I recently created a post thinking I had blown up my bootloader but I've actually narrowed the problem down to the SSD on which my home directory is mounted. The reason my computer has not been booting is because my system is not mounting my home directory's SSD. This started after I opened my box and installed a new SSD which is now unplugged and not being used. Every since I opened my box my computer wouldn't boot again. I edited /etc/fstab while booted in a live USB and commented out the line telling my computer to auto mount the …

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I just purchased an 240 GB SSD for my older Toshiba Satellite. I would rather not go through trying to save the files from the HDD and install the Linux Mint Debian Edition and then move all the files back, I would like to just be able to clone the HDD to the SSD. Can anyone give me any direction on that? Thanks. ALso, I'd like to maybe get some new memory for the laptop and if possible maybe a CPU as well but I know that's less likely. Here's my laptop -> https://www.cnet.com/products/toshiba-satellite-l355d/specs/ After looking over the specs it …

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Installing Debian 8 in an SSD RAID1 envorionment fails at grub install, yet the same environment, same hardware using HDD's completes successfully. How can this be? ECS H110-C3D MB Startech Marvell 88SE92XX PCIe controller Have tried both Sandisk and ADATA SSD's, both fail at GRUB install. Using WD traditional (spindal) HDD's works successful.

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I've been wanting to build a backup server for my Mint desktop as well as for my Debian media server for a while now. To save money I purchased a Raspberry Pi 2 and I'm going to store it at a friends house who owns an ISP and thus has plenty of bandwidth, and I've lived through one house fire already so I don't feel safe about backing everything up here. As for backing up my home directory I could purchase an SSD or a traditional HD, but for all the media stored on my Debian media server I simply …

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I swapped out my HDD for an SSD in my Win 8.1 Lenovo Y480, replacing the HDD in the optical drive slot using an [HDD Caddy](http://hddcaddy.eu/). The system runs fine. I still see the original copy of the Windows System disk that sits on the HDD in Windows listed as drive I:, in addition to the cloned C: drive which is booting from the SSD. I haven't deleted the old copy of the System Drive from the HDD yet, in case of errors &c. as I'm still trying the system. However, when I plug in external USB HDDs now, none …

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I have installed a Corsair F60 SSD on my Ubuntu 12.04 desktop. It has earlier been used as a system disk with Windows 8 Pro on another system, but it failed and now I want to use it for other purposes. If I use 'hdparm' I get an input/output-error, so I decided to try the Corsair SSD Toolbox which (unfortunately) is a Windows-program. So I installed the program using Wine, and tried to detect my Corsair F60 SSD to see if it was possible to rescue the drive. But when I run the program using Wine it does not detect …

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xp desktop new ssd bios sees it xp device manager sees it and reports it is working properly. File manager fails to see it, fails to assign a letter to it. HOW TO FORMAT IT?

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With all this talk about cheaper laptops for the third world, it’s easy to miss how inexpensive memory has become for us members of the first. I once prophesized to a colleague that by the end of this decade, a terabyte hard drive would be available for less than US$100. I was referring, of course, to conventional magnetic hard drives. I wasn’t really going out on a limb. We’re edging closer to that goal seemingly every day, but Best Buy circular has yet to appear with deals [i]that[/i] good (Samsung [URL= http://www.businesswire.com/portal/site/home/permalink/?ndmViewId=news_view&newsId=20080521006156&newsLang=en]in a May 21 announcement[/URL] unveiled a one terabyte …

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Solid State Disks are ideally suited to laptop use, being small and thin but rugged as well. The lack of moving parts is pretty much a win-win for mobile usage, making these units much less prone to the knocks and drops of daily life than your average mechanical hard drive. The only real downside has been, and to be honest remains, the higher cost; which is why you still tend to find SSD storage restricted to specification for higher end machines. Actually 'only' is a bit of an exaggeration as SSD is becoming a popular choice amongst fans of external …

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[ATTACH=RIGHT]16858[/ATTACH]You may have noticed that solid-state drives (SSDs), those flash memory-based drives that were touted as an alternative to hard disks, have remained stuck in the 80GB to 160GB size range and the prices are not coming down. There's a good reason for that. Starting in early 2009, the price of NAND flash memory took off, almost doubling in price, and proceeded to stop the momentum of SSD as a storage alternative in its tracks. But now, thanks accelerated deployment of new manufacturing plants, the supply of NAND flash is poised to drastically increase. This in turn should help drive …

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John Tu is the President and Co-founder of Kingston Technology which just happens to be one of the biggest providers of memory products on the planet, so when he talks about trends and developments in the memory market a lot of people start listening. Especially when he does so against a backdrop of a global economic downturn that has hit the tech industry hard. "Too many companies producing memory chips have caused prices to fall over the last months and consolidation should help the industry correct itself" Tu admits. However, when it comes to those companies that can weather the …

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American chip maker [URL="http://www.freescale.com"]Freescale Semiconductor[/URL] has today announced the development of a magnetoresistive random-access memory (MRAM) chip which can maintain data using magnetic properties and not the traditional electrical charge methodology. Think of it in terms of storing data more like a hard drive, albeit a very small one indeed, and you are on the right conceptual tracks. Unlike flash memory, MRAM does not degrade over time, does not need any power in order to store the data and is lightning quick when it comes to read/write speeds. Think in terms of nanoseconds in fact! Each MRAM chip is comprised …

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The End.