0

how i'll setup my home network?

two xp pc.
using lan card.
how to cut and join the cables with the clips?

5
Contributors
7
Replies
8
Views
10 Years
Discussion Span
Last Post by jbennet
0

how to cut and join the cables with the clips?

Your question is a bit unclear. Do you mean that you want to connect the two computers directly together with an Ethernet cable, as opposed to networking them together with a router or a switch?

1

For a crossover cable:

End 1 : T568A

Pin 1 - Orange/White
Pin 2 - Orange
Pin 3 - Green/White
Pin 4 - Blue
Pin 5 - Blue/White
Pin 6 - Green
Pin 7 - Brown/White
Pin 8 - Brown


End 2 : T568B

Pin 1 - Green/White
Pin 2 - Green
Pin 3 - Orange/White
Pin 4 - Blue
Pin 5 - Blue/White
Pin 6 - Orange
Pin 7 - Brown/White
Pin 8 - Brown

Pins 1 and 2 are Tx (Transmit), while Pins 3 and 6 are Rx (Recieve) - So make sure Pin1 connects to Pin3, and Pin2 connects to Pin6. Don't just use any old colour either - the reason for the colours being in the order they are, is that the colours match the twisted pairs inside the UTP cable. (the twists are there deliberately to cancel out crosstalk)

Be careful when crimping the ends - Make sure there's only just enough of the jacket stripped for the wires to firmly make contact with the RJ45 pins - too little and there'll be no connection... too much, and your cable will suffer from excessive Crosstalk (NEXT).

If initially you strip off too much of the jacket, you can trim the wires with a pair of scissors, use the the RJ45 plug as a guide to the length you'll need

See here for more info http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/TIA/EIA-568-B
and here http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ethernet_crossover_cable

0

i think he wants to know how to make his own crossover cable using a crimping tool etc

how i'll setup my home network between two or three pcs.

0

how i'll setup my home network between two or three pcs.

Be careful - a single ethernet cable isn't going to be able to network more than 2 computers. For 3, you'll need a router/switch, and in that case, you should be using straight-through ethernet cables instead of crossover cables. To do a straight-through cable, you simply use the same order of wires on both ends, although some routers automatically detect which kind of wire you're using, and then it doesn't matter whether you use crossover cables or straight-through cables.

I'd suggest a Linksys wireless G router if you're planning to network computers, because then you have the option of going wireless later on. If not, then just go with a regular Linksys wired router. Whatever you do, don't get a D-Link (they're OK, but there's a lot of things Linksys has an advantage over D-Link, eg open firmware).

Hope this helps

This topic has been dead for over six months. Start a new discussion instead.
Have something to contribute to this discussion? Please be thoughtful, detailed and courteous, and be sure to adhere to our posting rules.