-3

I just don't understand!

It is starting to become an annoyance, it makes daniweb more of a forum entirely devoted to Linux.

I'm tired of seeing #!/xxx/xxx/xxx at the start of every program.
On windows, you just type out a program. Run it. Done. The operating system does not intefere the slightest bit.
But with linux you need to put the #! line, then run it, then fail, then realise another stupid Linux rule
Yes, its chmod. It just gets in the way, I don't understand how Linux is good for programming.

Folks here say its good for programming but...It just isn't much help at all.
What makes it....good for programming? Or daily use? Or reliability?

Edited by HTMLperson5: Bad English/Grammar

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  • > It is starting to become an annoyance, it makes daniweb more of a forum entirely devoted to Linux. I try to be neutral as much as I can. When I give instructions to people on installing a particular library or development tool or being able to link to it, … Read More

  • You are some piece of work my friend, or shall I say "troll". > Actually, that line can refer to a programming language Right. And then you list 4 scripting languages. Bravo.. If I wanted to look stupid I could not have done better. > What, Shell Scripting? Remember this, … Read More

  • 3

    I use both Windows and Linux on a daily basis. Windows is a great GUI and Linux is a great server. Use the right tool for the job. You can drive a screw in with a hammer but it is not going to look pretty and may fail. A few … Read More

  • 1

    Did you run Ubuntu Server ? If not, comparing a server against a desktop is a little flawed. Read More

  • 1
    cereal 1,524   5 Years Ago

    In a distributed system you can do that but not in a single laptop, at least looking at the specs it is hardly possible: - [http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/windows/desktop/aa366778(v=vs.85).aspx#physical_memory_limits_windows_7](http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/windows/desktop/aa366778(v=vs.85).aspx#physical_memory_limits_windows_7) - http://h10010.www1.hp.com/wwpc/us/en/sm/WF06a/321957-321957-64295-3929941-3955552-5060880.html?dnr=1 > look like a fool :D Read More

0

There are quite a bit of Official Microsoft forums and sites such as technet, iis.net, aps.net, etc... So people that need MS support flock to those support forums.

I have been fairly active on this forum and do not consider myself linux, apache, mysql friendly. I tend to work with Windows, IIS, asp.net, etc...

But I see your point.

0

I tend to work with Windows, IIS, asp.net

asp. NET is not really my favorite technology on Windows to be honest (in other words I dont like it very much, I actually prefer PHP for windows).
There are down sides to Windows, but for Software Development I find it quick, easy - and sort of ideal.

0

Linux development and windows development both have their own nuances. IMHO, the operating system gets just as involved with ASP.NET as it does with any nix-based programming. That being said, the very vast majority of DaniWeb visitors are Windows folks ... and I have the analytics to prove it! :-P

0

the very vast majority of DaniWeb visitors are Windows folks

However, I do find many who encourage to install Linux. I am guessing those people are running Linux as well.

4

It is starting to become an annoyance, it makes daniweb more of a forum entirely devoted to Linux.

I try to be neutral as much as I can. When I give instructions to people on installing a particular library or development tool or being able to link to it, or if I give instructions about dynamic libraries (DLLs or shared-objects) or multi-threading, and so on, I always try to give both Linux and Windows instructions. The only problem I have is that usually the Linux instructions are really simple (like an apt-get command and an additional compiler flag) while the Windows instructions are lengthy explanations of configuration settings through menus and what files to put in what folders, and environment variables to set, and bla bla bla. It's not my fault if Linux comes across in a much better light from a programmer's point of view.

I wrote a set of instructions the other day for setting up file-sharing and a source-code repository on my work-group's server. The Linux-specific instructions were at most a few sentences and a couple of commands. The Windows-specific instructions were several pages with links on tutorials to setup this or that. That's just one example, but that's the situation I see all the time, for every mundane little thing you do.

I'm tired of seeing #!/xxx/xxx/xxx at the start of every program.

