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Ok, I have an Intel(R) 82845G/GL/GE/PE/GV Graphics Controller. 64 mb ram. 52mb AGP. It says it is integrated... I am using a SiSoftware Sandra program to look at this.

First off, I would like to know if there are anywayz to make this better while I still have it? If not, when I buy a new one, is there anything specific I need to buy? And will I have to buy a new mother board also?


Please, If anyone would research this and tell me, I would appreciate it MUCH!

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Last Post by caperjack
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Ok, I have an Intel(R) 82845G/GL/GE/PE/GV Graphics Controller. 64 mb ram. 52mb AGP. It says it is integrated... I am using a SiSoftware Sandra program to look at this.

First off, I would like to know if there are anywayz to make this better while I still have it? If not, when I buy a new one, is there anything specific I need to buy? And will I have to buy a new mother board also?


Please, If anyone would research this and tell me, I would appreciate it MUCH!

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Ok, I have an Intel(R) 82845G/GL/GE/PE/GV Graphics Controller. 64 mb ram. 52mb AGP. It says it is integrated... I am using a SiSoftware Sandra program to look at this.

First off, I would like to know if there are anywayz to make this better while I still have it? If not, when I buy a new one, is there anything specific I need to buy? And will I have to buy a new mother board also?


Please, If anyone would research this and tell me, I would appreciate it MUCH!

Intergrated means its built into the motherboard ,so to make it better you would need to buy a new video card ,either a PCI or AGP depends on if your board has a AGP slot or not ,you would have to disable the unboard and instllal the new card .

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Well, i have the same video integrated system, only that it is on a laptop, so I cannot change it.
But in the graphics controller program I found that the card uses from 8 to 64 Mb of memory and it also shows what amount it uses when I check. So i spent some time trying to get higher than 20 Mb values for this (games) and it just cannot seem to be able to go higher, and the games i am playing don't go smooth.
For example I can only play Nfs underground 2 in 800x600 and low graphic settings, and my card uses 22 Mb of the Ram from its 256Mb, and with a P4 2,3Ghz.
I don't know if it is normal or not so that's why i am asking u guys :), maybe some kind of tweak utility which forces the video card to be fully operational, but I couldn't find it yet.
Thanks in advance, hope to hear from u soon.

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integrated graphics needs more system ram! A minimum of 512! If you are stuck with a laptop with integrated graphics you shouldnt be expecting to play games like NFS 2 either, no offense, they are just not made to do that. The reason it most likely doenst use 64 megs ram is because you do not have enough available for your system as it shares it from the 256. I have a laptop too with intel extreme graphics, with 640 megs ram, games play smooth, but not games like NFS2. If you want to do this i suggest getting a new machine as integrated graphics is for cheap, buisness/word processing/internet computers. All this in my opinion too...

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The intergrated intel extremes SUCK, just get a new graphics card! I have it and then bought a 9600xt, the change was GREAT! To disable the onboard graphics goto the device manager and disaable there, the turn off your comp, insert new GFX card and boot up and install drivers, my card was only£40 and the change was huge!

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I have a Dell Dimension 3000 running a P4 2.8, 512mb of ram, and an Intel integrated 82865G. It uses 64mb, but since it is integrated, I was wondering if there is a way to use system ram as graphics memory.


Thanks in advance! :)

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as a matter affact it already is using system ram for graphics! Intel integrated graphics means it uses up to 64 mb of system ram to run dedicated for graphics purposes...graphics cards have their own seperate ram that runs much faster than system ram, as well as their own processor dedicated for graphics...On a tangent, you, however, can not increase this amount of ram dedicated to graphics when using integrated graphics either.

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I have a Dell Dimension 3000 Pentium 4 with a integrated 64mb card. I want to know HOW to turn it off in BIOS so that I can put a new video card in the computer. I looked around in BIOS but not sure what to do in there. Please help.

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Sounds quite similar to what I was faced with and am doing now, though if this was in EARLY 2004, my PC is still not as new as I'd hoped. I just don't know what logic is involved in this Extreme Graphics chipset if it's anything BUT extreme! I have the same chipset listed in my Presario 1220 desktop! It lists a min of 8, a max of 64, but using DirectX 9.0, which is what current games are using, that's good. My Celeron D is 2.93 GHz, the RAM card PC2700 is 512K at the moment. Since the BIOS here only lists Priority set to PCI versus integrated option, it looks like you can install it right away without adjusting anything prior.
I was told there could be problems so I await more advice to avoid it not working out as planned. I seek more advice ASAP.
I pray the ATI Radeon 9250 is DirectX 9.0c capable and works with GUN, the new Western themed Activision game I bought. I was just reading that 4 rendering pipelines is half what new cards priced up to $200 offer. I didn't see much of that locally in stores!
BILL

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BILL S, you've talked about a very similar subject in two different places, making it hard to respond to your concerns.

