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Last Post by rotten69
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W3schools is a horrible reference, and it should not be used for anything other than a reference - if at all. I do not know of any "good" video tutorials, but you could still try some of these: Google, Mozilla, HTML Dog , and W3C.

Regards,
Arkinder

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W3Schools.com is only a horrible reference in your opinion. From what I see HTML Dog is a horrible reference, but, that is just my opinion.

W3Schools.com, does not have video tutorials, however with each tutorial, you are able to try out the examples right on their site. That is how I started and it still helps me from time to time to this day. Check it out, and if you don't like it, ask for more suggestions. I would say to stay away from W3C as you will probably just get confused.

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W3Schools.com is only a horrible reference in your opinion. From what I see HTML Dog is a horrible reference, but, that is just my opinion.

W3Schools.com, does not have video tutorials, however with each tutorial, you are able to try out the examples right on their site. That is how I started and it still helps me from time to time to this day. Check it out, and if you don't like it, ask for more suggestions. I would say to stay away from W3C as you will probably just get confused.

Not at all, W3schools contains incorrect information in every single tutorial that it offers. Being wrong does make a horrible reference; unless of course you enjoy blindly stabbing in the dark for an answer because you don't know what the hell you're doing. If you are still using W3schools as a reference then you really should not be trying to teach other people because you clearly do not know what you are talking about. I apologize for my bluntness on the situation, but I am absolutely sick of people posting W3schools as a "good" place to learn HTML, CSS, or any markup/language. It is simply a bad site.

While I won't disagree that the W3C could be confusing to a beginner, it doesn't mean that he or she shouldn't know about it. The most accurate information, and explanations for why why the HMTL markup and CSS language work the way they do is there.

Regards,
Arkinder

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WOW, I didn't realize someone would nerd rage so much over trying to help someone else.

limonzmn, apparently I don't know what I am talking about. With that said, I've used W3Schools.com for years and have been doing just fine.

Arkinder, please feel free to post where every error is as this will help people to not say it is a "good" resource. However, since you don't seem to be the most professional person, please forgive me for not just taking your word for it.

On a side note if you plan on learning HTML5, I've enjoyed reading the DiveIntoHTML5 by Mark Pilgram: http://diveintohtml5.info/

Arkinder, please feel free to tell us how this is a terrible resource as well and where all the mistakes are.

Proper arguments would really be encouraged rather than bashing someone.

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WOW, I didn't realize someone would nerd rage so much over trying to help someone else.

limonzmn, apparently I don't know what I am talking about. With that said, I've used W3Schools.com for years and have been doing just fine.

Arkinder, please feel free to post where every error is as this will help people to not say it is a "good" resource. However, since you don't seem to be the most professional person, please forgive me for not just taking your word for it.

On a side note if you plan on learning HTML5, I've enjoyed reading the DiveIntoHTML5 by Mark Pilgram: http://diveintohtml5.info/

Arkinder, please feel free to tell us how this is a terrible resource as well and where all the mistakes are.

Proper arguments would really be encouraged rather than bashing someone.

Start here: w3fools. If that isn't enough then I will be more than happy to give you more links. I would hardly call it a "nerd rage." After all, I did apologize for the bluntness of the statement. Obviously the professional way to handle things is to ask me to bash every link that you post. If you really want to give me something to bash, post a link of your portfolio. After your years of experience I'm sure it is quite lengthy.

I have not ever met a well known web designer that uses W3schools, and it is with good reason. Not just because of incorrect information, but because it leaves out so many important concepts for new web developers, while sloppily presenting information. In addition they offer "certificates" when they are not even associated with the W3C or recognized by any major company. I will admit that HTML Dog isn't either, but at least it doesn't boast something that it can't really offer (if there is any specific reason you believe it is a bad tutorial site, then let me know). However, Mozilla is the official browser of the W3C, Google is well, Google. And the W3C is unarguably the most accurate resource. Of course I am sure you will agree with me saying that tutorials are nothing more than a reference to help you become more familiar with the syntax of a language or markup. And that practice and experience is how you truly learn.

However all of this is completely useless to the OP, and I won't be continuing the conversation.

Regards,
Arkinder

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w3fools - excellent resource, I'll be reading this

Correct me if I'm wrong but Amaya is the W3C browser, isn't it?

http://www.whatwg.org/ is also a similar reference to W3C

Of course I am sure you will agree with me saying that tutorials are nothing more than a reference to help you become more familiar with the syntax of a language or markup. And that practice and experience is how you truly learn.

This is exactly why I like W3Schools.com, as it allows you to change the code and see the results for yourself right there as you learn.

Maybe we can agree to disagree on W3Schools ;)

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Correct me if I'm wrong but Amaya is the W3C browser, isn't it?

Amaya is, and I had actually forgotten about it until now (probably because I knew it as Tamaya). I personally view it as more of an editing tool rather than an actual browser. However at one point in time Mozilla was the official browser (don't quote me on this as I still can't find the documentation, but I have it saved somewhere). I guess that was just quite a while ago. :P

http://www.whatwg.org/ is also a similar reference to W3C

This is actually really interesting - specifically the second paragraph.

What is the WHATWG?

The Web Hypertext Application Technology Working Group (WHATWG) is a growing community of people interested in evolving the Web. It focuses primarily on the development of HTML and APIs needed for Web applications.

The WHATWG was founded by individuals of Apple, the Mozilla Foundation, and Opera Software in 2004, after a W3C workshop. Apple, Mozilla and Opera were becoming increasingly concerned about the W3C’s direction with XHTML, lack of interest in HTML and apparent disregard for the needs of real-world authors. So, in response, these organisations set out with a mission to address these concerns and the Web Hypertext Application Technology Working Group was born.

This is because when XHTML was introduced everyone thought it was a stricter version of HTML that was meant to replace HTML - W3Schools included :). But it wasn't, and still isn't. XHTML is used for parsing XML data in your document - that's it. Even now it's a common misconception that XHTML Doctypes should be used for HTML documents. On any new HTML document the HTML 4.01 Strict Doctype should be used. I only say this because HTML5 is still a draft. However, since HTML is no longer SGML-based and thus doesn't require a DTD, then the HTML5 Doctype will work just fine.

This is exactly why I like W3Schools.com, as it allows you to change the code and see the results for yourself right there as you learn.

I agree that it's a useful tool in that way. However the way the information is laid out, the lack of proper explanations, incorrect information, an incomplete reference, and just general disregard for real world applications of what is being learned is an absolute joke. You would be much better off just downloading a free IDE, which you would have to learn to use sooner or later.

Maybe we can agree to disagree on W3Schools

Eh :P


Regards,
Arkinder

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In addition to the sites listed, there are some great book out there as well. 'Learning Web Design' by Jennier Robbins is a great one.

Edited by Ezzaral: Snipped 'fake sig' link. Please restrict such links to your site-wide user signature, which can be edited from the user control panel.

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OR, you can get a current book on webdesign and HTML/css from the bookstore or library and bookmark http://validator.w3.org/ to check your code. (The Dummies guides are a pretty good resource if you don't know the first thing about whatever. Once you get past that, it depends on your learning style.)

Edited by Dandello: n/a

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well the best way to do according to me is to start with any of these and then for each topics look for tutorials sites or blog and see what is the difference and improve your concept by combining all the info from all resources.

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@jessie.. That's a good way of learning new concepts and cementing them in the brain. However, I must admit that it takes more time than how much you want to put into learning things.

I like your way by the way. Does anyone know how else new concepts can be cemented in one's brain? As you learn new things, the old things you know, are kindda getting dusty!

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