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Hello,
i'm quite new to MacOS.
Have been working with Suse Linux until now.
Usually i divided the hard disk with three partitions:
1. Root: for OS and applications
2. Swap: swap file
3. Home (or User): for all saved documents.

Is it advisable to do a similar partitioning with MacOS X (Leopard)?
Or at least making two partitions, one for OS and applications and a second one for documents?

I am using a iMAc and a MacBookPro, both with a 320 Gb HD.

Thanks for any answer adn/or advice.

dangerly

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Last Post by macmad
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gets to many viruses in Unix

Instead of giving answers to questions not asked, how about being constructive?

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No answers or suggestions?
Somebody must know about this!

dan

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You can do that but make sure this is at the start of your installation.

A. Applications/ Disc-utility
b. Select any number of partitions for the volume you wish to partition. Then install original CD on one, then would be your startup Volume.

Hope that helps

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Thanks for your answer.
You think it is advisable to divide the hd in two partitions, one for OS the other for docs?

dan

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I think its bettr you juss partition HDD as advisable by the installer... if it asks you to do custom you can try.. my suggestion is to allocate swap memory as much as you got RAM...

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Yes you sure can!!
1 Partition as your system drive or startup Disc and the other as just storage.

Let me know how it goes!!

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The actual OS is Unix. OSX is an extension of unix and is in itself an application running in Unix. That said, I do not think it advisable to partition the drive as you said in your first request because it is not unix, It is a program running in unix. It is not meant to be treated as Unix and I do not see any advantage of the partition. Your are using the same drive so it does not speed up anything and the files that you are referring to are invisible to the general user and best left that way. Partition the drive as many ways you want and use it for your music, movies, or whatever, but leave the unix files on the boot partition!

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