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Last Post by Chronister
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Well an .exe is an executable built for the windows environment, so getting it to run on any linux box isn't always possible.

However, there is some emulation software you can try. The most well known is Wine:

Wine is a program that offers a compatibility layer allowing Linux users to run some Windows-native applications inside of Linux. Wine is not the ideal. Ideally, you should find native Linux applications. You can use Ubuntu's software package manager to search for easily installable native Linux apps, or you can explore OSalt or Linux App Finder to find alternatives for specific Windows programs.

Not all Windows applications run in Wine. And some that do require extra configuration in order to work. You may want to consult the Wine HQ app database to see if the Windows application you're thinking of installing through Wine will work well with Wine or not. Platinum-rated applications will work with no extra configuration. The example on this page is a platinum-rated application.

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There may be another thought, I tried using wine but in the end decided a better way was to see if there is a linux program out there that will do the same thing as you are trying to do using the exe. So for example I gave up on MS Word and went over to OPEN office. In the longer term this has for me
been a better solution, more reliable, easier and more stable!
M

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I have the Longman Contemporary English Dictionary DVD on which one of the minimum system requirements have written to be Linux 5.0(I don't remember it precisely and I don't have access to the DVD at the moment because I have left in my dormitory room in another city) while I have Ubuntu 10.10 installed on my computer so the DVD was supposed to run correctly on my system but when I put it in the CDROM the computer even doesn't recognise that there's any thing there(This problem doesn't occur when I put other CD's or DVD's in the drive). So I thought maybe by changing some configurations that differ between older versions of Linux and mine I'll be able to install this software.

I have to mention that I'm pretty new to Linux and I don't have much information about it.(I asked about the ways to run .exe files because the DVD worked correctly on Windows.)

Thanks In Advance
Nooshin

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If the linux machine does not recognise one DVD it could be the CD itself (is it scratched etc) If the drive does recognise other CDs on hte linux machine (that is bought dvds) then it is likely to be the dictionary dvd.
If any other commercial DVD is not recognised then it is likely to be the drivers in linux for the dvd. I have had problems turning on CD audio for this reason and googling a blog should bring up the details;
M

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I've already browsed the Internet to find similar cases. All I found was that there are some ways to run similar Longman publications products on Ubuntu 9.* but none of them worked for Ubuntu 10.10. Could you provide some information on the basic differences in the constructs of Ubuntu 10 and Ubuntu 9?
Maybe this would solve the problem.

Thanks
Nooshin

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love top help on that one but can't. Normally all programs of a later number are able to cope with programs that run under an earlier number. Its called yupwa&rds compatability; In most cases it is true but where there are verry good reasons ie win 95 to win NT where the disk strucrture was changed for security reasons some progs wont run. I do not iknow if thi├žs is true for Ubuntu but >I doubt it;

Ther eis one point you may need to look up help on and that is that hard disk drives (and some CD / DVD drives actually- have differing formasd and it is the format that dictates if the operating system of the computer can read the disk. You nee more help that I can give sorry

M

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Wine is not the ideal. Ideally, you should find native Linux applications. You can use Ubuntu's software package manager to search for easily installable native Linux apps, or you can explore OSalt or Linux App Finder to find alternatives for specific Windows programs.

Edited by Dani: Plug snipped

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You can try running the program in WINE, but if it doesn't work I'm sure there is a replacement application available for the DVD you want to use. Try repairing the DVD first if Linux has no trouble running other DVDs.

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