make some small form factor agp cards, although not many. You could add a pci blower fan, but you would need an available pci slot on the back of your computer.

Small form factor computers are not really meant for gaming, but more for buisness applications. So they do not really require the extra cooling because they are never really stressed that much.

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