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I recently moved from US to Hong Kong. I thought that I read my computer correctly in that it would work in US or here. I purchase an adapter and like a dummie plug directly into the socket.

I heard a sizzle then a pop and then say a little bit of smoke. Needlessly to say computer no longer works. Is it worth while to fix the PC? Also, I read in forum that you make the hard drive a "slave" to transfer files. Is this difficult?

I would really like to keep PC- I only have had a couple of years.

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Last Post by JANINE1
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Is this a desk top or a lap top computer.

If it is a desk top there is a switch on the PSU to go from 230v to 110v, you want the PSU in the 110v position in the US. Switch it and see if it survived.

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It is a desktop. I will try when I go back home. I think this is why I fried is that I didnt switch it before plugging into wall.

How easy is it to replace power supply? How much does it cost?

Also, how hard is it copy the data from one hard drive to another if I end up getting another computer.

Thanks so much...I dont know jack about computers.

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Replacing the PSU is very simple, unplug it from the wall receptacle, open the case and remove the four screws that hold the PSU. You should be able to pull it out to the side and install the new one in its place. Just start unplugging the connections and replace them with that same type connectors from the new PSU. Make sure that the voltage is set properly, plug it in and fire it up.

Please tell us what make and model your computer is, some computers manufacturers are proprietorial and use none ATX PSUs, the PSU can be of different dimensions, and the pin configuration on the motherboard connector can be different from that of a ATX connector.

As for transferring files from one hdd to another, first off, there is a possibility of damaging your hdd with static electricity, you can avoid this by discharging yourself by touching the metal of the case, be sure that the computer is turned off. There are a couple of ways to go about this, I prefer to copy the files onto a CD or DVD, this will not only provide you with a means of transferring the files, but will leave you with back up files in case you ever need the again. Another way would be to install the old hdd into the new machine as a slave and transfer the files from the slave to the master, here is an article explaining how to do this. You will need to change the jumper on the rear of the slave hdd to the slave position, there should be a diagram on the hdd showing that location. The cable that the hdd in the new machine should have a extra connector in the middle, us that to connect the old hdd, and there will be an extra molex connector from the PSU (the four pin connector), plug this into the slave drive.

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Unfortunately, European and Asian wall outlets utilize 220 volt output, opposed to the American 110.

If you're--if you plan on using this computer again--buying a power supply, I can't tell you how unpredictable some models can be. I've had trouble with the things that come in the cases I buy. However, the incredible reliability of Antec brand PSU's prove very powerful, very stable, and depending on the wattage and stress on a quiet PSU system, potentially expensive.

dcc placed the process of replacing the power supply and hooking up your old hard drive to another machine in words very well. It's really as simple as it seems, just a matter of checking the jumper configuration firsthand: In the case of my Seagate drive, the possible configurations are displayed on the drive's top. If not, typically, master drives (used to boot the system) should have a configuration like this... [vertically placed jumper], [pin column], [pin column], [pin column], or []::: in visual terms. Slave drives, which is going to yours, would have no jumper on it... ::::

Sorry about any repeated information from the prior post, just trying to provide as much info as I can. : )

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Unfortunately, European and Asian wall outlets utilize 220 volt output, opposed to the American 110.

If you're--if you plan on using this computer again--buying a power supply, I can't tell you how unpredictable some models can be. I've had trouble with the things that come in the cases I buy. However, the incredible reliability of Antec brand PSU's prove very powerful, very stable, and depending on the wattage and stress on a quiet PSU system, potentially expensive.

dcc placed the process of replacing the power supply and hooking up your old hard drive to another machine in words very well. It's really as simple as it seems, just a matter of checking the jumper configuration firsthand: In the case of my Seagate drive, the possible configurations are displayed on the drive's top. If not, typically, master drives (used to boot the system) should have a configuration like this... [vertically placed jumper], [pin column], [pin column], [pin column], or []::: in visual terms. Slave drives, which is going to yours, would have no jumper on it... ::::

Sorry about any repeated information from the prior post, just trying to provide as much info as I can. : )

First off, the line voltages outside of the U.S. is typically 230V to 240V AC not 220V, 220V is the potential between line 1 and line 2 in a single phase installations in the U.S..

