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I am active in another thread that is turning into a bit of a flame-war. (So I thought i would bring the fight to the lounge! :-)
HERE

So I wanted To Start A New Thread, as I couldn't find one. So, Please only reply if your answer contributes something to this thread, preferably:

1. What Reg Cleaner You Use
2. Why Do You Use It?
3. Is There Anything Unique About It?
4. If you don't use one, then why?


++> Please keep this an upbuilding conversation people.

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Last Post by lasitha2005d
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  • reg cleaners can do more harm than good. The only time a reg cleaner might be of any value is when you install and uninstall many programs that do not do a good job of cleaning up after themselves during uninstall. And even then its questionable to use one because … Read More

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I used to use advanced system care 3, but it is a resource hog.
Now I use Glary Utilities. why? Not for the reg cleaner, (which seems good). I know in older versions the registry cleaner used to wipe some files, like the desktop.ini file, that tells your computer what file to display in mycomputer, but that seems to have been addressed, now. but all the other apps:

Batch Uninstaller:
you can set batch mode, and hit uninstall, it goes bang, bang, bang. it is HEAPS more efficient than the windows uninstaller. Just be careful though. I have seen it uninstall programs that weren't ticked.

Disk Analysis:
it gives you a visual overview of where your space is being taken up on your drive, so you can find big files/folders and take any needed action.

Duplicate Files finder:
the name says it all

disk cleaner:
remove temp files and the like

file undelete.

handy for deleted file recovery.
(I use Easeus Data Recovery Pro For the more serious stuff)

file shredder.
if you want that folder gone-gone.

file encrypter.
if you want that file private.

registry defrag.
it can make the registry significantly smaller. I have never had a problem with this tool.

PLUS the One-Click-Optimiser:
the item that you were just asking about. I disable the spyware and track remover tools.

I use sysinternal autoruns for the startup manager. becareful. it is not a tool for beginners. You could seriously do some "interesting things" to your computer with this app.

for spyware I tend towards
spybot S&D.
It is freeware, and up to date. usually, it can seem to be doing not much. I find it finds the most stuff in the last moments of it's scan.

or
Malwarebytes

I usually only use these when something is already gone wrong on a client's PC.

but I run ESET Smart Security on all my stuff, and have no need for SS&D. (I am a licenced reseller for ESET, the best out there in my personal opinion.) I will not provide a link to it, as I do not wish to appear to be selling anything.

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REgisters cleaners are useless, and anyone who tells you to use one, should quit programming, and become a garbageman or something! Registers do not slow down your computer, it is a lie. You should not use it!

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reg cleaners can do more harm than good. The only time a reg cleaner might be of any value is when you install and uninstall many programs that do not do a good job of cleaning up after themselves during uninstall. And even then its questionable to use one because the cleaner could wipe out important stuff in the registry that other programs may use. But if you want to use a reg cleaner anyway, always back up the registry before doing anything.

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Some good registry cleaner and optimizers:

1. Tune-Up Utilities
2. Advanced System Optimizer
3. CCleaner
4. Comodo System Cleaner
5. Registry mechanic

I've used all of them in the past (currently on Tune-Up and CCleaner) and no complaints concerning any

Also, have Revo Uninstaller, which provides the option to clean the registry right after uninstalling an app

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Well said sergent. Almost as bad as using Spybot S&D still :).

:-( I am cut deeply :-(
hehe.

Funny, that thing with woodman.

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reg cleaners can do more harm than good. The only time a reg cleaner might be of any value is when you install and uninstall many programs that do not do a good job of cleaning up after themselves during uninstall. And even then its questionable to use one because the cleaner could wipe out important stuff in the registry that other programs may use. But if you want to use a reg cleaner anyway, always back up the registry before doing anything.

^^ I agree 100% ^^

I typically use ccleaner after uninstalling a program - there are always registry remnants that need to be removed.
But, I also doublecheck what is being removed and I know what I am looking at when I do so.

Many people don't know what they are doing and blindly click "fix" without knowing or backing up the keys and values they are removing.... and live to regret it..... ;)

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^^ I agree 100% ^^

I typically use ccleaner after uninstalling a program - there are always registry remnants that need to be removed.
But, I also doublecheck what is being removed and I know what I am looking at when I do so.

Many people don't know what they are doing and blindly click "fix" without knowing or backing up the keys and values they are removing.... and live to regret it.....

Majority of users do not know what they are doing. Remember, this is programming/computer geek forum, and three is not that many of us in the world. The registry cleaners are aimed at the users. So it is better just to not use it for anyone.

