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I've got a D-link DI-624+ router, which up until now has connected to my NTL's modem & both sitting on top of my base unit. I receive the wireless connection to my laptop through this router, for browsing Internet & fire sharing, etc. NTL's Internet is connected through Ethernet (DSL connection). My PC has NOT got the Wireless card but my laptop has.

I'm now thinking to cancel my NTL's connection & get myself signed-up on www.plus.net Internet. Alongside, what I also wish to do is to move my PC to different room.

If I get the ADSL based connection through www.plus.net, I reckon the connection would be through my BT line downstairs, which is the ONLY BT telephone socket I've at home. Hence to connect this ADSL based Internet, I'll have to establish connection from all the way downstairs’ BT telephone socket to upstairs’ PC.

In order NOT to have to connect downstairs’ BT socket with the router upstairs (so as NOT to have the hassle of “cabling”), alternatively, I could have my D-link router downstairs connected in my BT telephone socket & have a wireless card for my upstairs’ PC, so it can receive signal from the router downstairs. However, if I do so, I need to make sure that my D-link router has a “built-in” modem as well. How do I find that out ??? If it hasn’t got the built-in modem then I’ll have to rely on connecting this router with the modem provided by www.plus.net, which means, I’ll HAVE to keep this router connected to my modem using a “cable” & hence will have to keep it sitting on my base unit (meaning, I’ll have to connect “BT socket downstairs” with this router using a “cable” all the way from downstairs to upstairs, isn’t it).

Shall I have another BT socket installed upstairs, so as NOT to have a cable connecting from downstairs’ socket to upstairs’ router ???

I wonder if anyone around could possibly point me in the right direction & how exactly do I go about establishing the desired connection in an efficient way.

Additionally, I wonder that bearing in mind I wish to establish new connection in a new room now, should I say www.plus.net that I’ve ALREADY got the Internet connection or should I say, I need a brand new connection ??? After all, there’s a massive difference in the way, I’m currently connected (through DSL i.e. through cable drilled through my wall) & what I now want i.e. ADSL based connection (through my telephone line)

If there’s anything unclear with the situation or if anyone wish to ask me further to know something, before they could help me out, please do contact me using my e-mail.

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Last Post by jbennet
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The DI-624 is just a router not a DSL modem/router. So you'll need a DSL modem - and watch out for those awful USB-powered Voyager things the ISPs usually supply.

The most elegant solution is to have the router downstairs near the phone socket, thus minimising wires. But routers can be a pain in the backside when it comes to doing what they're supposed to do in real peoples houses, and the last thing you want is to find that next to the phone socket is a blackspot.

Test your router there first and see what signal strength you get. The weaker it is, the slower your connection will be.

The other 'best' option is to have BT put a socket in upstairs. You don't want to be messing about with extensions yourself if you can avoid it. They'll do it around the outside of the house most likely. Shorter and neater.

Your biggest problem is going to be getting your ADSL connection activated in the first place.

To be honest, I'm amazed you're moving away from NTL (unless you moved house and have no choice). NTL is cable and already their top speed offering is higher than DSL. The upper limit is also going to be much higher, so when NTL roll out 20MB in the near future, DSL won't be able to compete. And NTL is genuinely 'always on', but DSL is still a dial-in type service most times.

Even now, with some ISPs in the UK offering 14MB on DSL, it has been shown that you need to live within a few hundred metres of the exchange to stand a chance of getting that. Typically, most people on a 14MB service will get less than 10MB - the current NTL top speed package.

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The DI-624 is just a router not a DSL modem/router. So you'll need a DSL modem - and watch out for those awful USB-powered Voyager things the ISPs usually supply.

The most elegant solution is to have the router downstairs near the phone socket, thus minimising wires. But routers can be a pain in the backside when it comes to doing what they're supposed to do in real peoples houses, and the last thing you want is to find that next to the phone socket is a blackspot.

Test your router there first and see what signal strength you get. The weaker it is, the slower your connection will be.

The other 'best' option is to have BT put a socket in upstairs. You don't want to be messing about with extensions yourself if you can avoid it. They'll do it around the outside of the house most likely. Shorter and neater.

Your biggest problem is going to be getting your ADSL connection activated in the first place.

To be honest, I'm amazed you're moving away from NTL (unless you moved house and have no choice). NTL is cable and already their top speed offering is higher than DSL. The upper limit is also going to be much higher, so when NTL roll out 20MB in the near future, DSL won't be able to compete. And NTL is genuinely 'always on', but DSL is still a dial-in type service most times.

Even now, with some ISPs in the UK offering 14MB on DSL, it has been shown that you need to live within a few hundred metres of the exchange to stand a chance of getting that. Typically, most people on a 14MB service will get less than 10MB - the current NTL top speed package.

Reason to move away from NTL is the fact that I'm having to pay around £17.99 each month for the speed of only 300kb, at the moment. Since this is the ONLY NTL product I'm using, the price is high (unless, I was using their cable & telephone service). Beside their customer service is just as good as Labour's policies.

Seeing that I'm wrong assuming that I was on DSL (but am instead on "cable"), what's the difference in the way, DSL & ADSL work.

In the mean time, I reckon, out of the 2 options you provided, the "second" option is the best one, since if the signal strength of router falters, I'd not get connection to my PC or laptop but with the second recommendation of yours, if I have a BT socket upstairs then, at least I'd have my current router (along with the modem provided by the www.plus.net) can sit on top of my base unit upstairs, while I can continue to use Internet through my laptop, downstairs.

This saves my money towards getting a "router with built-in modem" & of course, a PCI card for my PC, as well (if I decided to go with the "first" option).

By the way, any idea of www.plus.net's service, since I came across it in a computer magazine.

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linksys wireless g router - adsl version

i have the ethernet (i have cable so dont need a modem) version and its excellent cost me £35

google "BROADBANDBUYER" and you tell it your ISP and it will list routers and modems for it

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