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Hi.

Has anyone maybe found this miraculous software. That I could install on Windows/Linux machine (server) and client on my own computer let it be Windows/Linux.

And have really great response time and quality? The server would be at 100Mbps, my connection would be at around 50Mbps. If my machine can run 10x YouTube video of 1080p 6FPS, why couldn't I get such response from my dedicated server?

I would like to use such a server for rendering, or compiling of huge chunk of code (everybody his/her own part, 516 people). Something that I could use to send clicks to the server, give it data, make it render, and play with high quality?

How long do you have? Or how long have you been around?

The X system did that, what about 2 decades ago. Linux in many forms uses it and as to the second part of the question, you need to consider all Gigabit LAN to hit your speed marks.

That said, Ntrigue was snapped up by Citrix in 1998 so Citrix is next to look at. Not that you'll get your speed on a 100 megabit LAN though.

How long do you have? Or how long have you been around?

Not so long.

The X system did that,

The "X System" is nowhere to be found except "X Window System, X11, X-Windows", unless the "X" is a wildcard-like feature or/and you're refering to the mentioned program.

what about 2 decades ago.

In 1995 they will able to stream audiovisual 2.5MB of data per second?

you need to consider all Gigabit LAN to hit your speed marks.

Uh, this chunk can be interpreted twice, either I need to expect that Gigabit (not related to actual Gb) LAN will hit my speed mark. Or, that in imaginative terms it is not possible to achieve it, because my network speed doesn't meet requirements.

That said, Ntrigue was snapped up by Citrix in 1998 so Citrix is next to look at.

GoToMyPC seems to be one I'm searching for.

Not that you'll get your speed on a 100 megabit LAN though.

Day 244, I still don't know why I have enough bandwidth for couple HD 60FPS videos streamed to me from YouTube, but can't get enough speed for just singular stream.

Let's tackle this one. " I have enough bandwidth for couple HD 60FPS videos streamed to me from YouTube, but can't get enough speed for just singular stream."

That works since the video is encoded and ready for sending a highly compressed stream. So even a 10 megabit can work at 1080p 60FPS.

To achieve this on a real time link and lower the network speed the image would have to be compressed and then sent. The CPU overhead for this would show up as LAG and again put you right back to asking why.

I don't know what you know about how these things work. Most is on the web and for me to cover it all I would want to do a whiteboard presentation and some realtime seminar. But let's say that to push a screen across is not the same as pushing Netflix streams. I can see where folk that don't know how things work could confuse these 2 systems.

That said many systems like VNC and Gotomypc use a system like this. Mind you this is just for discussion and not really how it works.

When VNC starts up it sends over the entire screen which is a bit of work. But after that it only sends over the parts of the screen that changed. For WIMP work (Windows Icon Mouse Pointer) that is going to be just fine but play a movie and the entire screen is changing and we're back to the original problems of bandwidth. I haven't seen any real time screen system that gets around the CPU encoding time issue. Have you?

I've done this and the lesson I learned is to get a bigger boat (uh, 1Gb LAN.)

Comments
Good to know.

To achieve this on a real time link and lower the network speed the image would have to be compressed and then sent. The CPU overhead for this would show up as LAG and again put you right back to asking why.

:o David Cooperfield, is that you? Yea, I ask why, when I will use powerful PC, why can't it be compressed? I get it, but 4x Nvidia 980, and 24-cores in two server CPUs wouldn't be enough to compress it and send it to moi?

But let's say that to push a screen across is not the same as pushing Netflix streams. I can see where folk that don't know how things work could confuse these 2 systems.

I also don't get why I does loading GIF take so long xD. But then again, GZIP compression. 5 seconds x 40kB each image (or way way less) x 60 frames = 12 000 kilobytes = 12MBs, nevermind, I thought I had a point, apparently it turned out to be bull xD

I also didn't cover why Netflix and buffering is so important. Streaming video is also leveraging any quiet time in the video action. So when the screen isn't changing much there is an opportunity for fill the buffer into the future so when there's a lot going on it eats from the buffer.

No if this is a 1080p screen we are duplicating across Ethernet we don't know the future so no buffer.

So let's see how much data is blasted over a 1080p HDMI link. That's worse case scenario which I think we get too deep. It's from 1 to 5 Gigabit. You can find prior tar pit discussions where folk try to sort the numbers like
http://arstechnica.com/civis/viewtopic.php?f=6&t=157257

Since any buffer would count as lag, almost no screen sending app (VNC, Gotomypc) do much buffering but do the old block method and send over a new block or GOP (google MPEG GOP if you are not up to speed) based on which block is the farthest out of sync. The effect is amazing to see if the bandwidth is too low. There are other tricks such as picking a color or pattern for a block and sending that over then catching up later with the real detailed block later and hope the human didn't notice.

So again you can see why 100 megabit is going to be risky for almost all realtime video feeds. Something's got to give.

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