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Hi everyone
Basically I want to set-up a linux machine at home so I can do my programming here. Any recommended distros that are fairly easy to run and come with a good compiler for c++? Thanks.

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Last Post by Paul.Esson
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I'd say Suse 9.1 Pro is about the easiest to install and run and has the latest of all libs for compiling. but the pro version isnt free to download.
BUT. dont get the personal edition of 9.1 as it has nothing. it can only compile RPMs made for it as they are setup to use the 'hidden' compiler (cpp(for c plus plus)).
Other than that, try the other recent distro's from Mandrake, Debian and the newer Fedora project (new distro since they stopped supporting redhat nine after compaq gave up on it).
Have a look at linuxiso.org
They have all the latest distro's and even some Unix based ones (FreeBSD, NetBSD etc.)
Its a great website and well worth a visit if you'd like to give a few distro's a whirl before settling on a comfortable one that has everything you need.

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Hello,

I was a longtime supporter of RedHat... am still running 7.3 in places, and 9.0 in other places. I have not worked long with Fedora to comment, but what RedHat did disturbs me, and I am looking at other options.

So far SUSE has loaded fine on my box; I am also wanting to test FreeBSD. Am told that FreeBSD is a lot of compiling on the machine... not sure if I want to take my marbles and do that. SUSE has worked well though.

I do suggest you install *everything* from your distro, so that you have the various compilers, header files, and so forth. If you are going to do dev work, you don't want to have a limited environment (software, memory, hard drive). Don't cause a problem by selectively installing the meat and potatoes of the OS. (then again, if you don't need a news server, don't install it, but do install MySQL -- you might get an SQL project, and need it later!).

Christian

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Hello,


I do suggest you install *everything* from your distro, so that you have the various compilers, header files, and so forth. If you are going to do dev work, you don't want to have a limited environment (software, memory, hard drive). Don't cause a problem by selectively installing the meat and potatoes of the OS. (then again, if you don't need a news server, don't install it, but do install MySQL -- you might get an SQL project, and need it later!).

Christian

That's the evil Microsoft Windows approach. Bad, bad, bad.

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Theres nothing wrong with windows you mook :p


Anyway I would suggest Gentoo if you want to really get your hands dirty with linux and you can read well.

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Hello,

Why is it bad to install everything, and then disable what you don't need, and firewall it to be sure? If you have the space to do it, why not install it and then keep them all upgraded as time goes on?

If you don't, there is a risk of needing to install it later, and running into dependancy problems. I'll admit that I have been RedHat-ized, in that I have fought various dependancy hell wars, and won them after lots of grief. So other distros may have a better upgrade procedure; that is for me to discover and find out. RedHat does not.

Now, I would strongly agree that Microsoft has a broken installation methodology. Installs it all, and enables it all (although Win 2003 Server does come with things installed, but disabled, or not installed.... it is a step in the right direction). The Problem with M$ though is the multiple places to define a group policy, and the order that those policies are defined... one says yes, another says no, another says yes, and the forth says yes, but the one that says no "wins" due to some OS design found in Chapter 17 of "the Hidden Microsoft Mess". Linux does not have that armada of policy decisions... so you have a much better management of the daemons (services for you Windoze folks) and can control them.

As for me, I am going to go and study SUSE now. Granted, Fedora is out there, but I think I need to break from that distro. I am still angered by what RedHat decided to do, and well, don't want to do that again.

Christian

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Hi everyone
Basically I want to set-up a linux machine at home so I can do my programming here. Any recommended distros that are fairly easy to run and come with a good compiler for c++? Thanks.

Ok, well you want an easy distro, lol. Theres a few i can name off the top of my head.. RH (red hat) or SuSe 9.1 Pro, lol. (you can get .ISO files off suprnova, or you can download them off the net at soem location (google my freind) but back to the point) Have you ever used linux?, I only use live distro's because well with such a small HD (hard drive), i really dont have the option to partiton. And no im not some loser with 1000's of mp3's. I just use my space wisely. If you have experience and know what aterm or a terminal is, then go for Slack, or SLAX the live version. But if all you doing is programming. Then stop right there. Please dont waste your time jsut for a C++ compiler you can get plenty for windows. Stop by bloodshed.net, and get Dev C++, or my good friends at borland they could hook you up. Even microsoft got a free compiler. My opinion is stick to live distro's and save programs to floopy's (walmart 50 pack for like 6 bucks) Much easier to use, and learn with. I also run a Wireless NIC, so pretty much networking withj nix is well not so easy with me, so im all set. (not lazy). Well i hope i helped you, if not post more, also a good place to look for things you might be interested in well would be http://www.freeprogrammingresources.com PcE, Sphyenx

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Debian, absolutely. It was great back before my Debian drive died a tragiic death... :cry: It wasn't Debian's fault though, that drive always made noise and I was expecting it to die soon. Since it took 34 floppies to install, I just switched to Be.

