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I've read lots of definitions of it, but I don't quite understand it.

Let's say that I create new software that uses my own code and modified code from open source code that is licensed under the MIT License.

When I sell my software, do I need to provide all of my source code? Or simply put the MIT License text inside a text file and add it to the package?

Your help would be very much appreciated. Thanks!

Edited by PythonNewbie2: n/a

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Last Post by gusano79
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I've read lots of definitions of it, but I don't quite understand it.

I'm assuming you're talking about this one:

Permission is hereby granted, free of charge, to any person obtaining a copy
of this software and associated documentation files (the "Software"), to deal
in the Software without restriction, including without limitation the rights
to use, copy, modify, merge, publish, distribute, sublicense, and/or sell
copies of the Software, and to permit persons to whom the Software is
furnished to do so, subject to the following conditions:

The above copyright notice and this permission notice shall be included in
all copies or substantial portions of the Software.

Let's say that I create new software that uses my own code and modified code from open source code that is licensed under the MIT License.

When I sell my software, do I need to provide all of my source code? Or simply put the MIT License text inside a text file and add it to the package?

Based on my understanding of the license, which is most certainly not legal advice:

  • You are not required to provide source code for anything, but you can if you want to.
  • You must include a copy of the license with the MIT-licensed part.

If I read you right, you sound most concerned about the licensing of your own software. The MIT license clearly gives you the rights to modify and sublicense the third-party code, so you can license your product that uses it any way you want.

I'd consider the modified code to include a "substantial portion" of the MIT-licensed code, so you should include the MIT license and permission notice somewhere with it, but be clear that it is the license for the third-party code--even if you use the MIT license for your own code, this is a separate deal as it identifies the copyright holder, which is not you.

If you want proper legal advice, talk to a legal professional. I'm not one.

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