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I want to install openSUSE Linux on my computer really badly. So I managed to install openSUSE (64-bit version, as my processor) on DVD. I booted it up, but because I also have Microsoft Windows 7 on this disk, I wanted to make it really carefully. I wanted 1st partition for Windows, 2nd partition for Linux and 3rd partition of syncing on Titanic. So I booted it up and I came towards "Disk partitioning" section and it listed 3 partitions, 1st was 20GB, 2nd was couple megabytes and 3rd was probably rest (about 460GB) and I have no idea which is which. Because in reality 1st partition is 75GB with Windows on it., 2nd and 3rd both each were 195GB and totally empty. I don't want to delete my Windows. How do I know which partition is which in openSUSE? Can't I just see 3 normal partitions with pointed which is Windows and choose another one of the 2 for SUSE?

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Last Post by Gribouillis
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Windows usually uses the entire disc, so even if you think your Windows system uses only 75GB of the disc, that is likely only the amount currently in use. Also, current Windows systems use the EFI boot format, and depending upon your SUSE version, it may be looking at the boot partition as a pre-EFI standard boot partition.

Myself, I would suggest using a virtual machine manager such as VirtualBox on your Windows host, and installing OpenSUSE in a virtual machine with that, eliminating this problem altogether. The only issues you would have with that is if you need to develop hardware drivers for SUSE, in which case I would recommend that you install OpenSUSE on an external drive and boot that when necessary. Dual boot systems, especially these days, is often much more trouble than they are worth.

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Windows usually uses the entire disc, so even if you think your Windows system uses only 75GB of the disc,

There are three different partitions, Windows is installed on one.||

Dual boot systems, especially these days, is often much more trouble than they are worth.

I need Linux for normal usage and Windows, if Linux's Wine won't be able to work. Putting one or another into VMware would be highly problematic, plus, it would be gigantic bottleneck to what I could achieve by just booting it.

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Run linux on bootable flash drive and use GParted to see your actual partitions. You can use GParted to create a partition for Linux only or anything you want, a separated one

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You realize that SUSE hasn't really modified this partitions yet? It suggests to put them that way.

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What I am saying is that you can perform the pertition before installing your openSuse. As to begin with, you mentioned you have no idea what pertitions you really have as you think that your windows os is on a pertition 75GB however, you don't get that 1 listed. Using GParted you'll see all existing partitions and you won't be in doubt what/where exists or not. As from there if you have a partition as mentioned earlier 400-somethin GB, you can separate it and then install SUSE on already existing partition instead of making 1 while installing it

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you have no idea what pertitions you really have

What? I know exactly which "partitions" there are | 100MB NTFS System | 75.04GB NFTS Windows | 195.31GB NTFS empty | 195.31GB NTFS empty.

Using GParted you'll see all existing partitions

"Format partitions" tool in Windows works as good as well.

windows os is on a pertition 75GB however, you don't get that 1 listed.

I do get it listed on Windows, not on openSUSE. I get NONE of all partitions listed in SUSE. SUSE manages it as if all partitions were empty (it doesn't say that or anything).

you can separate it and then install SUSE on already existing partition instead of making 1 while installing it

That's the problem. How do I do that? I want it to use only 1 partition, not automatically predefine that. How do I install SUSE on a one partition before installation makes one up? Even if I do that, installation would still want to go through that step, and still mess with these partititons.

Edited by RikTelner

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During the step where it asks you to create a partition, you can just select (an empty) already existing one instead

EDIT: Uh, not sure why SUSE won't list them, is that the actual problem you are facing?

Edited by Slavi

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you can just select (an empty) already existing one instead

I can't! I wanted to do exactly that. But instead, before I can't do anything, it setups every partitions and asks me if I want to have it that way. Assuming that if SUSE manages these partitions in that manner, Windows will be ruined.

is that the actual problem you are facing?

Yes. It manages partitions on it's own, I don't know which.

Edited by RikTelner

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hello,

as you know your partitions you listed file type NTFS, I don't believe that you can install SUSE on NTFS, delete these partitions.

install SUSE using the unallocated space left on the disk, either let SUSE automatically set itself up in the unallocated or create it the partitions manually.

As I recall when I installed SUSE I needed 3 partitions for it; a swap partition, one for the install and one for the home directory (this may have changed since i installed it).

If you are creating the partitions manually you'll need to create the home directory and swap partition within an extended partition. You can only have 4 primary partitions you would need to create a partition for the install of SUSE and extended partition to contain the swap and home partition.

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install SUSE using the unallocated space left on the disk, either let SUSE automatically set itself up in the unallocated or create it the partitions manually.

facepalm Have you read my post? I don't want SUSE to automatically set up itself and if I set partitions manually up, they don't identify themselves! So I don't know which is which.

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I agree with Slavi that gparted is probably the tool you need. What you can do is burn a boot-repair-disk. Apart from repairing boots, it contains a few tools, among which gparted. I used it today to resize and move a 300 GB partition (it took a few hours, but it worked). My experience with gparted is that it is better than other partition managers.

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@Xlphos, Pretty sure that linux(in general) doesnt have troubles with NFTS although, it is meant to perform slower in some cases compared to Ext4 for example. Actually, If I were you I'd give it a go and format one of the existing empty partitions to EXT4 and see if SUSE can see it for installation. Something else quick that you can do is get ubuntu(or w/e else) on bootable flash and try to install it, check whether it is able to detect your partitions without asking to make 1(or multiple) automatically

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Something else quick that you can do is get ubuntu(or w/e else) on bootable flash and try to install it

Tried. I formatted one parititon, changed it to highest Ext* (where * is the highest number I could find) and it prompted an error about... I don't actually remember what's that about, but I remember it said something about "root directory not being set directly" (note: this isn't actual message, that's what I think it meant, not what it said).

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I'm on Linux Ubuntu now. Everything is smooth like [put here the smoothest thing you can imagine]. I'm installing apps, moving data and actually using app. And Ubuntu doesn't give a tiniest bit. Is it even possible to crash Ubuntu?

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Is it even possible to crash Ubuntu?

Ubuntu is very good but not perfect. In fact if something goes wrong, it is generally easy to repair.

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