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Mike...this is a bit off topic...but since you're a fellow debian lover..

Have you tried MEPIS? I really dig it and they are currently working on ProMEPIS which is geared more toward programmers and advanced users. If you haven't given it a go...check it out. I really dig the fact that I can use anything on MEPIS and Debian because they use the same repositories...I broke an Ubuntu box trying to install something from the testing branch but have been running MEPIS for almost 2 years now without a single breakage...I've installed stuff from all three branches without a glitch...or minimal ones at best. Anyways, I thought it might be an option for you to consider as well as the original author of this thread.

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:p Hi there, jasweb2002 - I would say that Mandrake 10 is about the simplest I have ever worked with and I find it to be quite user-friendly :cool: . Not to mantion that the GUI is a bit impresive... :mrgreen:

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SuSE is nice, but beware of Novell Linux Desktop you might see links for both on their website.

I have tried Novell's Linux Desktop for the last month, lots of problems with installation (no, I am not a newbie) Once it was running it was beutiful to look at but not specatular in any way other than being a well designed corportate desktop image.

I am going to give Fedora 3 a shot for my primary OS due to official VMware support, if it is too bloated I will go full circle back to slackware (and change my avatar again!)

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I have to vote for Mepis...

And I would suggest you spend the $15 at distrowatch and have them send you a stack of LIVE versions for you to test drive before you install to your hard drive..

My second choice so far... Knoppix

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TI,


I've found PCLinuxOS to be another gem...really nice eyecandy and very stable...I show it off to my friends when trying to convert them to Linux :p

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I use SuSE 9.1 Pro and it does everything I need it to. Though I'm not a hardcore programmer by any means and can very easily be called a n00b programmer (can't deny what I am), it still is a very user-friendly distro. With the newer version of SuSE you really don't have to worry about package dependencies becuz when installing a new package through YaST it will notify you of dependecies and such.

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If you want to learn something about linux and do coding i would suggest crux www.crux.nu That is what i use. But i will warn you it is not for newbs. Once it is installed however it is a very nice distrobution.

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I recently installed Mepis and I want to change my vote! This distro really rocks! I have run linux for years, for example in 2002 I used a linux laptop as my main work machine for the entire year.

I had no idea that linux had become so USER FRIENDLY and so MAINTAINABLE! I love this linux!

su
apt-get remove pain
apt-get remove frustration
apt-get remove confusion
apt-get remove worry
apt-get install nirvana
:p

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I keep telling everyone...MEPIS MEPIS MEPIS. But does anyone listen? Evidently they do :P

For those of you who haven't tried it yet, you best be getting with it. The latest version is just brilliant. Look for SimplyMEPIS 3.3

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TI,


I've found PCLinuxOS to be another gem...really nice eyecandy and very stable...I show it off to my friends when trying to convert them to Linux :p

Got three timeouts when I tried your hyperlink

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It is hard to get Mepis since all the sites seem to busy.

But... It really rocks...

Take the time to find it and download it...

3.3 will make you a believer...

The support on freenode is the best of any distro...

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Hey...No slackers around?? :D :D

If it is Linux, I am a Slacker all the way! It is the only OS that does what I tell it to and nothing else! I have already converted three Linux Users to it. We all agree "once you go slack you never go back"

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Granted, this program does cost a considerable amount of money depending on what you want...however, there are ways of getting it otherwise. (not that I would).

I used to use slackware for about a year I think.. The package management systems worse then RPM !!

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Having said that Its a great distro for leaning about linux gentoo seems to be a tad bit complicated for some biginners (the install isn't really a nice introduction to linux) slackwares install is exceedingly simple yet allows you a little freedom, Distros like fedora core, suse etc. are very gui orientated, witch is ok if you just wish to use the operating system or are already familure with linux, but in all honesty arnt the best distros for learning about linux.

also they seem to be overly bloated, slackwhere fits on a cd suse fits on a dvd :).

I must say I wouldn't want to use slackware for a primary box since its a damn annoyance installing new packages, Unlike gentoo/debian witch is easy as pie :P

Gentoo and Ubuntu have a very good support network, I bleave its alot better then slackwares.

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