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Teen pop sensation Justin Bieber has already conquered Twitter, and now it would appear he has become the undisputed King of YouTube after knocking Lady Gaga off of the 'most viewed video ever' spot. According to a posting on Twitter by YouTube, Bieber first overtook Lady Gaga on Thursday night but was soon beaten down again as Gaga fans viewed the Bad Romance video by the thousand.

biebervideo001.jpg However, within 48 hours the inevitable weight of Bieber fans has taken its toll and the Baby video has now pulled well clear with 247,991,181 views compared to 'just' 246,609,606 views for Lady Gaga. To put this in to some kind of perspective, the third most viewed YouTube video of all time is 'Charlie bit my finger - again' featuring a cute kid and his baby brother with 210,601,397 views.

Lady Gaga has, so far, remained quiet about the YouTube battle. Not so Bieber who commented via Twitter that "what is goin on with the BABY video on youtube is crazy...i started on youtube so the support...well i just need to say thank u" and later added "someone just showed me and i just need to say that @ladygaga is an incredible artist who have great respect 4. and her vid is incredible".

Of course, not everyone will be pleased to see Bieber grab the record for having the most viewed YouTube video of all time. We have already seen the development of the Shaved Bieber tool which censors all images and mentions of Justin Bieber from the Web for anyone installing it in their browser client. It has even been reported that Twitter tweaked a trending algorithm in order to prevent Bieber from topping the trending list all the time.

Most recently, however, Bieber was in the news after hackers exploited his popularity on YouTube by redirecting would be viewers to porn sites and causing offensive pop-up messages to appear when people searched for his music videos.


As Editorial Director and Managing Analyst with IT Security Thing I am putting more than two decades of consulting experience into providing opinionated insight regarding the security threat landscape for IT security professionals. As an Editorial Fellow with Dennis Publishing, I bring more than two decades of writing experience across the technology industry into publications such as Alphr, IT Pro and (in good old fashioned print) PC Pro. I also write for SC Magazine UK and Infosecurity, as well as The Times and Sunday Times newspapers. Along the way I have been honoured with a Technology Journalist of the Year award, and three Information Security Journalist of the Year awards. Most humbling, though, was the Enigma Award for 'lifetime contribution to IT security journalism' bestowed on me in 2011.

This is what the music industry has been widdled down to? YouTube views? Though I was kinda hoping they would be forced to fight to the death for the title. I think that would have been a win win for all of us.

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