I have a database working with VB6 and Jet. Everything works fine except that I now need the database to be accessed from a second machine on the network.

It appears that only one person can be connected at a time to the database using Jet, is this correct?

In the 'DefaultType' of the data method it has the option for Use ODBC, which, from my research, appears to be a more recent and flexible way to access databases. Is this what I need to use to get shared connections to the database?

Is so how do I use it? If I select it and run I get a 'Data source name too long' error.

Many thanks

More than one person can access it. Never done it with VB6 but its definately possible in .NET, just ensure that record locking is set correctly, and that the data connection is SHARE DENY NONE

There is an option for 'Exclusive' which I have set to false so I assume this is the same as your 'Share Deny None'

I can't find anything to suggest Record Locking. What does this do? Does it lock the database whilst you are making changes then release it to others after you have made an edit?

Any idea where this is in VB6?

Many thanks for the help.

nah record locking is actually set within MS access itself under DB properties

and yeah it does, theres different types, e.g lock whole database, lock whole table, lock whole row, or lock whole field, or none (bad)

I think it may be this:

ReadOnly = False or True

If, when compiling the program, I set it to False then I can Write a new record and read etc. But I cant backup the database as it's in use. If I set this to True then I can read data using my program and backup the database but I cant create new records.

So I though I could change this at runtime using Data1.ReadOnly = False when creating a new record then setting it back to True when saved. However I can't seem to change this value at runtime.

Why on earth cant I change this value at runtime???

Do I have to disconnect from the database before I can change the ReadOnly from False to True?

Is that where I am going wrong? If so how?

Many thanks for any help.

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