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i'm new to linux red hat 8 cant get it to find my modem .....the manual is a waste of space ....can anyone help plz ..... pulling me hair out ....
tried 3 different ones and it wont find any of them .............plz plz help. :o

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Last Post by big_k105
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i'm using intel 536ep v.92 modem...it is supose to recognise it .....but no joy

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Hello,

If that is a WinModem, you may have some troubles there.

You can try:

* Upgrading to Redhat 9. This requires backing up, and taking percautions, and planning

* Running Kudzu manually and seeing if it detects it.

* Go into /var/log/messages and see if there are any mentions of the modem. Perhaps there is an IRQ conflict or something else preventing the proper initialization of the modem. Logs can tell you a lot!

* Go into /proc and look at the pci and isapnp files. See if your modem is mentioned.

* Look into dmesg and see if your modem is mentioned.

Good luck, and let us know...

Christian

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Hello,

If that is a WinModem, you may have some troubles there.

You can try:

* Upgrading to Redhat 9. This requires backing up, and taking percautions, and planning

* Running Kudzu manually and seeing if it detects it.

* Go into /var/log/messages and see if there are any mentions of the modem. Perhaps there is an IRQ conflict or something else preventing the proper initialization of the modem. Logs can tell you a lot!

* Go into /proc and look at the pci and isapnp files. See if your modem is mentioned.

* Look into dmesg and see if your modem is mentioned.

Good luck, and let us know...

Christian

hi thinks i'm going to struggle .......very new to linux was hoping it was going to be easy ...thought wrong will try your ideas wish me luck and thanks for the info

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...was hoping it was going to be easy ...thought wrong

Unfortunately, hardware issues are one of the sticky ares for Linux. Because many hardware manufacturers assume that it's a "Windows world" out there, they do not provide Linux drivers and the like for their products. That leaves it up to open-source programmers (many working on a volunteer basis) to try to reverse engineer the stuff.

Winmodems, often called "softmodems", are particularly problematic in this area. Unlike full "hardware" modems, Winmodems rely on the operating system to do much of their work. This makes them cheaper to build, but guess what operating systems they're built to work with? Yup, you guessed it- MS operating systems.

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