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This has to be THE mother of all networking problems. It all began when we purchased a 15m CAT5e cable, a Billion 5100 Router, and two NetComm NP1100 Fast Ethernet Adaptors. My family has two PCs running Win98E, and we thought that, since we have dial-up, it would be feasible to place the router in my sister's room with dial-up, and share it across to my computer. Well, after installing the two cards, the router, some drill holes and the cable, it all looked pretty neat. The Billion 5100 is supposed to be able to be pinged from any computer-and the first time, it worked-on both computers. Then came pinging each other. And the result? My sister (192.168.1.100) can ping me (192.168.1.101), but I can't ping her back. After reading some instructions here from another thread, and some LAN testing (with IPX/SPX), I thought that it would work if:

1. I deleted all networking protocols and adapters from both computers
2. Deleted the *.nfo files of the networking card in the info folders
3. Restart, and Plug-and-Play should kick in and install the cards.

That worked with my computer, but my sister's computer didn't like it. After restart, it gave me a "Blue Screen of Death" with a conflict of VxD INSPKFLT(01) and Device, and told me Windows was corrupt. So I restarted, went into safe mode, installed a different adapter to mine, restarted, installed the networking card software, restarted again, removed the fake adapter and tried to ping the router (192.168.1.254) and guess what? It didn't work! and after all that, only my computer was able to ping the router. This is ridiculous. And now, my sister can't even ping me!

HELP!!!!!

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Last Post by juanjdf
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When you get the hardware installation correct, if the two machines are each getting an IP address like they were, they should have been able to ping each other and the router. If they couldn't then check that you don't have a software firewall enabled on either machine. We don't know what operating system you're using, but XP has a soft firewall built in and lots of anti-virus also comes with one, so you could have one and not know it.

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