I guess you mean #!/bin/bash. Most people would call that a bash script, not a program. And, by the way, with Microsoft's new PowerShell (which is essentially a native Unix bash shell for Windows), you're going to be seeing a lot more bash-style scripting in Windows too. I don't know you, but it sounds like you do web-based / server-side coding (e.g., PHP, ASP.NET, etc.), I would expect that there would be a stronger proportion of Linux users and developers in those fields just from the vast predominance of Linux (or other Unix-variants) on server systems (more than 80%), that just comes with the territory.

I usually hang out on software development forums (C++, C, Delphi, CSc, Java, etc.), and that's definitely Windows-dominated as most people program on their home Windows PC. So, this might just be a matter of perception, from where you tend to hang out. From looking at your profile, your programming-related posts seem to be on Python, Javascript / DHTML / AJAX, Shell Scripting, Web-design (HTML / CSS), and PHP. Obviously, 3 of these are strongly biased towards Linux/Unix development (just by their user-base), and the other two are web-based. So, how could you expect not to feel a certain predominance of Linux while posting there.

On windows, you just type out a program. Run it. Done. The operating system does not intefere the slightest bit.

Just a thought... Maybe you're just happy that Windows "doesn't interfere", but some people might want more of their OS, like for it to "be helpful".

But with linux you need to put the #! line, then run it, then fail, then realise another stupid Linux rule
Yes, its chmod. It just gets in the way, I don't understand how Linux is good for programming.

Pointing out one little thing is not an argument. And, what you pointed out is an extremely insignificant thing (the #! line and having to ch-mod to executable on a new script file (which you technically don't have to, with $ sh my_script.sh in which my_script.sh doesn't have to be executable)). All OSes have little quirky things about them, but it's the global experience that matters.

Folks here say its good for programming but...It just isn't much help at all.
What makes it....good for programming? Or daily use? Or reliability?

I won't get into the "daily use" or "reliability" part, that has been discussed at lengths on this thread and all over the web.

I cannot give you a detailed argument for Linux being good for programming (and "programming" is too wide of an area to discuss). I can only tell you what my experience has been like. I programmed almost exclusively in Windows for maybe 9 years, most of which in C++, mostly doing amateur 3D computer games, numerical analysis and dynamics simulators for engineering applications. Every new library that I wanted to use was a real pain to setup correctly; I always found myself lacking tools that I needed (either because I wasn't willing to pay big bucks for some "professional" edition software, or because I found freeware tools to be limited or unreliable); debugging software distributed over several modules (DLLs) was a complete nightmare (one such bug took me 2 months to track down); and, my code folders were a mess due to all the IDE-bound build-systems that are traditional of Windows IDEs (like Visual Studio, C++Builder, or Code-Blocks) and the general mayhem they cause on a source-trunk. Of course, I wasn't an expert back-then, just an inexperienced kid, and probably, many of the problems I had might have been solved if I knew better. In any case, when I switched to Linux (because I had to) about 4 years ago, all those problems went away immediately, without exception and without "training". Everything was easy. The tight integration of modules makes debugging a piece of cake, the solid shell environments of Linux provide the basis for great management of source folders (and versioning control) and remote controlling multiple computers, the ease of installation and use of open-source libraries is phenomenal, not to mention all the great tools available for free. At least, this has been my experience (and I don't claim everyone's experience would be the same).

Today, I don't really have much choice anyways, I mostly program robot control / estimation software, multi-body dynamics simulations, and artificial intelligence, and in these fields, Linux is unavoidable, and preferred by most (including me). The libraries used in robotics (ROS, OpenCV, MaCI, CLARAty, and many more) are pretty much all Linux libraries with no official support for Windows (except maybe a note, saying: "We think the library should compile under Windows, try at your own expense, but we don't waste our time maintaining a running Windows version"), and that's pretty much the case for my library too. Most robots are controlled either by Linux, a micro-Linux version, or QNX (when hard real-time is needed, but QNX is essentially the same as Linux from a programmer's point-of-view), that is, if they even have an OS at all (most of them do, nowadays). At the robotics department I was last in, I don't think I ever saw a computer running Windows (the only sign of Windows was a Windows sticker quite adequately placed inside one of the toilet bowls in the restroom near my office).

