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Last Post by dandimmitt
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Yeah I know i'm just talking too much here but I recommend anyone not without a cooling fan to add one.When I only relied on the built-in fans , my whole huge room would get awfully hot in 4 hours but now after attaching a new cooling fan everything's good.Thought I'm not sure whether a new fan wll pressurise the motherboard in any way.

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That would save on your heating bill if it heats up your room. But seriously if it does that, then the PC is running too hot you need to get an antec fan, and a bigger heatsink.

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m

Antec :)

huh?????

Cases, yes! Case fans, yes! Power supplies, yes!

But CPU coolers? I don't think so! They're a bit-player at best!


Have a look at some of the options on offer here:
http://www.pccasegear.com.au/category23_1.htm
to get started on generating some ideas of what you want, then check online stores in your local area to find availability and pricing. What processor do you have in your system, because the type will effect what you need.

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What would be a good brand of heatsinks and fans for my cpu. my cpu is running pretty hot and i need it to run cooler brfore i fry it.

Which type of processor do you use? I recently purchased a thermalright xp-90 and it is UNBELIEVABLE. I cannot believe the efficiency of it. Of course I have a pretty decent 92mm fan blowing air down into it.

But my load temps at stock speed (2.2ghz amd 64 3500+) used to be aroudn 131 farenheit, overclocked to 2.4ghz, i used to see load temps in 140ish range. Now with my heatsink, idle is 96 farenheit (vs 106 before).

With an overclock at 2.5ghz I dont see load temps rise above 117 I would say, an most of the time temps are in 109-111 range. Doom 3 at high settings max everything else, 4x aa, temps never exceed 109 after 1+ hours of playing.

If you can afford ~55 dollars, go with a thermalright xp-90, some arctic silver 5 thermalcompound, and a decent 92/90 mm fan. You WONT regret it.

Oh, as a side note, you must have an amd 64 processor or a pentium 4 processor.

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That would save on your heating bill if it heats up your room. But seriously if it does that, then the PC is running too hot you need to get an antec fan, and a bigger heatsink.

Correct me if I am wrong.. but wouldnt a lot of heat being displaced into the room mean the computer is being cooled greatly... its when the computer isnt putting out a lot of heat that you might have to worry?

Before my new heatsink/fan, my case temp was lower.. and barely any heat came out of my exahust fans. Now with my new equipment, my cpu runs soo much cooler and more heat is dispersed out of my case, and a general case temp increase (like 4 degrees celcius at full load) is witnessed.

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m


huh?????

Cases, yes! Case fans, yes! Power supplies, yes!

But CPU coolers? I don't think so! They're a bit-player at best!


Have a look at some of the options on offer here:
http://www.pccasegear.com.au/category23_1.htm
to get started on generating some ideas of what you want, then check online stores in your local area to find availability and pricing. What processor do you have in your system, because the type will effect what you need.

hahha :cheesy: yeah.. about antec.. they make great cases. I wasnt aware that they did cooling... Go with thermalright or swiftech if you have lots of money! I prefer thermalright.

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My personal terrorizer is running an insanely beefy combination. I've got a Swiftech MCX-462-v heatsink:

http://www.newegg.com/app/viewProductDesc.asp?description=35-108-020&depa=0

and a Vantec Tornado 92mm fan:

http://www.newegg.com/app/ViewProductDesc.asp?description=11-999-613&depa=0

This is on a Barton XP 2500+, no overclock, running with cheapy thermal grease, and I NEVER peak over 40 deg C under load. And, that's with a fan controller, running on low! If I crank the fan controller to high, the thing sounds like a hair dryer, but I can get it going pretty well at 37-38degC under load. I've got a tube of Artic Silver thermal paste, I'm thinking of redoing the rig, and including some of that, to see how my temps run.

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You're most likely aware of this Alex, but for the benefit of philpotrebel (and others reading this) the following instructions should be followed when removing a heatsink and replaceing or refitting it:

http://www.arcticsilver.com/arctic_silver_instructions.htm

The procedures described in that which relate to cleaning the processor and heatsink are relevent no matter WAHAT type of thermal transfer material is used afterwards. A processor heatsink should NEVER be removed and refitted without cleaning the surfaces and applying new material.

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You're most likely aware of this Alex, but for the benefit of philpotrebel (and others reading this) the following instructions should be followed when removing a heatsink and replaceing or refitting it:

http://www.arcticsilver.com/arctic_silver_instructions.htm

The procedures described in that which relate to cleaning the processor and heatsink are relevent no matter WAHAT type of thermal transfer material is used afterwards. A processor heatsink should NEVER be removed and refitted without cleaning the surfaces and applying new material.

Boo. Who needs that? Tap water's always worked for me! ;)

BIG JOKE! PLEASE DON'T DO THAT!

Yes, Catweazle's definitely right on this one. It's especially true for a high-end heatsink, like my MCX-462-v, as the mirror finish that it has needs to be free of foreign objects, including other brands of thermal grease.

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It's especially true for a high-end heatsink, like my MCX-462-v, as the mirror finish that it has needs to be free of foreign objects, including other brands of thermal grease.

Once you use a heatsink.. unless you lap it, it will not have the same efficiency as a brand new one. Well I will rephrase that. If you had a great heatsink with a crappy thermal compound, and then cleaned off the thermal compound from the cpu and heatsink, and put on arctic silver 5, you will NOT get the same performance as if you had a new heatsink of the same model and put the good thermal compound on to start. I guess that the thermal compound gets into micro crevices or something along those lines. Once you have a crappy thermal compound (or even worse, parafin wax, which comes on a lot of stock heatsink/cpu) you can never get all of it out, even if you try really hard (short of lapping the surface).

Bottom line, if you are going to upgrade to a new heatsink, use arctic silver 5 first!!

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You're most likely aware of this Alex, but for the benefit of philpotrebel (and others reading this) the following instructions should be followed when removing a heatsink and replaceing or refitting it:

http://www.arcticsilver.com/arctic_silver_instructions.htm

The procedures described in that which relate to cleaning the processor and heatsink are relevent no matter WAHAT type of thermal transfer material is used afterwards. A processor heatsink should NEVER be removed and refitted without cleaning the surfaces and applying new material.

thanks cat, that was exactly the information that i was looking for!
dan

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