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I have a laptop i just got for christmas its a Toshiba A35-S159
and it has a mobile processor in it with a wireless network card built into it. I was just wondering if it is a wireless B or G type. If you know anything about this or what the difference betwwen wireless B and G just post a reply. Thanks:cool:

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Last Post by caperjack
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I am not entirely sure this will work (I don't have a windows laptop in front of me) but running ipconfig /all from the command line might tell you what you need to know. Do this:

*Click on the start button.
*go to run
*type "cmd" (without the quotes) and hit enter
*in the command prompt window type "ipconfig /all" (w/o the quotes -- make sure that the slash is going the right way :-)
*The window will display a bunch of text. At some point it should say the make and model of your network cards. Look for the wireless one, and see if it says 802.11B or G.

Good luck!

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Thakx for the info i found that out by looking on compusa and looking at the specs im thkning about buying a router but i dont no whether i should buy a wireless or a wired
Thanx

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Thakx for the info i found that out by looking on compusa and looking at the specs im thkning about buying a router but i dont no whether i should buy a wireless or a wired
Thanx

I'm pretty sure all wireless routers have wired ethernet ports built in, along with the wireless stuff.

Access points however, they normally do not have a hub/switch built into the until.

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If money is an issue for you, go B. Any Internet connection you get is gonna be well below 11Mbps. This article at PCWorld [http://www.pcworld.com/news/article/0,aid,110425,00.asp] says average Cable modem speeds are 708kbps while DSL is around 467kbps. Either way, both are WAY below 11Mbps. Therefore the only advantage to G is if you are going to do large file transfers from one computer to another on the wireless network. My guess is that you won't be, and since G is pricier than B, my recommendation would be 802.11B.

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