So, whatever the reason is, it's probably not just one reason in particular, people working in my field (mostly engineers and computer scientists), who spend most of their time programming (that's the main thing you do in robotics), have clearly come to a collective consensus that Linux is the best environment to work in. Of course, in robotics, we don't need to cather to the masses (massive Windows user-base) because we don't deliver software products for your average Joe to run on his PC, and without that requirement, it seems most developers have naturally gravitated towards Linux. That tells a lot. It doesn't say "why" Linux is good for programming, it just tells you that many people agree that it is, from their personal experience with it. And, of course, that's just my field, it might not be universal.

-3

I guess you mean #!/bin/bash

Actually, that line can refer to a programming language, it does not have to be a bash script, for example - you could have:
#!/usr/bin/perl
or
#!/usr/bin/python
or
#!/usr/bin/ruby
or
#!/usr/bin/php
That line could vary, it is not limited to #!/bin/bash

Obviously, 3 of these are strongly biased towards Linux/Unix development (just by their user-base), and the other two are web-based

What, Shell Scripting? Remember this, Powershell is a form of Shell Scripting, and batch is also a form of shell scripting. You can't do either of these on Linux. And for Python too, there is the win32 package, which is not for Linux or Mac, the only one I agree with you on is PHP.

Just a thought... Maybe you're just happy that Windows "doesn't interfere", but some people might want more of their OS, like for it to "be helpful".

And how is that, very helpful?

I programmed almost exclusively in Windows for maybe 9 years, most of which in C++, mostly doing amateur 3D computer games

Game Development, haha, Windows for you :)
C++? Visual Studio for you, but wait! Your using Linux now, therefore you can't use the what you call helpful features of your operating system.

Every new library that I wanted to use was a real pain to setup correctly;

Maybe because I dont know C or C++, but for Python with Windows, all you need to do is move the module to Python32/27/26/25, but for Linux, it is no easier than trying to build a nuclear reactor in a darkened room with watch pieces using only your teeth.

I always try to give both Linux and Windows instructions. The only problem I have is that usually the Linux instructions are really simple (like an apt-get command and an additional compiler flag)

Let me tell you now, Windows with almost everything (unless you are doing something which involves modifying the registery) is very, very, simple to do. Don't have to even touch the command prompt.

In any case, when I switched to Linux (because I had to)

all those problems went away immediately, without exception and without "training"

Why do you think those 80 year old's learn how to use Windows and not Linux?
You are very clearly exaggerating your points. You may as well post "windoz sux!" and "linux rulz!"

Everything was easy.

Oh dear, maybe we've forgotten a little something.
Fork bomb in Linux with explanation:

 /- Define the function ':' without any parameters '()' as follows:
 | /- Beginning of function-block.
 | | /- Load a copy of the function ':' into memory ...
 | | |/- ... and pipe its output to ...
 | | ||/- ... another copy of the ':'-function, which has to be loaded into memory.
 | | |||   (In other words, ':|:' loads two more copies of ':', thus causing a chain-reaction)
 | | |||/- Disown the functions (make them a background process), so that the children of a parent
 | | ||||  will not be killed when the parent gets auto-killed.
 | | |||| /- End of function-block.
 | | |||| |/- End of definition. 
/-\| |||| ||/- Execute the function ':'.  The chain-reaction begins.
:(){ :|:& };:

Fork bomb in Windows with explanation:

REM Sets tag "a"
:a
REM Starts new command prompt
start
REM Repeats process
goto a

I can really see how "Everything was easy"

I mostly program robot control / estimation software, multi-body dynamics simulations, and artificial intelligence, and in these fields, Linux is unavoidable, and preferred by most (including me).

No. Linux is not unavoiable. I must say, you can do virtually anything with Windows.
I consider Linux to be limited.

And, also, I have been using Oracle Linux, and if all you think Windows is more vulnerable to viruses, think again - since linux has most programming languages are already installed virus code for any machine could easily work on Linux! When I installed Linux as a virtual machine it had, C, Python 2.4 (security hazard, could not update to most secure 2.7), Perl, and Ruby.