You say that you have a 9250 and are disappointed by its performance. You also say that you looked around and it had the highest "numbers", so it should have been the best. This is a good lesson time. Higher numbers does not mean faster performance. Higher model numbers when comparing products from different manufacturers will never give you a good comparison. More and more, comparing model numbers between cards made by the same manufacuturer doesn't give you a means to compare performance.

The 9250 is an older card and was developed to be a low-end graphics solution. In essence, it was developed to be used as a graphics solution for offices and productivity software users that don't work with demanding multimedia applications.

The fact that a card has a DVI output doesn't mean that it is created for performing advanced rendering; it simply means that the card can output a true DVI signal for use on better LCD monitors and other displays that support DVI inputs.

If you truely want to find out what a card is made to do and what you can expect out of it, find sites that benchmark cards and see what they say about the card you want to get. In other words, do your homework. It's sad that you can't just look at a model number and know exactly what to expect from a card, but this is the state of computer components now.

In order for a card to be able to list DirectX 9.0 compatibility, all it has to do is be able to support all the instructions from the DirectX 9.0 instruction set. It doesn't have to be able to execute those instructions well in order for it to get the honor. So it may be able to execute all the instructions, but it doesn't make any promises that it will do it in a timely enough manner to make games playable.

Now... On to your system specs. You indicate that you have a Celeron D 2.93GHz processor, 512MB (I certainly hope that you meant MB rather than KB) of PC2700 (or DDR333) RAM, and have integrated graphics. You want to know how to make this machine powerful enough to play the latest games. To be frank, that's going to be hard considering that, after looking at your basic setup, it's apparent that this machine was designed to be a budget productivity machine, not a gaming machine. To start with, your motherboard is going to show its age fast in that it won't support the latest graphics cards because it doesn't have a PCI-Ex16 slot and that it doesn't have a fast bus. Your CPU is a Celeron. Think of Celeron as being short for "not as good as a Pentium", and you wouldn't be too far off base considering that Celeron is basically a Pentium with some of the expensive components reduced to make a budget chip. You have 512MB of RAM, which I consider to be a bare minimum amount of RAM to have now-a-days. I recommend no less than 1GB of RAM for any computer user, gamer or otherwise, since the RAM demands will continue to increase in the months and years to come. Furthermore, your RAM is DDR333, which, for an Intel system, is well behind the top speeds Intel systems are capable of now.

MyAdvice:

  1. This is the most important advice I can give... If you want to play games but have a limited budget (don't we all?), don't make the mistake of thinking, "I'll buy this machine that I can afford because I can always upgrade it later". It used to be true that you could do that, but it is no longer the case. If you truely upgraded an older productivity machine to be a gaming machine, you would end up spending so much money, you might as well have just built or purchased an entirely new machine. So, if you want to play the latest and greatest games, shell out the money for a gaming machine to begin with. If you can't afford to buy a gaming machine, then maybe you'll have to settle for not playing the latest games.
  2. Do your homework. Make sure that you fully understand what a component's designed use is and what it is capable of before purchasing it, or you will end up throwing money away.
  3. Don't get caught on marketing hype. Words like EXTREME, Advanced Performance, Enhanced, [insert additional marketing words here] don't mean anything. They are used to make people think it is something newer and faster.
  4. Machines with built-in graphics cards will never be considered gaming machines. If they ever manage to make a machine with an integrated solution that can play the latest games, it won't be able to keep up for long.
  5. Don't try to get a "gaming laptop"; rather, make a decision between a gaming machine or a laptop. Gaming laptops cost a fortune and will have to be replaced annually in order to keep up with the latest games.
  6. Who really cares if you can run the latest game with the highest settings? If you do, you have to ask yourself if it is worth throwing a minimum of $1000 at your machine every year in order to keep it current.

</rant>

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well....i just ordered a new graphics card for my Dell Dimension 3000 P4...so is there any way to turn off the integrated graphics card in BIOS??

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Hi, Chris
I know I'm quite anxious to get some info on this as I've been told a few things while out shopping of course, some maybe hype or misinformation, etc.
I found one review, I think, on Yahoo that points out the series numbers inaccuracies and that the 9250 may not be a good route to go, mine is opened but not installed yet, but I did purchase it last week. I can't find many PCI cards that are game worthy on store shelves here, and my eBay searches didn't bode well either

BILL

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well....i just ordered a new graphics card for my Dell Dimension 3000 P4...so is there any way to turn off the integrated graphics card in BIOS??

Which ever card you bought, check their site, for mine, Xtasy had a FAQ for things like that, each BIOS is laid out a bit different, but there are three areas I read that need to be addressed when switching the video handling chores, one is letting Windows know, as it's seperate from the hardware end.
-BILL

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NEVER EVER BUY A PC WITH AN INTEGRATED GFX CARD. THEY SUCK.

