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over the last few weeks ive tried out rh8, mdk 9.1, knoppix 3.1, gentoo, yoper, debian sarge, and j.a.m.d and by far...except for gentoo, j.a.m.d was the coolest in my opinion. its a slimmer version of rh8 recompiled for i686 cpus.
you all should try it...i like it alot. but i do admit i like gentoo...well purely cuz of the fact that i got it to work and im kinda shaky in the linux dept :P

anyways

http://www.boycottmicrosoft.net/jamd/

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Last Post by alc6379
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I've used slackware for 4 years and never once have I been disappointed. http://www.slackware.com

I agree. Hands down, favorite distro. I have used Debian, Redhat, Mandrake, (and those based upon those mentioned), and a few other "niche" distros, and by far, I must say taht Slackware is my favorite. I love the BSD-style init scripts, low overhead installer/configuration tools, and security, out of the box. Patches are as simple as '/sbin/upgradepkg' and the slackware "package tools" provide for easy package management. Each distro has their strong point(s), but IMHO slackware has the most.

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I prefer Slackware and FreeBSD. I still have (somewhere in this mess) the original Slackware 2 floppies, and I've been a Beastie since about 4.3. Why everone is so caught-up in Fedora is beyond me. (How many questions regarding Slack have you seen here? Compare that number to those using Fedora, and maybe that says something about Fedora?)

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I prefer Slackware and FreeBSD. I still have (somewhere in this mess) the original Slackware 2 floppies, and I've been a Beastie since about 4.3. Why everone is so caught-up in Fedora is beyond me. (How many questions regarding Slack have you seen here? Compare that number to those using Fedora, and maybe that says something about Fedora?)

There are some things I can say in reply to these points:

  • Slackware people tend to know Linux better than most users.
  • BSD people tend to know Linux better than most Linux users.
  • Newer users tend to gravitate towards more "user-friendly" distros like Fedora/Red Hat

In other words, you wouldn't normally be using Slackware or a BSD if you didn't know what you were doing. Most new people start off with a GUI-touchy-feely distro like Red Hat when starting off, so they will have more questions to begin with. I personally started off with Mandrake 7.1! I don't think there's anything wrong with Fedora, necessarily-- it's just that the people who have more questions are using Fedora as opposed to say, Slackware or Debian.

I'll come out and be honest, too, though-- I'm a HUGE slackware fan, but I don't run it currently. Right now, I've got Debian boxes, FreeBSD boxes, and NetBSD boxes.

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It's all about slackware my friend. I've used slackware for 4 years and never once have I been disappointed. http://www.slackware.com

Boo Yaw! Slackware user since 1995. Often immitated, never duplicated. :cheesy:


Oh yeah...and for those interested...package managing got a lot simpler than it already is. Try http://swaret.org/

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Boo Yaw! Slackware user since 1995. Often immitated, never duplicated. :cheesy:


Oh yeah...and for those interested...package managing got a lot simpler than it already is. Try http://swaret.org/

IMHO... Package management could have been simpler on Slackware. Even though the packages install nicely, there's absolutely no dependancy checking. That's one of the reason why I switched over to the *BSDs. If you like the BSD-style init scripts, why not go with where they originated from? It really helps that the BSD packages have some form of automated dependancy checking and retrieval.

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IMHO... Package management could have been simpler on Slackware. Even though the packages install nicely, there's absolutely no dependancy checking. That's one of the reason why I switched over to the *BSDs. If you like the BSD-style init scripts, why not go with where they originated from? It really helps that the BSD packages have some form of automated dependancy checking and retrieval.

Check out swaret.org....dependency check is now c/w.

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Check out swaret.org....dependency check is now c/w.

I'll be sure to do that, once I get my system back up and running. But, I can tell you, it's not going to pull me away from my *BSDs. I'm just too happy with ports and pkg_add -r. Besides, I like ipfw or ipf more than iptables for my firewalling needs.

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