Windows is more convineint, by far.
Windows:
* Windows is my target platform (linux is supported, but it's a minority of users) so I should focus primarily on the target platform during development.
* My personally preferred tools (i.e. Visual Studio) are Windows applications.
* If I want to use leet nix tools like bash/vim/git/etc, there's native Windows versions.

Linux:
* I like cheese more

Votes + Comments
I have used windows and linux. It is much easier to download things on linux than it is on windows. And there are several different things (that are a lot like visual studio) that are out there. Check a little bit more into these things before you say the
2

You are some piece of work my friend, or shall I say "troll".

Actually, that line can refer to a programming language

Right. And then you list 4 scripting languages. Bravo.. If I wanted to look stupid I could not have done better.

What, Shell Scripting? Remember this, Powershell is a form of Shell Scripting, and batch is also a form of shell scripting.

Powershell is fairly new, and is pretty much the same a bash shell. Batch scripting is an extremely limited shell, trying to do anything meaningful with it is a joke.

And for Python too, there is the win32 package, which is not for Linux or Mac

Python on windows is pretty bad, and lags behind. Using python in Linux (or Mac) is extremely easy and much more "native" than on windows. Also, Python is used extensively in Linux coding as the glue between lower-level C/C++ code. Many (if not most) libraries and applications in Linux have a Python layer at the top. I doubt this is the case in Windows due to the poor integration of Python in Windows.

Maybe because I dont know C or C++, but for Python with Windows, all you need to do is move the module to Python32/27/26/25, but for Linux, it is no easier than trying to build a nuclear reactor in a darkened room with watch pieces using only your teeth.

I'm no expert in Python, but I've dabbled with it. In Linux, you can do the same (i.e., add your module to the system folder), or you can do other things that are much more convenient. I was able to pick this up in 5 minutes, it's easy, I suggest you try. If building a nuclear reactor were that easy, we would have 6 year-olds doing it for craft-works in kindergarden.

Why do you think those 80 year old's learn how to use Windows and not Linux?

How many 80 year-olds do you know that are also software developers? My point only pertained to software development. I made that very clear at the beginning of my post (and, it is also the subject of your original question, may I remind you).

I can really see how "Everything was easy"

Ok, well, everything I need to do in my field of work, software development for robotic systems.

No. Linux is not unavoiable.

Linux is unavoidable in my field, did you actually read anything of what I wrote?

I must say, you can do virtually anything with Windows.

Yeah, right. Try making a hard real-time program in Windows, and tell me how it goes (rhetorical). Try compiling a custom micro-kernel version of Windows for an embedded device. Try running a super-computer with Windows. Heck, try running Windows on your mobile phone. Try producing a 6-sigma application for precision manufacturing on Windows (as the saying goes, Windows can do it well, you just need to use a version prior to 1995 and remove the unstable graphical interface from it).

I consider Linux to be limited.

Windows is limited to desktops / laptops, fooled some people into using it for servers, and almost works for game consoles too. Linux is pretty much unlimited, by definition, and empirically, if you look at its very broad application areas today.

Windows is my target platform (linux is supported, but it's a minority of users) so I should focus primarily on the target platform during development.

The world is bigger than your backyard. If Windows is your target platform, then by all means program in (and for) Windows. But you must understand that Windows is not everyone's target platform and with the broad application areas of Linux, there are many people whose line of work has them targetting or working with Linux, and thus, the higher likelihood of meeting more Linux developers on an IT forum like this one than you would in your own line of work (again, I'm reminding you of your original post / question).

My personally preferred tools (i.e. Visual Studio) are Windows applications.

Again, you must understand that your personal opinion is not that of all (which is the point of discussing on a forum). My opinion of Visual Studio is that it is sub-par. I assumed that the purpose of your original post was to learn about why many people prefer the Linux environment for development, or why so many people have Linux environments as their target platform. It seems, now, that you just want repeat your "Windows rules!" opinion time and time again, quelling any dissent or alternate views.

