I don't know a heck of a lot about PHP, but enough to get by usually. This one has me stumped. http://www.signwire.com/dimensional-letters/metal/signage.php is showing up as a live page on five unrelated computers. The problem is that the page does not exist on the server, at least not in the folder the URl shows it to be in, or anyplace else I can find. How is this possible? The page was deleted fromt the server weeks ago as it would have been a duplicate to another existing page.

Wow... That's interesting. I think (and this will sound crazy) that your page was somehow saved as the 404 page. The header response from the server is saying 404 not found:

Date: Fri, 30 Mar 2007 18:51:47 GMT
Server: Apache/1.3.33 (Unix) ApacheJServ/1.1.2 PHP/4.3.10 FrontPage/5.0.2.2635 Rewrit/1.1a
X-Powered-By: PHP/4.3.10
Set-Cookie: swtest=1; expires=Sun, 29-Apr-07 18:51:47 GMT; path=/; domain=.signwire.com
Keep-Alive: timeout=15, max=99
Connection: Keep-Alive
Transfer-Encoding: chunked
Content-Type: text/html

404 Not Found

also try other pages that can't possibly exist and you get this page, for ex:

http://www.signwire.com/dimensional-letters/metal/foobarpwns.xyz

:!: :!: :!:

That's very strange. There's already a 404 page that works well with most of the URLs that have been deleted. (Example) http://www.signwire.com/portable-signs/roadside.php I wonder why it's not working with all the non-existant pages. When I started doing the SEO for this site there was a "signage.php" in every folder. This page seems to be the only one that won't call the 404 page. I know that the webmaster did some trick things when building the site and is generally unresponsive at this point.

Look for a .htaccess file in the top directory and as long as there doesn't appear to be any passwords or other info to keep private, post it here. It may give some clues as to what's happening.

There is no .htaccess file. Just the 404.php page. Hmmmm.... I thought there had to be one. Must be that I'm mistaken because it works for almost all the deleted pages.

This article has been dead for over six months. Start a new discussion instead.