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I am problem with my pc.So,help me from get out this problem.My problem is I buy a new prossesor But I can't run in my computer with my old motherboard.Can you tell me what motherboard i need.My prossesor is:Intel (M) (C)'06 E5300,PENTIUM(R) DUAL-CORE,SLB9U MALAY,2.60GHz/2M/800/06,Q914A9 19 (e4).So Tell me as soon as possible. Help Me.Please Tell Me Whom Motherboard i need? It's my question and problem. Please Tell ME. My contact Number is 01712944814. and my e-mail is tawhidmahmmu@gmail.com.

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Last Post by normanw40
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Go to Intel website and search for "slb9u".

SLB9U specs
Looking at "Sockets supported", one sees "LGA775".

Look for motherboards that have "LGA775" processor socket.

Other things that you may need to change include:

-Memory (see what memory motherboard supports)
-Power Supply (check power requirements of motherboard)
-Case (depends on form factor of motherboard--ATX, microATX, etc...)
-Keyboard (depends on motherboard)
-Hard drive (depends on motherboard connections--IDE/EIDE/PATA/SATA/SATA II/SATA III)
-CD/DVD drive (depends on motherboard connections)
-Graphics card (depends if motherboard has onboard graphics)

In order to minimize cost, you may consider looking for a motherboard that works with some of the other hardware that you have.

Resources:
Difference between SATA I, SATA II and SATA III

Edited by cgeier

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These days, "upgrades" are not so much an option, and will cost more than replacing the system with a current model - planned obsolescence is the term I believe. Replacement will probably be cheaper, and better...

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I agree heartily with rubberman. All the components that go into a pc tend to be designed to work with a relatively small range of specifications designed around the processor (CPU).
I don't know what the chip cost you but changing other components could result in your spending much more money.

There are motherboards for a 775 socket that cost in the neighborhood of $70 US. If made a choice you would have to go to the manufacturer's website and verify that the motherboard has been verified for your CPU and other components such as memory and power supply etc. are the ones you currently have.

I suspect when you are done, you may be looking at much more money that you would like to spend.

Also, the resultant machine will lag behind personal computer designed in the last year or two. Many usable machines that are a year or two old will outperform and be more reliable than the one you are putting together. Remember, components do wear. Capacitors are a common failure point and of course hard drives are always an issue.

I'd recommend reselling your cpu and moving on. Transfer you data to a new machine. I think you will be better off.

Best,
Norm

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