If I want to use leet nix tools like bash/vim/git/etc, there's native Windows versions.

Yeah. Under cygwin! The ones you mentioned, bash, vi and git, all run in cygwin, which is a Unix environment slapped on top of Windows. You call that "native"? By that measure, I could say that Linux is as good as Windows because most Windows apps run natively in Linux, i.e., under Wine! You keep putting your foot in your mouth so much that I'm really starting to think it's deliberate on your part.

-3

or shall I say "troll".

When people say this, I laugh - the word "troll" is what everyone calls me when I try to prove my point, and when they have no more valid arguments.

Right. And then you list 4 scripting languages. Bravo.. If I wanted to look stupid I could not have done better.

Here you go, maybe you've forgotten a little something

Powershell is fairly new, and is pretty much the same a bash shell. Batch scripting is an extremely limited shell, trying to do anything meaningful with it is a joke.

:) You have proved you do not know the slightest thing about Windows, there's alot you can do with Batch. It depends what you actually want to do.

My opinion of Visual Studio is that it is sub-par.

You are funny.

Linux is unavoidable in my field, did you actually read anything of what I wrote?

Let me reply to this with a little quote of mine

I must say, you can do virtually anything with Windows.

So...true.

Linux is pretty much unlimited, by definition, and empirically, if you look at its very broad application areas today.

Sure, all that - try gaming on linux, and even harder, try to get it to go faster than 2 fps.
And of course, what happened to Photoshop?
MS SQL, right? You can do that on Linux, cant you? (sarcasm)
I can see how Linux is so, so... great :P

Windows is limited to desktops / laptops, fooled some people into using it for servers

Windows Server 2008 rocks man, thats all you need to know

My point only pertained to software development. I made that very clear at the beginning of my post

Well, my point is that if an 80 year old finds Windows easy to use, then a software developer finds it very easy to use. Meaning its actually what you call "helpful".

I'm no expert in Python

Then I will not read the rest of that one.

Ok, well, everything I need to do in my field of work, software development for robotic systems.

You had said, "Everything was easy" then limited that point to your field of work.
So your telling me every job associated with computer programming on Linux is easy because your job is easy.

Python on windows is pretty bad

Let me reply with a little quote of yours this time:

I'm no expert in python

Explains a lot.

3

I use both Windows and Linux on a daily basis. Windows is a great GUI and Linux is a great server. Use the right tool for the job. You can drive a screw in with a hammer but it is not going to look pretty and may fail.

A few comments I just have to make.

  1. The simplest reason the Linux/Unix/OSx are so popular is they work constantly for years and years without reboot or issues. I work in a data center where we have a few thousand servers, some on the web and some on private networks not visable to the web. The ratio is about 65% Windows Server to 35% Linux. However in most cases One Linux server does the same job faster that the 2 to 4 Windows servers performing the same task, hence the ratio. Most of our customers using Windows reboot once every week or at least every two weeks to flush the memory and clean up issues. When we do updates to the OS we reboot at the beginning or the process and of course when the updates finish. We constantly monitor all of the servers and most of our support staff spend their time fixing Windows issues.

The Linux servers on the other hand run for years without reboots and rarly have issues requiring attention. We can and regularly do upgrades to the Kernel, upgrade or install software, remove aplications or add drive space all without rebooting the server. We have 4 techs at all times overseeing the Windows Server issues and 1 tech that is assigned to handling Linux be he usually helps with the Windows issues.

  1. Linux is secure. There are now more viruses for Windows than there are people on the planet. The primary reason we run virus scanners on our Linux servers is to catch Windows Viruses passing through the server via email or FTP.

  2. Windows power shell is slowly catching up to where the linux shell was about 20 years ago. In Windows at last you can pipe the output from more than just a few commands to another program. However I can still write a linux script with a few lines of code instead of the massive scripts and command names I have to use in Windows.