There shouldn't be confusion, much less problems replacing the PSU as long as he purchases one of the better known manufactured brands, like Thermaltake or Antec. Truth be known you would be better off purchasing you PSU by its weight, heavier PSUs usually use better transfomers and larger capacitors . The only question is how large of a PSU to purchase, in his case all he needs to do is match the wattage of the uinit he is replacing.

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All information is quite appreciated. My pc is an emaching...I am at work right now so I dont have the model number.

I assume that I can go to any computer and get a power supply.

Another dumb question...let's say that I change power supply and it still doesnt turn on. Can I make the drive a slave without having power to the unit.

I have already purchased another unit so right now I would just like to get the files.

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. Can I make the drive a slave without having power to the unit.

Yes, it's setting one jumber on the back of the drive.

For your PSU: Big change you just blew your fuse.. That's what it's there for. Repare costs 5 bucks I guess. Don't try it yourself, the capacitors might still be charged and if you're unlucky they will hurt you very bad.

Edited by Nick Evan: n/a

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tdale wrote...Another dumb question...let's say that I change power supply and it still doesnt turn on. Can I make the drive a slave without having power to the unit.

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#1Yes, it's setting one jumber on the back of the drive.


#2)For your PSU: Big change you just blew your fuse.. That's what it's there for. Repare costs 5 bucks I guess. Don't try it yourself, the capacitors might still be charged and if you're unlucky they will hurt you very bad.

#1)What are you planning on using this hdd in if it's to be used as a slave drive? In any application you will need to have it powered via the four pin molex connector. What Nick was referring to is the jumper on the rear of the hdd which changes the configuration from channel select to master or slave depending on the location of the jumper. There is a diagram usually found on the top of the hdd which shows the jumper configurations.

#2)There is a slim chance that could have happened, but not likely as the PSU was set to be used on 230V, so it didn't see a overwhelming amount of voltage. The capacitors on most all PSUs are pc mounted with the potential being underneath the board making it a little bit hard to discharge them directly, but it still can be done. The charge on these capacitors will last for many weeks, don't believe it if someone tells you that it will dissipate in a couple of days.

If you do have the soldering skills and know how to use a volt ohm meter you could check to see if the fuse is blown and make the repair if it is. These fuses are pc mounted as well and may require detaching the board from its mounting so that it can be turned over, once you have access to the underside of the board take the meter set on volts first to see if there is any voltage, then to ohms to see if there is continuity through the fuse. If it read no ohms, it's blown. To remove the fuse you will need a desoldering tool to assist in the extraction of the fuse leads and to make sure that the holes where the leads were removed from a clean so that another can be installed.

One last issue that should be mentioned here is electrostatic discharge, this time of year especially this is a problem, you walk across the carpet shuffling you feet and when you go to touch something a blue spark arks across between you finger on the object. That spark is the ESD, and ESDs can kill chips on your motherboard, this includes your RAM. The solution is simple, with the computer turned off and still plugged into the AC receptacle open the case, before you touch any of the components just touch the metal of the case, this will discharge any static electricity. If you do this every time that you go to touch anything inside it should leave your components safe.

I apologize for the long winded response.:rolleyes:

Edited by Nick Evan: n/a

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I have little skills and this sounds a bit too complicated. I will try and find a computer store to check the fuse.

If damage is severe, I will talk to them about how to get the data off my disk.

If I am understanding the last post, chances that it is just the fuse is probably pretty slim.

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If I am understanding the last post, chances that it is just the fuse is probably pretty slim.

You understand correct, but I disagree.
How did you're computer smell when it started smoking and how long did the smell stay? This may sound like an odd question, but if the fuse blew, the smell isn't that bad and will disappear very quickly. But if the capacitors blew....well...it's a lot worse

regards Niek

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This sounds like the Power supply may well have been set to the wrong voltage as the others have said. If there's an over voltage it will cause fuses to blow.

Where did the smell and the smoke come from?? Did it actually come from the Power supply itself or did it appear to come from the motherboard?? this could benefit us greatly here.

Regarding getting the data off your old drive, I notice nobody has suggested buying an external 3.5 inch drive caddy and installing your hard drive into that. Far far easier then fiddling about with jumpers on the back of drives and you get a far better data transfer rate if you transfer data by USB rather then rely on CD or DVD to do it.

The external drive will be detected as 'removable data drive' or something similar. its easy then

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