3
Contributors
7
Replies
8
Views
6 Years
Discussion Span
Last Post by rubberman
0

Assuming you want to use the modem for a phone internet connection, you need to configure the PPP (point-to-point protocol) tool so it can dial out and make the connection. It's not hard, but it is not automatically configured when you install the system. It needs to know what phone # to call, baud rate of the modem, etc.

0

Assuming you want to use the modem for a phone internet connection,

I really do not understand the process that you have post. Please say it clearly what I
have to do now.

0

I really do not understand the process that you have post. Please say it clearly what I
have to do now.

Oh Dear! What you need to do is "Study and Learn". I don't mean that in a nasty or condescending way either. Let me explain. First, there are just too many types of Modem, and this rules out any kind of Step by Step answer. Second, you must have a better grasp of the terminology and technology before you can expect to get anywhere. I really do feel your pain - I've been there with the Modem thing. You have to understand that getting this thing to work may require many hours of effort, and unfortunately, most of the effort has to be yours - unless of course you have a benevolent friend who can help you out. What I can do is help to get you started on the education part:

1) Modem: Short for Modulator-Demodulator. This is a device translates binary numeric data into sound (beeps and whistles), which the phone line can understand, and conversely, translates returning data in the form of sound back into binary numeric data. The term has been expanded to include devices that don't actually use sound any more (e.g., a DSL modem), but the process is nevertheless analogous.

2) Baud: Short for Bits-Audible. This is a reference to the original scheme of translating data into a series of beeps and whistles which were in fact audible. It is now commonly used to refer to the number of bits per second that are encoded or decoded by the modem. All modems have some predefined baud rates at which they can operate. You will need to know what baud rates your ISP can accept.

3) ppp: This is an acronym for Point-to-Point-Protocol. It refers to the technical details your computer uses to communicate over the phone to the company that provides your internet service( your ISP). There are other protocols, this one is just the most common. You will need to know what protocol your ISP uses.

Read up on all these things. You will also need to know the exact model and type of your modem. Then google for any known issues with linux support for that modem. Armed with this new knowledge, you should be able to make a pretty good start on getting the modem working.

Edited by sbesch: Added comments about needing to know baud rates and protocol ISP uses

0

What you need to do is "Study and Learn"

I really want to connect a Qubee(Wimax) modem by which I can brows internet.
Thank you.

0

Ok. I assume this device is connected via a USB port? If so, go to the command line and execute the command "lsusb". Report the output back here. We need to see if this device has support in the kernel before we go any further. If the device is connected via a PCI, PCMCI, or other bus slot (other than USB), the the command would be "lspci".

0

Ok. I assume this device is connected via a USB port? If so, go to the command line and execute the command "lsusb". Report the output back here. We need to see if this device has support in the kernel before we go any further. If the device is connected via a PCI, PCMCI, or other bus slot (other than USB), the the command would be "lspci".

Yes. This device is connected via a USB port.

0

Ok, so post the output of lsusb --verbose. That will give us as much information as the hardware probe will provide.

This topic has been dead for over six months. Start a new discussion instead.
Have something to contribute to this discussion? Please be thoughtful, detailed and courteous, and be sure to adhere to our posting rules.