I run Linux on my laptop (i7 quad core, 8GB memory, 750GB HD), Windows 7 on my desktop (so I can play games) and Linux for my personal file server and firewall at home (P4 3.0 dual core, 4GB Mem, 1.8TB raid 5 array). My File server has been up and running for 973 days without a reboot, crash, or being hacked (I get about a 1000 attempts a night). Show me one Windows server, anywhere in the world, that can make the same claim.

0

I just read these and Have to add this:

Sure, all that - try gaming on linux, and even harder, try to get it to go faster than 2 fps.
And of course, what happened to Photoshop?
MS SQL, right? You can do that on Linux, cant you? (sarcasm)
I can see how Linux is so, so... great :P

  1. Most of your gaming servers are Linux or Unix boxes hosting the on line game.
  2. Photoshop under Linux has many names but the first one that comes to mind is GIMP which looks runs and works just like photoshop, AND IS FREE!
  3. MySQL is the database of choice for Linux and even microsoft admist that it run circles around MS-SQL Server. Here is technet article which compare the two and says basically "sure mysql is faster but we have features they don't." Click Here And most of those features are to stop windows hacks.

Quit being such a snob about Windows. You remind me of people that said "Stick with your horse those Automobiles are crap."

1

Why people like a particular OS is purely a personal matter - all replies you get will be subjective. That being said, here is my $0.02.

I use both to some extent - which one depends entirely on the task at hand.

For instance, I take classes remotely and the content is developed and distributed using microsoft tools (Silverlight, PowerPoint, Word, ...). While there are Linux variants of these tools they are generally a version or two behind the native implementations and suffer from portability issues. Due to this, I use Microsoft to view and participate in class.

Similarly, for work, all internal infrastructure is Windows based. When corporations (larger ones) began to digitize heavily it was more natural to gravitate to Windows (things like Ubuntu and Gnome didn't exist at the time). Once that infrastructure is in place it is expensive to replace. So if it is a non-development task at work (presentations, email, etc) I use Windows-based tools to play nice with my colleagues.

However, when I develop, I prefer to use the command line (it is what I've become accostomed to). I can move faster without a mouse than I could ever dream to in an IDE (Linux or Windows based). I find that the suite of tools geared to that environment is richer in the Linux world; so I develop on Linux.

Lastly, I'll add that there are some areas that really are just more accessible from a Linux prespective (the converse is just as true). For example, I work with low-level networking code. For the most part I can live at the system call interface to that code but sometimes I need access to the inner workings of the lower layers and that means diving into the kernel. I simply can not do that on Windows. In fact, working with raw sockets on Windows is difficult in it's own right. If I want to build a bridge node in a network to try out a new protocol adaptation Linux is my only option.

Each system has its strengths. Each its weaknesses. The fact that both are still relevant after all this time is a testament to that.

Honestly, I think it really boils down to comfort and need. People try to use what is comfortable to them and adapt that comfort to external needs. You are going to be hard pressed to find an answer to your original question that is not largely anecdotal.

Votes + Comments
a great answer to a subjective question
-1

Use the right tool for the job. You can drive a screw in with a hammer but it is not going to look pretty and may fail.

...

I must say, you can do virtually anything with Windows.

Again, so...true.

Quit being such a snob about Windows. You remind me of people that said "Stick with your horse those Automobiles are crap."

I'm trying to make a damn point.
Can your mac/linux do this?
Or this?
Or this?
Does it take a load of god damn Windows multi-tasking videos for you to understand what power is at your potential when you use Windows?

0

Can your mac/linux do this?

Yes, of course, it can.

It should also be noted, that in that video the user manually resizes the VLC window on which he wants to focus. In the Mac video to which this was a response, the windows was focused and restored to its actual size by clicking on it, not by manually resizing it (also all other windows where restored to their old positions). So usability-wise the Mac version is clearly superior here (and I'm saying that as someone who has no particular love for Mac).

-2

Yes, of course, it can.

