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Hey,

I'm looking to dual boot Windows Xp and Linux Ubuntu...

I'm totally new to Linux and i want to test it out....

Could someone please link me to a how-to site or explain how to install one then the other...

Thanks a lot!

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Last Post by jbennet
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If I don't have windows installed yet...

Is there another way to install both?

The videos on the site start with Windows already installed...

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windows likes to be installed first. its picky

install windows first. EIther tell it to only use half the drive, or shrink the partition using the ubuntu livecd, and use the newly created space.

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if you install Linux first will will delete the drive or corrupt your linux installation UNLESS you have a separate partition to install windows. so follow Jbennet advise Windows first, then linux Ubuntu. This is a very nice operating system. I love it.

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>Whats the best way to start..

The best way to learn something quickly is to get out of your comfort zone. If you've set up Ubuntu and you're happily surfing the internet with a web browser, then you aren't learning much. If you really want to learn Ubuntu (or Linux for that matter), set goals for yourself. Perhaps for the first week you want to get familiar with some of the common Gnome applications. Then maybe the next week you want to learn how to use services in Linux. Experiment, tinker around, don't be afraid.

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Ok.....

So if your trying to learn about Ubuntu..

Whats the best way to start..

learn how to use the command line (control + alt + f2 to switch to it) (control + alt + f7 to go back to GUI) and learn common commands like "rm" "ls" "cp" "usermod" . Also try and learn how to compile stuff from src code and how to use a text editor from a command line e.g nano. IF your GUI dies, this will come in handy.

Speaking of that, if your GUI dies press control + alt + backspace to reset it.

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no problem

the command line can be very powerful. remember its case sensitve.

If your linux ever dies, in the grub menu choose failsafesafe/single user mode. loads only the core drivers, no gui and only the root user. Helps you fix problems.

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>Why would it do that?
Who knows? Files corrupt, internal settings change, operating systems will break down of their own accord. More often than not though, it's the user that breaks the operating system. For example, if you're trying to install drivers for your graphics card (so that you can use hardware acceleration), and something gets messed up.

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Well I am using the Minimum requirements for Ubuntu..
256mb Ram
8Gb Harddrive
...I just know that it is an older computer maybe 10 years

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Its just slow altogether..

I wish I could speed it up somehow.....without buying equipment for it..

Anyways....

Is there anything that is fun to do in Ubuntu...or something that could be entirely new to me?

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>Is there anything that is fun to do in Ubuntu...or something that could be entirely new to me?

If Gnome is too slow for you, I would recommend some lightweight alternatives such as Enlightenment , Xfce, IceWM, and Evilwm ( if your feeling adventurous).

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how much ram you got?

install your (restricted) video driver and use hdparm and a kernel more suited to your CPU - will speed up your PC

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I have 256mb of RAM....


I have another question...

Could you run Ubuntu as a Live CD to access files in the Windows c: drive.

For example lets say you have a virus in windows....

Could you use Ubuntu as a Live CD, go into the Hard drive and erase the virus?

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>Could you run Ubuntu as a Live CD to access files in the Windows c: drive.
Yep, the Ubuntu LiveCD includes NTFS filesystem drivers, among other things. If I remember correctly, your Windows volume should appear on your desktop when properly mounted.

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yeah its possible

256mb isnt enough

hell, 256mb runs xp slow and doesnt even run vista at all, how do you expect it to run a modern Linux OS?

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The funny things is that it is actually running Ubuntu ....slow...but it is running Ubuntu HAHA

What I'm trying to do is learn about Ubuntu....

and the only spare computer (That works) is the one with a maximum of 256mb memory...

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I'd recommend Xubuntu if you have a slower computer. Xfce is very similar to Gnome, so you likely won't experience much of a learning curve when using it. And Xfce uses way less of your computer resources.

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is Xubuntu like an upgrade... can I just make a CD and upgrade like when you Upgrade from XP Home to Professional

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If you've got an existing Ubuntu installation, you can install Xubuntu on top of it with

apt-get install xubuntu-desktop

And then in GDM or whatever login manager you use, choose an Xfce session before you log in.

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Umm Ha Ha...

I don't understand what you wrote there

apt-get install xubuntu-desktop

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