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Is it possible to add fan slots to a case? The case in questions would either be the Silverstone Temjin TJ-06 or the Antec Super Lanboy. Thanks for the help. If it is possible please include a link or instructions, thanks for the help.

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Last Post by rogue-monkey
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What do you mean by 'fan slots'?

Do you mean adding holes and extra mounting points for additional case fans?

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You should start by ensuring that ALL case fan mounting points have clean holes for best airflow. If your case has mounting points which are a 'grille' or have numerous small holes for the air to blow through, cut the whole centre of it out to allow full airflow.

Adding extra fanholes is rather easily done too. The best additions to make, in order of preference, are a side panel mounting point to fit an intake fan which blows air directly onto the processor/display card area, and a top panel exhaust 'blowhole'.

Here's a guide:

http://www.moddershq.net/guides.asp?guideid=1

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You should start by ensuring that ALL case fan mounting points have clean holes for best airflow. If your case has mounting points which are a 'grille' or have numerous small holes for the air to blow through, cut the whole centre of it out to allow full airflow.

Adding extra fanholes is rather easily done too. The best additions to make, in order of preference, are a side panel mounting point to fit an intake fan which blows air directly onto the processor/display card area, and a top panel exhaust 'blowhole'.

Here's a guide:

http://www.moddershq.net/guides.asp?guideid=1

Thanks for the link, it was very informative. Could you suggest a good place to find out more information about a side intake fan? Also I had 2 questions, I found a good water cooing system for $90. Could it be used in conjunction with the case fans? As in, both working at the same time? Also, could you recommend a good link for finding out about adding a side fanhole, or is that process very similar to the top "blowhole". Thanks for the help.

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The process of adding a side panel fan is basically identical to that of addind a top panel exhaust. Just attach the fan the other way around, to ensure it is blowing air IN rather than drawing it out. (Still on the inside of the panel, of course, and simply reversed!)


I would not recommend watercooling units to newcomers. The benefits of watercooling kits are minimal, in my view, and some of them even provide less extra cooling potential than high-end, 3rd party heatsink/fan replacement units!

Might I ask what your system specifications are, and what temperature levels it currently runs at for processor and internal case temp?

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2.2 ghz 1mb cache 3400+ AMD athalon
Super Lanboy (probably)
6800GT 256mb
500 wattt PSU
K8N, K8N-E Deluxe, or DFI LANPARTY
1 gig 3200 DDR ram, 1 stick
160 gig 7200 RPM Hard drive, IDE interface
DVD/CD burner

That is the setup I WILL buy, havn't purchased it yet, still proofing. The water cooling system would be the http://www.case-mod.com/store/product_info.php?products_id=857 It got great reviews, and seems like an easy one to install. I am planning to OC the CPU to 2.4 ghz after I make sure the system is stable, and so I will need some good cooling, as both the graphics card and the CPU will generate buckets of heat. Do you know if case fans are still used in a water cooling system?
Thanks for the help. ;)

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That sounds like an OK system to me.

I wouldn't be planning on a watercooling setup straight off though. I'd be seeing how it goes before making that move.

In my opinion, if a processor won't do a couple of hundred magahurtz above specifications without either increasing core voltage or experiencing any appreciable rise in core temperature, then that processor isn't suitable for running overclocked on a long term basis.

It's a myth to consider that all instances of a particular processor have similar poential for overclocking. Every chip has its own unique potential. And the 'worthy' ones, in my view, should take a bit of a bump straight out of the box, without noticing the difference much at all!

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Good points, I am going to increase the core voltage for an oc of 200mhz. I will ease my way up, depending on the quality of the CPU as well. Before any of that I will also add another 120mm blowhole to the top, and 2 120mm intake fans to the side. Depending on my temperatures I will either go for a better heatsink fan, or if I really need it a water cooling system. Sound like a good plan? The reason I don't want to upgrade my stock heatsink right away is that I might still need water cooling, so I would essentially be throwing away 20-50 bucks. Thanks for the help, any comments?

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See how it runs before deciding on changes to be made is my suggestion.

What you have planned sounds a lot like overkill to me, unless you're gonna operate that PC in a very hot environment ;)

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See how it runs before deciding on changes to be made is my suggestion.

Ok thanks for all the help. Just to clarify, did you mean see how it runs before adding the additional fans, or the water cooling system/heatsink. Finally, what do you think I should increase the voltage to, for stable performance from the 2.2ghz 1mb cache model running at 2.4 ghz? If the chip can handle the OC, that is. Thanks again.

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I mean see how it runs before cutting holes in your case, and most definitely see how it runs before installing a water cooling setup.

And I'd also suggest that you DON'T increase core voltage for that processor at all. Not initially anyway. Although a lot of overclocking sites suggest that increasing voltage is something you do from the outset, I believe that's rather stupid advice!

Increasing core voltage is the most risky part of overclocking, and the step which is most likely to raise component temperatures. If you can get a stable overclock WITHOUT raising voltage levels, then that's the way to go. Increasing voltage is a LAST resort, not an initial move ;)

When you increase voltage levels, you also increase component failure risk. Keeping it cool with extreme cooling options won't guarantee you protection against that possibility. Only push a processor hard if you accept from the outset that you might have to throw it in the bin someday soon! May not happen, of course, but it CAN.

My own current 'beast' is an Athlon XP system. A 2500+ processor running at 3200+. No voltage increase, not temperature increase. With an AeroJet 7+ fitted to it, the thing idles at around 30C through most of the year, and only reaches the low 40s in the hottest of summer days. It will run at 2400MHz (3400+) without much heat increase, and with only a tiny amount of voltage increase. The chip is a proven performer, water-cooled and with core voltage increased, at 2800MHz. Why the hell do that? It's quite adequate at current settings, and it's not being overly stressed. There's a damned good chance it's gonna last a long time.

The point is, the processor was purchased secondhand, and hand-picked for the job it was intended to do. I'd only push one to its limits if it was purchased with the intention of blowing the damned thing up :D

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Point taken. I would like to not have to increase the voltage, but that might be needed for a 200mhz jump, depending on the stability of the CPU. Do you agree that a good heatsink/fan and the included two 120mm case fans would be sufficient fo keep an AMD 64 running resonably cool at 2.4ghz? (up from 2.2ghz) Thanks for the advice.

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You're going to have to decide that after you have the thing running for a while, and monitor it closely. Every chip is different, despite what other people may suggest. Chips from different productions runs are better or worse than others. Within a single production run chips can vary. Even chips from the same silicone wafer vary in quality. Chips from the centre of a wafer, for example, are usually 'better' than chips from near the edge of the wafer.

Try it out, assess the thing, then make your decisions.

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Ok thanks again for all the help, this is what I am going to do.
1) Get Super Lanboy, install parts and make sure everything is running stable (benchmarks) using stock heatsink/fan.
2) Gradually overclock until I have reached 2.4 ghz on my 1mb levl 2 cache 3400+
3) Test idle temp/stability, make changes if needed
4) Run Aquamark and 3dmark, test stability.
5) Depending on temp levels either, in order of least cooling performance and lowest cost: 1) install 2 intake 120mm fans on side, one 120mm top blowhole 2) High quality 3rd party heatsink/fan 3) Kingwin AWC-1 water cooling system. One last question, estimating, by how many degrees do you think each system will lower the temp of CPU and other core parts over the 2 included 120mm fans and stock fan/heatsink?
I really appreciate all the help Catweazle, by the way! ;)

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