No, Linux cannot do that, at all.
I tried running the same amount of videos on Ubuntu Linux (99)
As you would imagine, Ubuntu is not very good at opening mass videos.
I had sufficient RAM (1TB) and was using an SSD card and had intel i5.
after opening 50 in about 3 minutes (unlike the Windows machine in 2 seconds, as demonstrated in the video I had provided) I got a black terminal window. And then, the laptop died.

And for Mac, OK fair point - but how much more are you paying?

Edited by HTMLperson5

0

I tried running the same amount of videos on Ubuntu Linux (99)

Do all those tests run the same software, VLC?

0

Do all those tests run the same software, VLC?

Yes, I installed VLC via commandline.
I used VLC version 1.0.6 for Ubuntu 10.04

1

Did you run Ubuntu Server ? If not, comparing a server against a desktop is a little flawed.

Edited by pritaeas

-1

Did you run Ubuntu Server ?

No. Later I tried OpenSuse, and I could not install VLC on it (See what I mean when I say Linux can hardly do the simplest things?)
I used the default player. But then it crashed.
So I used firefox to play videos (Firefox takes lots of RAM for a more challenging test)
It was sort of like this (Skip to 1:07) but with Linux. It could barely finish buffering ONE VIDEO! ONE! It was pathetic.

0

I want to know how you installed 1TB of RAM. Windows 2008 64bit max ram is 256GB. I can explain to you how Linux in the server roll out runs a Windows server but I can't make you understand it. Quit being such a snob.

By the way still not comment on the uptime question I ask before?

0

I want to know how you installed 1TB of RAM.

Here. It is possible

Quit being such a snob.

I find it hypocritical of you to call me a snob.

0

You said:

No, Linux cannot do that, at all.
I tried running the same amount of videos on Ubuntu Linux (99)
As you would imagine, Ubuntu is not very good at opening mass videos.
I had sufficient RAM (1TB) and was using an SSD card and had intel i5.
after opening 50 in about 3 minutes (unlike the Windows machine in 2 seconds, as demonstrated in the video I had provided) I got a black terminal window. And then, the laptop died.

I want to know how you installed 1TB of RAM.

Here. It is possible

You might try reading the posts that you site. I did and it says that it currently cannot be done. So how did you do it?

Quit being such a snob.

I find it hypocritical of you to call me a snob.

Really! I use both Windows and Linux and know the limits of each. I also only make claims I can back up with facts. Still no answer on the longest uptime for a Windows system with a reboot or crash?

-2

You might try reading the posts that you site. I did and it says that it currently cannot be done. So how did you do it?

http://answers.yahoo.com/question/index?qid=20090326173929AAAHIfN

Stop whining about how good Linux is and that everyone must use Linux, if they don't use Linux then they are snobs, if they have their own points of view they are snobs.

It IS possible to install 1TB of ram. It's because some people have something called money, and a lot of it :)

1

The only one whining in any of the posts is you. And the only one claiming that people must use a specific OS is again you... You are entitled to your opinion like every one else, just don't make things up to make your story sound good.

At least I am not limited to one OS by ignorance and bias.

I still am curious, in your post you said

I tried running the same amount of videos on Ubuntu Linux (99)
As you would imagine, Ubuntu is not very good at opening mass videos.
I had sufficient RAM (1TB) and was using an SSD card and had intel i5.
after opening 50 in about 3 minutes (unlike the Windows machine in 2 seconds, as demonstrated in the video I had provided) I got a black terminal window. And then, the laptop died.

Are you now claiming to own a supercomputer like the one sited in the Yahoo article? And a supercomputer laptop with 1TB of RAM I am impressed. I guess we can just expect this claim is as valid as all your others.

So who makes your laptop carrying case?

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So who makes your laptop carrying case?

Dude, calm down ;) It IS possible to install a few TB of RAM.
How do I attach a picture on Daniweb? I have used Snipping Tool (which Linux does not have) to take a snapshot of my Windows specs, so I have PROOF it is possible to install 2/1 TB of RAM.

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In a distributed system you can do that but not in a single laptop, at least looking at the specs it is hardly possible

K9 Blue Coat Software:

"Blocked
Misleading/Questionable Sources"

You are the fool :D

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