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Apple appears to be having battery issues again - it is reportedly asking iPhone 3Gs users to get in touch if their batteries are running down.

This tells us a number of things. First, that there is a real problem. When a business the size of Apple decides to ask its customers what the problem is, there is definitely something up. Second, Apple has been caught out by this. Nobody was expecting it and it looks as though they can't duplicate the problem in the labs - otherwise why ask the customers?

One possible theory to account for why this has happened is that Apple has actually allowed its biggest selling point to overrun its best selling products: there are simply too many apps for the company to be able to manage how an iPhone does. What does the product actually do, for example? It's a phone, it's a GPS, it's a games console - it actually depends entirely on what you happen to have installed on it. And unlike previous generations of phones with a bit of gaming, bit of music and bit of other stuff, the extras are at the heart of the iPhone and its competitors, which actually do more stuff than my first computer did 16 years ago. If Apple has no control over people's usage of their device and the demands they make of it I'm not surprised power is an issue.

But then, when I had my first iPhone 15 months ago, before they started upgrading the OS, the power didn't last a full 24 hours without a recharge. I now carry it with a battery pack case the whole time, just in case. And it's not a 3Gs, it's an ordinary 3G.

Call me cynical, but it's just possible this has been a bit of a design niggle for longer than Apple wants to tell us.

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Last Post by GuyClapperton
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1. Too easy 2. Too replaceable without spending money on an Apple engineer 3. Too cynical, I must stop saying these things.

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