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I'd have to disagree. I use Glary Utilities and have found that the Reg Cleaner in that does a fine job. My PC is always measurably faster if it finds anything to clean up. I AM a programmer.

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And how do you "measure' that faster speed?
Could just be the old placebo effect.

Erm, with a stopwatch.

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So, after you run your reg cleaner, you sit there with a stop watch?
What process are you timing? How much faster is it?
Sorry, but I fail to see how clearing out a few registry entires will allow a program to run faster.

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Here is just one example, as I don't intend to spend ages discussing this.

I installed an application which is reasonably common, ie Norton Internet Security 2011. I then timed my startup to the point where the system gave me control of mouse and keyboard, ie all autoruns completed. Time 59 seconds.

I uninstalled Norton Internet Security 2011 and restarted. I then restarted AGAIN and timed startup. 52 seconds.

I then ran Glary Utilities, just cleaning the registry, restarted twice. Time 49 seconds.

I then ran Glary Utilities Registry Defrag and restarted twice. Start time 44 seconds.

I rest my case.

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Here is just one example, as I don't intend to spend ages discussing this.

I installed an application which is reasonably common, ie Norton Internet Security 2011. I then timed my startup to the point where the system gave me control of mouse and keyboard, ie all autoruns completed. Time 59 seconds.

I uninstalled Norton Internet Security 2011 and restarted. I then restarted AGAIN and timed startup. 52 seconds.

I then ran Glary Utilities, just cleaning the registry, restarted twice. Time 49 seconds.

I then ran Glary Utilities Registry Defrag and restarted twice. Start time 44 seconds.

I rest my case.

WoW; wish they had a registry cleaner for my Car ,maybe i could shave a few seconds of the commute to work .

i don't watch how long it take to boot my computer when i first turn it on ,usual gone for my morning psssssssssss.lol

Edited by caperjack: n/a

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WoW; wish they had a registry cleaner for my Car ,maybe i could shave a few seconds of the commute to work .

i don't watch how long it take to boot my computer when i first turn it on ,usual gone for my morning psssssssssss.lol

Hah! A bit off topic, but what the hell...

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in my early days i made mistake of using registry cleaners ,reg mechanic i think was one ,and just let it fix what it found and totally screwed my computer,but used another one running in real,that never caused any problems a few yrs back ,cant remember its name ,but it never caused any problems ,now all are use are registry editing programs like ,ccleaner,malwarebytes,combofix,firefox[not so much anymore]superyantispyware,msconfig, and other such tool

edit ,Tune-Up Utilities was the one i used in real time a few yrs back with good luck

Edited by caperjack: n/a

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Well this thread is quite interesting. When it comes to optimizing most of the free software allow users to shape or tweak registry settings (only the registry will not fix e'thing anyway). But a drawback is they are not thoroughly tested for cases. Paid once have similar problems however. Just paid does not mean it is good. Some people think paid stuff are good. Somewhat true but not always.

Well if someone is professional enough, he does not need a bunch of software to do optimizing. Manual work is better than software. Many registry cleaners remove entities which are isolated, but not every time. The categorization has false negatives for many reg cleaners. CCleaner is ok. Not 100% accurate but its fine than other freeware.

However if a user does have no understanding about registry settings or registry it is better to learn first and do some stuff manually. These software are made for professionals (I have seen jholland says the same in an earlier thread and I also agree with him) to ease their tasks (sometimes screw their tasks). So must be used with caution. Must understand how to backup and restore registry. Especially when performing a registry defrag, must know what is happening. A dangerous thing to do if the user is not prepared.

It is fine to use an uninstaller which will remove entries after performing the task.
Disk optimizer do the same thing. Most of those do the same task, defraging, cleaning, backing up. Not much a difference than Windows tools. But most DOs provide automation. That is why they are popular. But when comes to backing up, commercial products are way better (such as Diskeeper and SymantecNB / Ghost).
I have used TuneUp too 2-3 years ago (not to optimized much) cos it has some nice small tools to explore and view some inside stuff, rather than using a cmd all the time (support tools etc).

But I still believe that a professional (an educated person) will have a schedule and best practices when using a PC and it will keep the system optimized with built in tools.

When it comes to malware, it is a different story. It is not optimizing anyway. It is troubleshooting. I am currently using Bitdefender. One of the best (used for 5 years). Even it is not capable of mitigating 100% of nasties. I manully remove anything goes bypassing it (only 3-4 occasions for the entire time block).

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