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Hi guys.

was just admitted to 2 faculties in McGill university, Montreal.
I'm alittle confused as for which one to choose though. the B.Sc (offered by the school of computer science) seemes to be more practical and more "hands on" programming.
the one offered by the Engineering faculty though is a "proffesional engineer" degree, but seems to have all of these engineering courses... it's less of software, alittle bit of everything...

i'm just confused for what to choose.
will this really make a difference out in the job market (in Software development field)?

any help would be very apreciated

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Last Post by yaeli_17
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Hi,

If you think you can handle the calculus, physics, and all the other curriculum elements, definitely go with engineering (I am a Bs. (Bachelor of Science) in Computer engineering doing Ms.) it makes a difference everywhere. For practicality and hands on experience IT is always a self-study area, in both programs it is up to you to keep up with new technologies, solutions and languages. No university teach squad about real life professional software development.

Loren Soth

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Thanks for your reply.

Eventually i went with B.Sc before reading it :-|
i think it'll be all good though. i'm gonna give it my best first year, get to talk to people alittle bit and maximum- chance for second year. don't have any problems with calculus or math. but i'm ailttle bit concerned because i have no programming knowledge what-so-ever, and i mean zip. I take it most of the students that choose this major usually have some type of programming experience.
I hope the courses teach the very basics and don't just assume you know it.

mind if i ask you how did you find your bachlors ? i just can't imagine myself graduating and having a good solid knowledge of programming, cause ... there's just so much to know. but i guess they just give you the tools to start with. the rest - like you said, is up to you.
did you go for masters straight after?

thanks again
Yael

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Hi,

I went for master degree right after because of local regulations and to avoid some other things. The classmates I graduated with scaled in terms of knowledge/experience from "just what school had given", to semi-pro IT staff level. It all depends on the enthusiasm and self-study of the trendy tools, technologies, languages, platforms, solutions.
Do not confine your self to subjects (languages, platforms, OS, tech) studied at university and personally practice a lot. The more mistake you make, lesser you will do next time; practice makes perfect. Wikipedia is a grate source of knowledge for all your needs and when you got stuck with a specific problem just google it (you aren't the first one to tackle to it most likely) even the most obscure questions have answers on google.

Loren Soth

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don't have any problems with calculus or math.

That's great news.

but i'm ailttle bit concerned because i have no programming knowledge what-so-ever, and i mean zip.

That doesn't matter. You might surpass these students who have 'programming knowledge' quickly. What separates students in computer science programs isn't how much preexisting knowledge they have; it's their creativity and ability for abstract logical thinking. Either you'll 'get it', or you won't. Some people will die when they introduce recursion. Others will die when they introduce pointers (but McGill uses Java in the intro course, so never mind). Others will die on exposure to more theoretical classes. You might not know what I'm talking about right now, but you'll see.

just can't imagine myself graduating and having a good solid knowledge of programming, cause ... there's just so much to know.

The main thing that you will need to learn (if you haven't already) is applied thinking. Comp sci (and mathematics too) requires exactly that. Good programmers don't get good from knowledge.

And don't worry about your prospects in the job market. You're going to McGill, for crying out loud. [edit: well, worry, but don't lose sleep.]

I don't know what gives me this feeling about you from reading only two short posts of yours, but I think you will do better than more than half your classmates. You'll be fine.

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Thanks for your replies.

you gave me a wider idea of what the program is really about, and i feel a hugeee relief :)

i'll sure keep in mind to practice alot though..

thanks again,

Yael

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