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So, I'm deciding on my major and I can't decide between CS or CE, now I know that CE is a mix of both Engineering and programming but if I wanted to get a job working as a software engineer, would a degree in Computer Engineering be "acceptable" in place of a job that says that they only require a Computer Science degree?

What about if a job that requires a CE degree, will they accept a CS degree in place?

Or will both reject me if I don't have the only degree they specify (IE: will that software engineer job reject me because I have a degree in CE rather then CS?)

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Last Post by ithelp
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The main thing that I'm worried about is, if I go the route of CE (because people say that CS is boring, and if you get a degree in CE you'll be more of an AI programming, robotics, electrical guy with programming background whereas in CS you'll just have a more deep rooted understanding of computing languages.

I'm worried that if I get a degree in CE, and I want to get a job as a computer programming working as a software engineer, or working at a game company or something, and getting rejected because I have a degree in CE and not CS.

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The main thing that I'm worried about is, if I go the route of CE (because people say that CS is boring, and if you get a degree in CE you'll be more of an AI programming, robotics, electrical guy with programming background whereas in CS you'll just have a more deep rooted understanding of computing languages.

I'm worried that if I get a degree in CE, and I want to get a job as a computer programming working as a software engineer, or working at a game company or something, and getting rejected because I have a degree in CE and not CS.

Most of the developers that I work with (Application Development, mostly data mining, data collection (as in field engineering inspection data), and reporting) have masters degrees in Computer Science. That said, one of our best programmers has a degree in US History, my boss is a Forester (and a very good Oracle programmer), I'm an Electronics Engineering dropout... I don't believe that I would ever consider the difference between a CS or a CE degree. What we think about in hiring a programmer is the type of skills and experience the candidate brings to the table. Most companies hiring programmers don't consider the degree to represent skills OR experience - it's proof that you know how to learn. No college teaches programming in the ways that it's actually done in the real world (ask ANYONE who's been out of school for a few years and working in IT).

To help yourself make a better decision - look at what the schools are actually teaching for your degree, and don't assume that the 'hard core' skills are actually outside of your job path. Learn things that are fun for YOU - if it's within the IT realm, it WILL do you some good. Do you really want to be just another programmer, or do you desire that extra bit of knowledge that allows you to think just a little better than the next guy, and to come up with creative solutions?

One of the best programmers I know has a masters in CE, and he has such insight into the inner workings of the machines we program that it's downright scary. He knows his stuff because he knows how it works under the hood, and you'd be hard pressed to find a better Applications Programmer.

If there had been as much delineation between the disciplines back in the 70's when I started, I guess I would be asking the exact same questions. From the real world, and for most normal jobs, it is not at all unusual to jump from one discipline to the other once you get into the workforce and start to figure out what you actually would like to do for the rest of your life. It's fun, in any case. I know other people enjoy their jobs, but I can't imagine a more fulfilling career than the one that chose me.

Good luck, and happy coding!

Ned

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Here's a good page describing the differences between CS and CE. I'm a CE major and been working on Web Dev and now as a software engineer. As Ned pointed out, what matters is what you can show to the potential employer and what you can bring in to the company. But knowing what your interests are would definitely helps in choosing the right major.

http://www.eng.buffalo.edu/compscie_vs_compeng.php

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The main thing that I'm worried about is, if I go the route of CE (because people say that CS is boring, and if you get a degree in CE you'll be more of an AI programming, robotics, electrical guy with programming background whereas in CS you'll just have a more deep rooted understanding of computing languages.

I'm worried that if I get a degree in CE, and I want to get a job as a computer programming working as a software engineer, or working at a game company or something, and getting rejected because I have a degree in CE and not CS.

Very few company work on robotics, so your scope would be limited and who said the work is very challenging , you have to maintain millions of lines of software code only and which is ofcourse boring
do not expect you will be asked to design at the first day.

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Very few company work on robotics, so your scope would be limited and who said the work is very challenging , you have to maintain millions of lines of software code only and which is ofcourse boring
do not expect you will be asked to design at the first day.

Really? How long have you worked in robotics? Isn't there new development going on with new robots and therefore new code? Don't you have to write new code every time you change the work a robot does? What makes interfacing with the robot nonchallenging?

There a 4 Robotics companies in my area alone, not to mention all the companies that deal with robots that aren't strictly Robotics companies...

Please substantiate your allegations with some verifiable facts and references.

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Really? How long have you worked in robotics? Isn't there new development going on with new robots and therefore new code? Don't you have to write new code every time you change the work a robot does? What makes interfacing with the robot nonchallenging?

There a 4 Robotics companies in my area alone, not to mention all the companies that deal with robots that aren't strictly Robotics companies...

Please substantiate your allegations with some verifiable facts and references.

You are absoultely correct every time you have to write millions of line of code , writing so many lines of code is quite thankless job,and fixing bugs like the robot falls down after walking few steps is a nightmare debugging is much more difficult than that of ordinary software.
Which city are you located, my current city does not have many companies working in robotics , I guess this is an international forum , so may be if the original poster can tell which city he belongs to, and how many robotics company are there it could help

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