They can barely run quake 2

If you note, Intel's Extreme Graphics is virtually anything but, BUT it appears new PC's are upping the anti and the main key is that there will still be a slot for adding a card. The price prohibited need something that will let you run most games, HOPEFULLY, but as I found first hand, budget PC's can't hold a candle to simple console games that I think should have paved the way for new PCs to incorporate both 3D accelerated gaming and video along with typical PC's power for more boring apps
-B

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intel extreme cards are designed for office use and for people that dont play games or are graphics card intensive. intel extreme and other intergrated graphics are designed just to produce an image to the screen, nothing too fancy. if you like to play games and you have intergrated then buy a dedicated graphics card with dedicated video memory that doesnt leech off your ram.

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I know this is an old thread, but the fact that Intel graphics sucks doesn't go away. Why can't this company make anything but crap video hardware? Why do they call it "Extreme Graphics"? There is nothing even vaguely extreme about it unless you include my frustration.

I've got a Lenovo laptop with Intel Extreme, so there's nothing I can do about it. I'm not interested in games, but I have it hooked up to an Acer 20" LCD monitor. There is about 1" black bar at the right side of the screen. If I try to adjust the monitor to fill up the screen, the picture jumps to the right and then the screen is half black. That's that, so I just have to live with it. Changing modes doesn't help, only makes it worse.

This monitor works fine with anything else I've tried, so obviously the Intel graphics is putting out garbage timings.

So why is it asking too much for the biggest chipmaker on the planet to perform a straightforward job like throwing stuff at the screen? This is nothing new, it's been going on for years. I've never seen a piece of Intel graphics hardware that was even adequate, never mind good.

AMD has upped the ante by buying ATI. I don't know if that's a good idea, because I've been dirty on ATI for a long time, not because their video cards are no good (although I had one fail completely after only a week of service), it's because they force you to download 100 megabytes or more of crap when all you want is 1 megabyte driver. And you have to do this for each and every model. I was mightily impressed with nVidia's Unified Driver idea, where you only download one driver and it works for all their products.

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I'm disappointed with the post in this topic, while
Intel extreme is anything but extreme in gaming.
it wasn't designed for gaming
but to say its only good for office apps and internet just isn't justified
this chipset was designed for basic multimedia
(dvd avi mpeg) with this in mind i set out to determine the base cause of games being unable to run on this chipset
it basically came down to one thing
H/W transform&lighting support
a basic instruction set used since before 2004
most games require direct support or wont run
some games use less restrictive
min. system requirements
game that i can run
I have a Toshiba satellite p105 s6004
specs as follow
intel molibl centino 1.92 GHz
1024 MB pc3400
windows xp sp2
intel 945 express family w/ 128Mb
blaa blaa blaa

anyway I've ran starwars battle front 2 run well
but very slow load times
unreal turny 2004 plays very well
need for speed most wanted & below
and a surprise for me but the newest nfs out
will also play using min requirements

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you dont need to but a new mother board.. but all u have to do is that , if you wanna buy a new graphics controller.. you should buy one of nvidia, i think the new cards from them do support the dx10 and it will add a new graphic feature to your pc

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I have a Dell Dimension 3000 Pentium 4 with a integrated 64mb card. I want to know HOW to turn it off in BIOS so that I can put a new video card in the computer. I looked around in BIOS but not sure what to do in there. Please help.

in my dimension 5150 i go into the BIOS then into "Integrated Peripherals" then "graphics" and i set "mode" to "auto/PEG" . This means it will use the pci-express addin graphics card if it is present

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I don't play ANY games, I'm just talking about everyday stuff like websurfing and watching video clips.

The monitor's native resolution is 1280x1024, but if I try to use it, I get the black bar on the right. As the temperature goes up, the picture suddenly jumps to the right and the left 1/3 of the screen is black.

I know this is partly an issue with the Acer AL1912 monitor, which I never would have bought if I knew this was going to happen. But the monitor works fine with everything else I've tried it with.

I've been forced to switch to 1024x768, which still exhibits the problem, but not as bad. And this is all because the Intel graphics chip is putting out spurious timings for whatever reason. I can see vertical lines at the edge of the screen that shouldn't be there. They are confusing the monitor, so it can't find the proper sync pulses.

This is a laptop, so there aren't any other graphics options, I'm stuck with the Intel crap. What can I do? Is there some sort of filter I can put between the VGA output and the monitor that will clean up the sync timings?

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I have an intel 965 express chipset family which i think is proper shit, but i have 3gb RAM which compared to 64mb looks pretty good, i have a medion akoya e5211 laptop. can i increase the performance because i am playing halo CE PC on my laptop but it is choppy in the level i am playing. But i also have a computer with nvidia geforce 9500 gt with 512 mb ram which is better?

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Do you have the latest drivers downloaded? Is it a G 965, P 965 or a Q 965 chipset?

Edited by jingda: n/a

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